Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trial

Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trialCruz has argued that if witnesses will be allowed in the upcoming Senate impeachment trial, a rule of reciprocity should be implemented.


ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'

ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'Federal authorities are turning to a new tactic in the escalating conflict over New York City's so-called sanctuary policies, issuing four “immigration subpoenas” to the city for information about inmates wanted for deportation. “This is not a request — it's a demand,” Henry Lucero, a senior U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official, told The Associated Press. Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration said Saturday the city would review the subpoenas.


Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt Floor

Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt FloorTwo more bodies have been discovered at a Tijuana, Mexico, property where investigators earlier found the remains of a missing California couple buried under the dirt floor of a house on Friday. Jesús Rubén López Guillén, 70, a U.S. resident, and his wife Maria Teresa Guillén, 65, a naturalized U.S. citizen, were reported missing by their daughter Norma López after they traveled from Garden Grove to Tijuana on Jan. 10 to collect more than $6,400 in overdue rent from their 37-year-old son-in-law. Police in Garden Grove launched a missing persons investigation after López said she could no longer track her parents’ movements through the Find My Phone app. She said the last signal she received before their phone went dead was at the property they owned where her husband was living in southern Tijuana, about 4 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their bodies were found buried under the dirt floor of one of the property’s three homes late Friday.While conducting an investigation into the circumstances of the Guilléns’ murder, Mexican investigators say they discovered the bodies of another couple buried in the property. It is not known if they were found in the same house as the Guilléns’ remains. The new victims have not yet been identified, but police in Mexico say they also may have been involved in a monetary dispute with the son-in-law.The son-in-law, a Mexican national who was deported from the U.S. in 2012 and identified only as “Santiago” in court documents, was first charged with the California couple’s disappearance and taken into custody while the property was searched. Baja California state prosecutor Hirán Sánchez confirmed that when his in-law’s bodies were found, he was charged with their murder.Sanchez told reporters that when the son-in-law was first questioned about what happened to his in-laws, he offered up a “series of contradictions” including a tale that they had walked across the border and that he had picked them up. López says her parents had instead driven their own pickup truck to retrieve the money. The son-in-law also told police that he first took them to their property and then they went together to a bank to exchange currency he paid them, after which he said he drove them back to the border. Instead investigators say that the son-in-law tried to extract money with the couple’s bank cards.“The Guilléns drove themselves to their houses, not Santiago,” Sanchez said at a news conference. “They never left.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ river

Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ riverVanessa Smallwood of Maple Shade, N.J., was 46 at the time of her disappearance. She was identified in a statement from New Jersey State Police.


Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigation

Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigationPresident Trump's latest Russia expert has reportedly been escorted from the White House amid claims of a security-related investigation.


California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over School

California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over SchoolThe teachers felt “sick, dizzy and nauseated” after being covered with the fuel


Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this long

Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this longWomen could've fought for the ERA long before now, but too many chose political ideology over enshrining protections in the U.S. Constitution.


The 25 Best PSP Games

The 25 Best PSP Games


Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shut

Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shutA restive volcano in the Philippines has a high risk of eruption as it is "recharging" with fresh magma and rising emissions of toxic gas, a top scientist said on Monday, while authorities ordered commercial establishments to stay shut. Earthquakes were still happening at the Taal volcano, which shot giant clouds of ash miles into the air on Jan. 12, and levels of the gas were rising, a sign of magma "recharging" and "resupplying" beneath it, a Philippine vulcanologist said. "If it reaches the crater, it could cause a strong explosion," Renato Solidum, director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), told DZMM radio.


Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on board

Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on boardWorkers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.


Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across border

Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across borderAdolfo Cardenas smiles faintly at the memory of traveling with his 14-year-old son from Honduras to the U.S.-Mexico border in only nine days, riding buses and paying a smuggler $6,000 to ensure passage through highway checkpoints. Father and son walked about 10 minutes in Arizona's stifling June heat before surrendering to border agents. Instead of being released with paperwork to appear in immigration court in Dallas, where Cardenas hopes to live with a cousin, they were bused more than an hour to wait in the Mexican border city of Mexicali.


Battle over impeachment witnesses escalates

Battle over impeachment witnesses escalatesKey players in President Donald Trump’s impending trial amplified their arguments on the Sunday news shows.


China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?

China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?World War III is no joke...


Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sources

Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sourcesAt least 70 Yemeni soldiers have been killed in a missile attack launched by Huthi rebels on a mosque in the central province of Marib, medical and military sources said Sunday. The Huthis attacked a mosque in a military camp in Marib -- about 170 kilometres (105 miles) east of Sanaa -- during evening prayers on Saturday, military sources told AFP.


'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-Ed

'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-EdChesley “Sully” Sullenberger opened up about his past struggles with stuttering in defending Biden and his speech.


Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek

Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. received intelligence about a potentially imminent attack being planned against military personnel stationed in Germany, Newsweek reported, citing a memo it saw.The 66th Military Intelligence Brigade received third party information stating that a possible attack could occur against soldiers at either Tower Barracks in Grafenwohr or Tower Barracks, Dulmen; the exact location, date and time of possible attack was unknown Information was marked unclassified and from a senior U.S. intelligence official “The source of information stated the attack would be carried out by an unknown Jordanian extremist currently located in Germany near an unknown military base,” the report saidU.S. Army Europe confirmed to Newsweek that a potential threat was identified and investigated last night “German and US officials were consulted and no imminent threat was found to exit”To view the source of this information click hereTo contact the reporter on this story: Nathan Crooks in Miami at ncrooks@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sebastian Tong at stong41@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireball

SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireballA SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.


Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TV

Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TVIran considers dual nationals aboard a Ukrainian plane that was shot down accidentally this month to be Iranian citizens, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said on Monday. Iran does not recognize dual nationality. Many of the 176 people killed in the disaster were Iranians with dual citizenship.


A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the Midwest

A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the MidwestAuthorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.


2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-in

2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-inGov. Wanda Vázquez fired the heads of Puerto Rico’s housing and family departments Sunday in the latest fallout over the discovery of a warehouse filled with emergency supplies dating from Hurricane Maria. The removal of Housing Secretary Fernando Gil and Department of Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar came a day after the governor fired the director of Puerto Rico’s emergency management agency. Vázquez fired him hours after a Facebook video showed angry people breaking into the warehouse in an area where thousands have been in shelters since a recent earthquake.


Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekend

Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekendThe Senate impeachment trial is set to begin on Tuesday in Washington.


Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class Submarines

Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class SubmarinesThe class seems to have overcome its technical and financial problems, although the lingering impact of those issues could affect not only future classes of SSNs, but also the UK’s commitment to building a new class of SSBNs.


Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expires

Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expiresThousands of Iraqi anti-government protesters grappled with security forces in a bid to shut streets across the country on Monday, a deadline they had given authorities to implement long-awaited reforms. Rallies have rocked Iraq since October but fearing they would lose momentum amid spiralling regional tensions protesters last Monday told the government it had one week to meet their demands or they would escalate. Late Sunday young protesters began sealing off highways and bridges across the capital Baghdad and Iraq's south, torching tyres and setting up makeshift barricades.


China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virus

China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reported 17 new cases of the mysterious SARS-like virus on Sunday, including three people in serious condition, heightening fears ahead of China's Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of people move around the country. The new coronavirus strain has caused alarm because of its connection to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003. Of the 17 new cases in the central city of Wuhan -- believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak -- three were described as "severe", of which two patients were too critical to be moved, authorities said.


TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agent

TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agentTara Houska ‘humiliated’ by TSA agent who ‘snapped my braids like reins’ during screening at Minneapolis-St Paul airportThe federal Transportation Security Administration has apologized to a Native American woman who said an agent at Minneapolis-St Paul international airport “pulled her braids” and said “giddy up!” when she took a flight from there this week.“The agent said she needed to pat down my braids,” tweeted Tara Houska, an indigenous rights advocate and attorney. “She pulled them behind my shoulders, laughed and said ‘giddyup!’ as she snapped my braids like reins. My hair is part of my spirit. I am a Native woman. I am angry, humiliated. Your ‘fun’ hurt.”Houska, who is Ojibwe, added: “When I informed the middle-aged blonde woman who had casually used her authority to dehumanize and disrespect me, she said, ‘Well it was just in fun, I’m sorry. Your hair is lovely.’“That is NOT an apology and it is NOT OK.”According to the Washington Post, women of color have long experienced problems at TSA checkpoints, because natural, braided or twisted hair prompt “flags” on security devices, spurring “more invasive screenings”.Bring Me The News, a Minnesota website, appeared to have been first to report Houska’s experience.In a statement to the Guardian, the TSA said it had been “made aware of allegations made by a traveler about her screening experience at Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport [on] Monday morning.“TSA officials investigated the incident and on Tuesday afternoon, TSA’s federal security director for Minnesota, Cliff Van Leuven, spoke with the traveler. He apologized for actions and a comment that were insensitive and made by a TSA officer to the traveler during the screening experience.”Van Leuven also wrote to airport staff.“In the news last night and today,” he said, “you’ve likely seen – or heard – of a TSA officer at MSP who was insensitive in screening the long braided hair of a Native American passenger Monday morning. Did it actually happen? Yes. Exactly as described? Yes.“This morning, I reached out to the passenger via email. She called me back early this afternoon. I apologized for how she was treated during the screening of her braids – and we had a very pleasant conversation.“She reiterated that she doesn’t want the officer to get in trouble, but she is hoping we’ll take the chance to continue to educate our staff about the many Native American Tribes/Bands in our state and region to better understand their culture.”The airport apologized on Twitter.Houska could not immediately be reached for comment.


El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughter

El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughterThe mug shot of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, imprisoned leader of the ruthless Sinaloa Cartel, is not just for police blotters anymore.


Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'

Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will need to be protected at taxpayers’ expense against the threat of terror attacks and kidnap for years to come, security experts have said. Police and former security chiefs fear the couple will continue to be at risk from organised terror groups, political fanatics and lone obsessives long after they separate from the Royal family. Talks are understood to be taking place at senior levels over the best way of providing protection for Meghan and Prince Harry as they divide their time between Britain and their new life in North America. But there are fears among some experts that palace and government officials may be underestimating both the potential threat and what is required to protect the couple against it. Dai Davies, who was Head of Royal Protection from 1994 to 1998 and former Chief Superintendent (Divisional Commander) Metropolitan Police Service, said: “We have to learn the lessons of history and act on them. Anyone in charge of security has to think the impossible and then think it again and I fear there is not enough of that going on by the experts currently in charge. “One thing you can be sure of is that terrorists and others who pose a threat are thinking about it all the time.” Mr Davies said the three main threats come from jihadist terrorists targeting Prince Harry, who also served in Afghanistan; lone ‘fixateds’ and royal obsessives; and right wing extremists with an hatred of Meghan as a woman of colour marrying into the royal family. Minister and senior police officers are thought to be determined to avoid the mistakes made over Diana, Princess of Wales, who in 1993 turned down publicly funded police protection except when she was with her sons William and Harry or staying at Kensington Palace. That left her relying on private security at other times, leading to her being in the hands of the Ritz Hotel’s head of security Herni Paul on the night she died when their car crashed in the Pont de l'Alma underpass as he tried to evade photographers following Diana. Her bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones was badly injured in the crash, on 31 August 1997. Ken Wharfe, who served as Diana's royal protection officer for six years, resigned from the position in 1993, has since said that if he and his team were working with the Princess in 1997, they may have been able to prevent her death.  Mr Davies, who said there have been far more plots against the Royals than publicly acknowledged, added: “We don't want the situation where Harry and Meghan are being followed, without protection, by paparazzi or people with a fixation and we need to be sure that protection is of the highest level.” But he added that the high cost of providing security may cause resentment among British taxpayers if the Sussexes begin to earn large sums of private income outside of any Royal duties they continue to carry out. “The question is whether the British public will wear the cost of security, even if it is miniscule in real terms, over a long period,” said Mr Davies, who was in charge of protection for the Queen and the Royal family throughout the UK and worldwide. Lord West of Spithead, who was a security minister from 2007 to 2010, said that Harry and Meghan would be expected to make a contribution towards the cost of their security should they start earning a large amount of private income. But he said there was no question that high levels of police protection would have to be provided by the British government into the future. “We have got an obligation to provide security for one of the Queen’s sons and his family and that’s a long term obligation,” he said. “It would be nice to work out an arrangement with the Canadians, but we can’t not provide that protection ourselves, regardless. Mike Penning MP, who was police minister from 2014 to 2016 and went on to serve as justice and Armed Forces minister, said: “It doesn’t matter who they are, if they are at risk we have a duty to protect them, it’s as simple as that. That requirement should be based on any risk assessment made by our intelligence services and by the Canadians.”


The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the world

The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the worldThere's something powerful about finally seeing a famous landmark or natural wonder in person instead of on a postcard (or on Instagram).


Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in Panama

Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in PanamaA religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.


US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwise

US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwiseThe U.S. ambassador to South Korea has some unusual explanations for the harsh criticism he's faced in his host country. Or a Japanese ancestry that raises unpleasant reminders of Japan's former colonial domination of Korea? Many South Koreans, however, have a more straight-forward explanation for Harry Harris' struggle to win hearts and minds in Seoul, and it's got more to do with an outspoken manner that they see as undiplomatic and rude.


Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial

Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial(Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violent

Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violentA prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activist was arrested by police, his organization said on Monday, after a protest he helped organize in the financial district a day earlier turned violent with officers firing tear gas to disperse the crowds. Ventus Lau was arrested on Sunday evening on charges of "obstruction of police administration" and violating terms set when permission was granted for the protest, the Hong Kong Civil Assembly Team said in a statement. "It was primarily rioters' violent acts which led to the suspension of the gathering," Senior Superintendent Ng Lok-chun told reporters.


Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at Sobibor

Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at SobiborNew photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there. Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011. According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give "detailed insight" into the camp in German-occupied Poland.


Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants

Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants“This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”


Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang region

Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang regionA strong earthquake damaged buildings and injured at least one person seriously in China's far west Xinjiang region, the government said Monday. Rescue teams were sent to Peyzawat county, an area east of the city of Kashgar, after the Sunday night quake. State broadcaster CCTV showed a cluster of small collapsed brick buildings and partially fallen walls that fronted properties along the street.


Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assets

Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assetsAfrica’s richest woman has been accused of corruption and exploiting her own country’s natural resources, after thousands of documents detailing her business interests were leaked to the media. Isabel dos Santos, who resides in the UK and whose father was the president of Angola, faces allegations of exploiting family connections to secure deals on land, oil and diamonds. According to the documents, seen by BBC Panorama and the Guardian, she and her husband were allowed to buy up valuable state assets and siphon hundreds of millions of dollars out of Angola. Ms dos Santos, whose fortune is estimated at £2bn, says these claims are entirely false and that she is the victim of a witch-hunt led by the Angolan government. She also wrote on Twitter that the leaked documents were “fake” and based on “false information.”     Ms dos Santos is already under investigation for corruption by the Angolan government, which has frozen her assets in the country. The documents were obtained by the Platform to Protect Whistle-blowers in Africa and then passed to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Anti-corruption campaigners responded by claiming that Ms dos Santos has been exploiting her own country for personal gain, with normal Angolan citizens the victims of her lavish lifestyle. "Every time she appears on the cover of some glossy magazine somewhere in the world, every time that she hosts one of her glamorous parties in the south of France, she is doing so by trampling on the aspirations of the citizens of Angola,” Andrew Feinstein, the head of Corruption Watch, told the BBC. In an interview with the BBC following the leak, Ms dos Santos said: “I regret that Angola has chosen this path, I think that we all stand a lot to lose. “Now, when you look at my track record and you see the work I have done and look at all the companies I have built, most certainly my companies are commercial companies.   “If you tell me, is there anything wrong for an Angolan person to have a business venture with a state company, I think there is nothing wrong.” She added that she was facing “prejudice” due to being the daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, who served as President of Angola from 1979 to 2017. Ms dos Santos was educated in the UK and is married to Sindika Dokolo, a Congolese art collector and businessman.


A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million years

A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million yearsA photo of a piece of petrified wood has been shared across the Internet, but no one knows who took it or why it's such a rock star.


A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto Rico

A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto RicoKaylen Ward says she raised $1 million for Australia, sending nudes to people who donated. Now she is doing the same, raising money for Puerto Rico.


S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from China

S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from ChinaSouth Korea on Monday confirmed its first case of the SARS-like virus that is spreading in China, as concerns mount about a wider outbreak. A 35-year-old Chinese woman who flew in from Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was confirmed to have the new coronavirus strain, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said. "She was visiting Seoul on a tour for the Lunar New Year holidays," said KCDC director Jung Eun-kyeong, adding Korean authorities were investigating her movement on the plane and those who might have come in contact with her, including flight attendants.


Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian Americans

Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian AmericansAs penalties create hardship for Iran’s residents, Iranians in US also suffer consequences: ‘The sanctions are still chasing me’Following the US assassination of a top Iranian general earlier this month and Iranian airstrikes against US military bases in Iraq, Donald Trump once again imposed biting sanctions against the regime in Tehran. To Iranian Americans, many of whom have lived under sanctions in Iran or have family members there suffering through economic hardship, the fresh round of penalties is a painful reminder of the collateral consequences of escalating conflict.Iranian Americans across the United States told the Guardian about their worries for their family members and friends affected by US sanctions. And they spoke of the ways the policies affect their own lives, work and communities in the US. “I was raised under sanctions my entire life,” said Nazanin Asadi, 34, who left Iran for California in 2014 and now works as a law clerk in Orange county. “After moving to the US permanently, I can’t believe the sanctions and these laws are still chasing me … I don’t want my community to suffer.”The threats of a full-blown war following Trump’s 3 January order to kill Gen Qassem Suleimani caused anxiety among some Persian communities in the US, especially for Iranian families who have been torn apart by Trump’s travel ban. Trump backed away from additional strikes, but his administration implemented a fresh wave of sanctions, targeting senior Iranian officials and the country’s textile, construction, manufacturing and other sectors.The US has imposed sanctions for decades, targeting Iran’s energy sector and a range of exports of goods and services. Trump had already expanded sanctions against Iran in 2018 with his withdrawal from the nuclear deal signed under Barack Obama.Under sanctions law, people are forced to apply for specific licenses when they seek to be exempted from prohibited transactions, and even for allowed activities, there are complicated reporting requirements. In practice that means hundreds of thousands of Iranian Americans with family and financial ties to Iran can face a complex set of burdens and hurdles in their lives, jobs and education.“These sanctions are supposed to be targeting the government of Iran and certain individuals, but end up targeting the average person and your own citizens,” said Mehrnoush Yazdanyar, a California attorney who helps Iranian Americans navigate sanctions. “You’re sanctioning your own legal permanent residents, and in doing so, you’re alienating them.” ‘It is a daily stress’Yazdanyar’s law offices in southern California, a region home to the largest Iranian population outside of Iran, have assisted thousands of clients in sanctions-related matters over the years. Families often can’t send money back and forth, creating significant hurdles for Iranian Americans who want to support their parents or families in Iran who want to help their loved ones pursue their education or other dreams in America.While the regulations are supposed to allow some financial transactions through third parties, many attempting to navigate the process can end up in legal trouble or with closed or frozen bank accounts, she said.Asadi, who grew up in Iran, was accepted to the University of Southern California law school and moved here with dreams of becoming a judge. But with the sanctions blocking her parents from offering her financial support, she had to pay her own way through her education, working multiple jobs while studying.“I couldn’t afford my life, I couldn’t pay my expenses,” she said. “It was too much pressure emotionally and financially.”She scraped by and managed to graduate, and she now works with Yazdanyar helping people dealing with sanctions. But when Asadi wants to help her own parents in Iran, who are disabled, she has no way to offer them funds, pay for their medications or even buy them gifts: “We cannot support each other.”That feeling of guilt is even worse when there’s a threat of war, Asadi added: “I’m paying taxes to the government who purchases military equipment to bomb my parents in Iran … If war happens, what should I do?”Pirouz Kavehpour, a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), engineering professor, who is also Iranian American, said he had repeatedly seen his Iranian students lose access to their bank accounts due to sanctions, derailing their research and education.“It’s a daily stress … We’re international. We’re already on thin ice. If you don’t perform well, you will be sent back,” he said. “You’re a kid here and you need to live off fast food … and then you’re told by a random guy in a bank field office: ‘Don’t even think about getting the money.’”With a large wave of Iranian Americans arriving in the US after the 1979 revolution, some are also now inheriting family businesses or properties back in Iran from relatives who have died, but it is often a nightmare process to attempt and recoup the assets, said Erich Ferrari, a Washington DC-based attorney who handles sanctions cases.Even those who try to do everything right, reporting the transactions and getting proper licenses, can end up facing investigations by the US government, he said. Law enforcement monitors money transfers, and in some cases Iranian Americans have found the FBI at their doors asking questions: “There’s always a threat looming.”Ferrari said he had seen family relationships fall apart in the process, adding: “They are trying to do something that is beneficial to the US, and divest themselves from Iran and bring their money here.” Research and charity work thwarted: ‘How does the US benefit?’In addition to the recent wave of Iranian students who have been denied visas at the last minute, under sanctions law, faculty members are also barred from traveling to Iran for research or other work without approval from the US treasury department.“I’ve been invited many times to give a talk in Iran … but we are not allowed,” said Kavehpour, the UCLA professor. He noted that Iran could benefit from working with UCLA experts on autism research, but that it would be impossible to set up any collaboration.Aysan Rangchian, a 28-year-old Iranian PhD student at UCLA, said Iranian students often don’t even apply for conferences anywhere outside of the US for fear of consequences. Iranian students can also struggle to get grants and funding: “This is making the US less appealing for international students.”Last year, Iranian researchers faced criminal prosecution when they attempted to do stem-cell research in the US. As a result of that process, potentially groundbreaking science will not go forward here, said Yazdanyar: “How did the United States benefit from this?”Yazdanyar has also represented a not-for-profit organization that helps orphaned children across the world, including in Iran. Even when the group received a specific license to send aid to Iran, financial institutions in third countries have declined to assist with the transfer due to concerns about sanctions. That means humanitarian aid has been delayed and blocked, she said.During floods in Iran last year, it was painful that the sanctions blocked Iranian Americans from being able to offer basic donations, said Assal Rad, a research fellow with the National Iranian American Council, who lives in Orange county. She said that while the impact of sanctions on Iranian Americans paled in comparison with what Iranian citizens suffer, the rules added to this “constant feeling that your identity is under attack”.“Whether sanctions, the travel ban, or your loyalty being questioned … it’s really isolating,” she said, adding of sanctions: “It’s an ineffective policy that is also harming Americans themselves.”


Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycott

Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycottMalaysia will not take retaliatory trade action against India over its boycott of palm oil purchases amid a political row between the two countries, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said on Monday. "We are too small to take retaliatory action," Mahathir told reporters in Langkawi, a resort island off the western coast of Malaysia.


Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'

Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'President Trump has given a new justification for killing Qassem Soleimani, telling a gathering of Republican donors that the Iranian general was “saying bad things about our country.”


Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be Different

Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be DifferentThis second cold war, conducted on a teeming planet whose anxiety is intensified by the passions and rages of social media, is only in its beginning stages. The aim, like in the first Cold War, is negative victory: not defeating the Chinese, but waiting them out, just as we waited the Soviets out.


Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort Bragg

Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort BraggThe remains of a paratrooper who was killed a week ago in Afghanistan have been returned to his family in the U.S. The family of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin greeted his flag-draped casket at Pope Army Airfield at Fort Bragg on Saturday, The Fayetteville Observer reported. The 29-year-old from Newport News, Virginia, was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.


Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bid

Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bidStriving to extend its influence in the eastern Mediterranean where tensions revolve around energy resources, Turkey sees Cyprus as the weakest link in a regional alliance buffering Ankara's ambitions, analysts told AFP. The bid comes as Turkey flexes its muscle across the Mediterranean from Libya to Syria, where Ankara has taken on diplomatic and military roles. Although Turkish military action is not expected against Cyprus, analysts warn Ankara will increase pressure on Nicosia to deter it from completing its energy exploration plans.


Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the week

Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the weekAn area of high pressure building into the Northwest through Monday will briefly offer tranquil conditions before a storm system descends on the region by midweek.Quiet conditions over the Northwest have directed the storm track farther north into Pacific Canada, resulting in heavy rain and mountain snow in western British Columbia since last week.However, the next Pacific storm will take aim farther south, bringing wet weather back to the Northwest Monday night through Tuesday."Snow levels will be higher than with previous storms, so precipitation along the I-5 corridor from Seattle to Northern California will fall in the form of rain," AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Elliott said.Even though precipitation will fall as a plain rain, motorists may experience a slower Tuesday morning commute along the I-5 corridor. Along the coast, a building westerly swell will create the threat for sneaker waves along area beaches.Beachgoers are advised to stay away from the shoreline to avoid falling victim to these large waves.The threat for wet weather will extend eastward beyond the coastal lowlands and Cascades from the storm.Kennewick and Spokane, Washington, and even Boise, Idaho, can expect wet weather to develop during the day on Tuesday.This storm system is not expected to have snow levels as low as some of the recent systems. However, with levels initially around 3,000 feet, area passes such as Snoqualmie and Stevens could still face some travel issues from Tuesday into Wednesday.The persistent pattern of unsettled weather across the Cascades and northern Sierras will continue to keep an elevated avalanche threat in place this week.As the storm system tracks into the Intermountain West by Wednesday, dry and settled conditions will come to an end.Wintry weather is likely for places like Salt Lake City, Utah, and Yellowstone National Park. While major accumulations are not expected, it will prove beneficial for area ski resorts.AccuWeather meteorologists predict the unsettled pattern will likely continue into late week across the Northwest.A lack of Arctic intrusions will also continue to keep snow levels higher than average for this time of year.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair loss

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair lossPressley, who's been famous for her Senegalese twists, said she first started noticing patches of her hair falling out last fall. She's now bald.


Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a memento

Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a mementoA Montana man told authorities that he cut off a grizzly bear's claws as a memento after shooting it in self-defense because he was mad that the bear was going to eat him, according to court records. Bryan Berg, 35, appeared in court on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Missoula after pleading guilty to illegal transport of grizzly bear claws, a misdemeanor, according to the Flathead Beacon. Grizzly bears in northwestern Montana are classified as a threatened species.


‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidate

‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidateWe don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil Democrats are trying to choose a candidate to beat Donald Trump, the most corrupt president in history. Some think nominating Joe Biden, a moderate white man who calls himself “Middle Class” Joe, makes sense.But Biden has a big corruption problem and it makes him a weak candidate. I know it seems crazy, but a lot of the voters we need – independents and people who might stay home – will look at Biden and Trump and say: “They’re all dirty.”It looks like “Middle Class” Joe has perfected the art of taking big contributions, then representing his corporate donors at the cost of middle- and working-class Americans. Converting campaign contributions into legislative favors and policy positions isn’t being “moderate”. It is the kind of transactional politics Americans have come to loathe.There are three clear examples.First, Biden’s support for finance over working-class Americans. His career was bankrolled by the credit card industry. He delivered for it by spearheading a bankruptcy bill that made it harder for Americans to reduce their debts and helped cause the financial crisis. He not only authored and voted for that bill, he split with Barack Obama and led the battle to vote down Democratic amendments.His explanations for carrying water for the credit card industry have changed over time. They have never rung true.> Nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat TrumpThe simplest explanation is the most likely: he did it for his donors. At a fundraiser last year, Biden promised his Wall Street donors that “nothing would fundamentally change” for them if he became president. Now the financial world is raising huge money for his campaign. It clearly thinks he’s going to be its friend if elected. Most Americans, who get ripped off by the financial sector on a daily basis, aren’t looking for a candidate who has made their life harder.Second, healthcare. On 25 April, the day he announced his campaign, Biden went straight to a fundraiser co-hosted by the chief executive of a major health insurance corporation. He refuses to sign a pledge to reject money from insurance and pharma execs and continues to raise money from healthcare industry donors. His campaign is being bankrolled by a super Pac run by healthcare lobbyists.What did all these donors get? A healthcare proposal that preserves the power of the insurance industry and leaves 10 million Americans uninsured.Third, climate change. Biden signed a pledge not to take money from the fossil fuel industry, then broke his promise. Right after a CNN town hall on climate change, he held a fundraiser hosted by the founder of a fossil fuel conglomerate. He is pushing climate policy that has gotten dismal reviews from several leading environmental groups.There are plenty of other examples that raise questions, like housing and social security. Big real estate moguls are playing a major role in Biden’s campaign. Unlike his rivals, he has no comprehensive housing plan. When he pushed for cuts to Social Security, was he serving donors or his constituents?I can already hear the howls: But look at Trump! Trump is 1,000 times worse!You don’t need to convince me. I have spent my life writing about and fighting against corruption, and in America I have never seen anything like the current administration. In the last three years, I have made combatting Trump’s corruption the heart of my work.I was on the first lawsuit against him for corrupt constitutional violations and I ran for attorney general in New York on a platform of pointing out just how dangerous he is, and how important unused state laws are to stopping him. My work on corruption was cited in the House judiciary committee’s report on impeachment.> 2020 should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and crueltyBut here’s the thing: nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat Trump. It will allow Trump to muddy the water, to once again pretend he is the one “draining the swamp”, running against Washington culture. Trump and the Cambridge Analytica of 2020 will campaign, as they did in 2016, on a message of radical nihilism: everybody lies, everybody is corrupt, nothing matters, there is no truth.Corrupt politicians always use whataboutism. With Biden, we are basically handing Trump a whataboutism playbook. The comparison won’t be fair, but if you think he won’t use Biden’s closeness to donors as a cudgel to try to keep people home, you haven’t been paying attention. Unlike Democrats, who must give voters a reason to come out, Trump doesn’t need voters to love him. He just needs to convince people the whole game is ugly.Whether or not Biden is making choices to please donors, there is no doubt his record represents the transactional, grossly corrupt culture in Washington that long precedes Trump. We cannot allow Trump to so lower our standards that we aren’t even allowed to call out that culture, which has not only stymied progress but also harmed the Democratic party.The good news is that we still have time to break with this culture of corruption. We don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil. The 2020 election should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and cruelty.We have a rare opportunity to end a larger culture of corruption and we should take it – we will regret it if we don’t. * Zephyr Teachout, an associate professor at Fordham Law School, is the author of Corruption in America: From Ben Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United. Her next book is Break ’Em Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money. She has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president.


Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte dies

Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte diesLotte Group founder Shin Kyuk-ho, who started manufacturing chewing gum in 1948 in Japan and built the business into South Korea's No.5 conglomerate with interests ranging from retail to chemicals, died on Sunday, the company said. Lotte was founded in 1948 as a chewing gum maker in Japan by Shin, who moved to the neighbouring country when the Korean peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule.


Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trial

Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trialCruz has argued that if witnesses will be allowed in the upcoming Senate impeachment trial, a rule of reciprocity should be implemented.


ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'

ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'Federal authorities are turning to a new tactic in the escalating conflict over New York City's so-called sanctuary policies, issuing four “immigration subpoenas” to the city for information about inmates wanted for deportation. “This is not a request — it's a demand,” Henry Lucero, a senior U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official, told The Associated Press. Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration said Saturday the city would review the subpoenas.


Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt Floor

Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt FloorTwo more bodies have been discovered at a Tijuana, Mexico, property where investigators earlier found the remains of a missing California couple buried under the dirt floor of a house on Friday. Jesús Rubén López Guillén, 70, a U.S. resident, and his wife Maria Teresa Guillén, 65, a naturalized U.S. citizen, were reported missing by their daughter Norma López after they traveled from Garden Grove to Tijuana on Jan. 10 to collect more than $6,400 in overdue rent from their 37-year-old son-in-law. Police in Garden Grove launched a missing persons investigation after López said she could no longer track her parents’ movements through the Find My Phone app. She said the last signal she received before their phone went dead was at the property they owned where her husband was living in southern Tijuana, about 4 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their bodies were found buried under the dirt floor of one of the property’s three homes late Friday.While conducting an investigation into the circumstances of the Guilléns’ murder, Mexican investigators say they discovered the bodies of another couple buried in the property. It is not known if they were found in the same house as the Guilléns’ remains. The new victims have not yet been identified, but police in Mexico say they also may have been involved in a monetary dispute with the son-in-law.The son-in-law, a Mexican national who was deported from the U.S. in 2012 and identified only as “Santiago” in court documents, was first charged with the California couple’s disappearance and taken into custody while the property was searched. Baja California state prosecutor Hirán Sánchez confirmed that when his in-law’s bodies were found, he was charged with their murder.Sanchez told reporters that when the son-in-law was first questioned about what happened to his in-laws, he offered up a “series of contradictions” including a tale that they had walked across the border and that he had picked them up. López says her parents had instead driven their own pickup truck to retrieve the money. The son-in-law also told police that he first took them to their property and then they went together to a bank to exchange currency he paid them, after which he said he drove them back to the border. Instead investigators say that the son-in-law tried to extract money with the couple’s bank cards.“The Guilléns drove themselves to their houses, not Santiago,” Sanchez said at a news conference. “They never left.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ river

Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ riverVanessa Smallwood of Maple Shade, N.J., was 46 at the time of her disappearance. She was identified in a statement from New Jersey State Police.


Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigation

Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigationPresident Trump's latest Russia expert has reportedly been escorted from the White House amid claims of a security-related investigation.


California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over School

California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over SchoolThe teachers felt “sick, dizzy and nauseated” after being covered with the fuel


Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this long

Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this longWomen could've fought for the ERA long before now, but too many chose political ideology over enshrining protections in the U.S. Constitution.


The 25 Best PSP Games

The 25 Best PSP Games


Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shut

Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shutA restive volcano in the Philippines has a high risk of eruption as it is "recharging" with fresh magma and rising emissions of toxic gas, a top scientist said on Monday, while authorities ordered commercial establishments to stay shut. Earthquakes were still happening at the Taal volcano, which shot giant clouds of ash miles into the air on Jan. 12, and levels of the gas were rising, a sign of magma "recharging" and "resupplying" beneath it, a Philippine vulcanologist said. "If it reaches the crater, it could cause a strong explosion," Renato Solidum, director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), told DZMM radio.


Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on board

Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on boardWorkers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.


Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across border

Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across borderAdolfo Cardenas smiles faintly at the memory of traveling with his 14-year-old son from Honduras to the U.S.-Mexico border in only nine days, riding buses and paying a smuggler $6,000 to ensure passage through highway checkpoints. Father and son walked about 10 minutes in Arizona's stifling June heat before surrendering to border agents. Instead of being released with paperwork to appear in immigration court in Dallas, where Cardenas hopes to live with a cousin, they were bused more than an hour to wait in the Mexican border city of Mexicali.


Battle over impeachment witnesses escalates

Battle over impeachment witnesses escalatesKey players in President Donald Trump’s impending trial amplified their arguments on the Sunday news shows.


China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?

China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?World War III is no joke...


Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sources

Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sourcesAt least 70 Yemeni soldiers have been killed in a missile attack launched by Huthi rebels on a mosque in the central province of Marib, medical and military sources said Sunday. The Huthis attacked a mosque in a military camp in Marib -- about 170 kilometres (105 miles) east of Sanaa -- during evening prayers on Saturday, military sources told AFP.


'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-Ed

'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-EdChesley “Sully” Sullenberger opened up about his past struggles with stuttering in defending Biden and his speech.


Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek

Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. received intelligence about a potentially imminent attack being planned against military personnel stationed in Germany, Newsweek reported, citing a memo it saw.The 66th Military Intelligence Brigade received third party information stating that a possible attack could occur against soldiers at either Tower Barracks in Grafenwohr or Tower Barracks, Dulmen; the exact location, date and time of possible attack was unknown Information was marked unclassified and from a senior U.S. intelligence official “The source of information stated the attack would be carried out by an unknown Jordanian extremist currently located in Germany near an unknown military base,” the report saidU.S. Army Europe confirmed to Newsweek that a potential threat was identified and investigated last night “German and US officials were consulted and no imminent threat was found to exit”To view the source of this information click hereTo contact the reporter on this story: Nathan Crooks in Miami at ncrooks@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sebastian Tong at stong41@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireball

SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireballA SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.


Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TV

Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TVIran considers dual nationals aboard a Ukrainian plane that was shot down accidentally this month to be Iranian citizens, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said on Monday. Iran does not recognize dual nationality. Many of the 176 people killed in the disaster were Iranians with dual citizenship.


A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the Midwest

A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the MidwestAuthorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.


2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-in

2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-inGov. Wanda Vázquez fired the heads of Puerto Rico’s housing and family departments Sunday in the latest fallout over the discovery of a warehouse filled with emergency supplies dating from Hurricane Maria. The removal of Housing Secretary Fernando Gil and Department of Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar came a day after the governor fired the director of Puerto Rico’s emergency management agency. Vázquez fired him hours after a Facebook video showed angry people breaking into the warehouse in an area where thousands have been in shelters since a recent earthquake.


Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekend

Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekendThe Senate impeachment trial is set to begin on Tuesday in Washington.


Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class Submarines

Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class SubmarinesThe class seems to have overcome its technical and financial problems, although the lingering impact of those issues could affect not only future classes of SSNs, but also the UK’s commitment to building a new class of SSBNs.


Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expires

Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expiresThousands of Iraqi anti-government protesters grappled with security forces in a bid to shut streets across the country on Monday, a deadline they had given authorities to implement long-awaited reforms. Rallies have rocked Iraq since October but fearing they would lose momentum amid spiralling regional tensions protesters last Monday told the government it had one week to meet their demands or they would escalate. Late Sunday young protesters began sealing off highways and bridges across the capital Baghdad and Iraq's south, torching tyres and setting up makeshift barricades.


China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virus

China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reported 17 new cases of the mysterious SARS-like virus on Sunday, including three people in serious condition, heightening fears ahead of China's Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of people move around the country. The new coronavirus strain has caused alarm because of its connection to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003. Of the 17 new cases in the central city of Wuhan -- believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak -- three were described as "severe", of which two patients were too critical to be moved, authorities said.


TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agent

TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agentTara Houska ‘humiliated’ by TSA agent who ‘snapped my braids like reins’ during screening at Minneapolis-St Paul airportThe federal Transportation Security Administration has apologized to a Native American woman who said an agent at Minneapolis-St Paul international airport “pulled her braids” and said “giddy up!” when she took a flight from there this week.“The agent said she needed to pat down my braids,” tweeted Tara Houska, an indigenous rights advocate and attorney. “She pulled them behind my shoulders, laughed and said ‘giddyup!’ as she snapped my braids like reins. My hair is part of my spirit. I am a Native woman. I am angry, humiliated. Your ‘fun’ hurt.”Houska, who is Ojibwe, added: “When I informed the middle-aged blonde woman who had casually used her authority to dehumanize and disrespect me, she said, ‘Well it was just in fun, I’m sorry. Your hair is lovely.’“That is NOT an apology and it is NOT OK.”According to the Washington Post, women of color have long experienced problems at TSA checkpoints, because natural, braided or twisted hair prompt “flags” on security devices, spurring “more invasive screenings”.Bring Me The News, a Minnesota website, appeared to have been first to report Houska’s experience.In a statement to the Guardian, the TSA said it had been “made aware of allegations made by a traveler about her screening experience at Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport [on] Monday morning.“TSA officials investigated the incident and on Tuesday afternoon, TSA’s federal security director for Minnesota, Cliff Van Leuven, spoke with the traveler. He apologized for actions and a comment that were insensitive and made by a TSA officer to the traveler during the screening experience.”Van Leuven also wrote to airport staff.“In the news last night and today,” he said, “you’ve likely seen – or heard – of a TSA officer at MSP who was insensitive in screening the long braided hair of a Native American passenger Monday morning. Did it actually happen? Yes. Exactly as described? Yes.“This morning, I reached out to the passenger via email. She called me back early this afternoon. I apologized for how she was treated during the screening of her braids – and we had a very pleasant conversation.“She reiterated that she doesn’t want the officer to get in trouble, but she is hoping we’ll take the chance to continue to educate our staff about the many Native American Tribes/Bands in our state and region to better understand their culture.”The airport apologized on Twitter.Houska could not immediately be reached for comment.


El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughter

El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughterThe mug shot of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, imprisoned leader of the ruthless Sinaloa Cartel, is not just for police blotters anymore.


Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'

Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will need to be protected at taxpayers’ expense against the threat of terror attacks and kidnap for years to come, security experts have said. Police and former security chiefs fear the couple will continue to be at risk from organised terror groups, political fanatics and lone obsessives long after they separate from the Royal family. Talks are understood to be taking place at senior levels over the best way of providing protection for Meghan and Prince Harry as they divide their time between Britain and their new life in North America. But there are fears among some experts that palace and government officials may be underestimating both the potential threat and what is required to protect the couple against it. Dai Davies, who was Head of Royal Protection from 1994 to 1998 and former Chief Superintendent (Divisional Commander) Metropolitan Police Service, said: “We have to learn the lessons of history and act on them. Anyone in charge of security has to think the impossible and then think it again and I fear there is not enough of that going on by the experts currently in charge. “One thing you can be sure of is that terrorists and others who pose a threat are thinking about it all the time.” Mr Davies said the three main threats come from jihadist terrorists targeting Prince Harry, who also served in Afghanistan; lone ‘fixateds’ and royal obsessives; and right wing extremists with an hatred of Meghan as a woman of colour marrying into the royal family. Minister and senior police officers are thought to be determined to avoid the mistakes made over Diana, Princess of Wales, who in 1993 turned down publicly funded police protection except when she was with her sons William and Harry or staying at Kensington Palace. That left her relying on private security at other times, leading to her being in the hands of the Ritz Hotel’s head of security Herni Paul on the night she died when their car crashed in the Pont de l'Alma underpass as he tried to evade photographers following Diana. Her bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones was badly injured in the crash, on 31 August 1997. Ken Wharfe, who served as Diana's royal protection officer for six years, resigned from the position in 1993, has since said that if he and his team were working with the Princess in 1997, they may have been able to prevent her death.  Mr Davies, who said there have been far more plots against the Royals than publicly acknowledged, added: “We don't want the situation where Harry and Meghan are being followed, without protection, by paparazzi or people with a fixation and we need to be sure that protection is of the highest level.” But he added that the high cost of providing security may cause resentment among British taxpayers if the Sussexes begin to earn large sums of private income outside of any Royal duties they continue to carry out. “The question is whether the British public will wear the cost of security, even if it is miniscule in real terms, over a long period,” said Mr Davies, who was in charge of protection for the Queen and the Royal family throughout the UK and worldwide. Lord West of Spithead, who was a security minister from 2007 to 2010, said that Harry and Meghan would be expected to make a contribution towards the cost of their security should they start earning a large amount of private income. But he said there was no question that high levels of police protection would have to be provided by the British government into the future. “We have got an obligation to provide security for one of the Queen’s sons and his family and that’s a long term obligation,” he said. “It would be nice to work out an arrangement with the Canadians, but we can’t not provide that protection ourselves, regardless. Mike Penning MP, who was police minister from 2014 to 2016 and went on to serve as justice and Armed Forces minister, said: “It doesn’t matter who they are, if they are at risk we have a duty to protect them, it’s as simple as that. That requirement should be based on any risk assessment made by our intelligence services and by the Canadians.”


The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the world

The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the worldThere's something powerful about finally seeing a famous landmark or natural wonder in person instead of on a postcard (or on Instagram).


Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in Panama

Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in PanamaA religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.


US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwise

US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwiseThe U.S. ambassador to South Korea has some unusual explanations for the harsh criticism he's faced in his host country. Or a Japanese ancestry that raises unpleasant reminders of Japan's former colonial domination of Korea? Many South Koreans, however, have a more straight-forward explanation for Harry Harris' struggle to win hearts and minds in Seoul, and it's got more to do with an outspoken manner that they see as undiplomatic and rude.


Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial

Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial(Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violent

Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violentA prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activist was arrested by police, his organization said on Monday, after a protest he helped organize in the financial district a day earlier turned violent with officers firing tear gas to disperse the crowds. Ventus Lau was arrested on Sunday evening on charges of "obstruction of police administration" and violating terms set when permission was granted for the protest, the Hong Kong Civil Assembly Team said in a statement. "It was primarily rioters' violent acts which led to the suspension of the gathering," Senior Superintendent Ng Lok-chun told reporters.


Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at Sobibor

Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at SobiborNew photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there. Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011. According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give "detailed insight" into the camp in German-occupied Poland.


Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants

Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants“This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”


Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang region

Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang regionA strong earthquake damaged buildings and injured at least one person seriously in China's far west Xinjiang region, the government said Monday. Rescue teams were sent to Peyzawat county, an area east of the city of Kashgar, after the Sunday night quake. State broadcaster CCTV showed a cluster of small collapsed brick buildings and partially fallen walls that fronted properties along the street.


Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assets

Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assetsAfrica’s richest woman has been accused of corruption and exploiting her own country’s natural resources, after thousands of documents detailing her business interests were leaked to the media. Isabel dos Santos, who resides in the UK and whose father was the president of Angola, faces allegations of exploiting family connections to secure deals on land, oil and diamonds. According to the documents, seen by BBC Panorama and the Guardian, she and her husband were allowed to buy up valuable state assets and siphon hundreds of millions of dollars out of Angola. Ms dos Santos, whose fortune is estimated at £2bn, says these claims are entirely false and that she is the victim of a witch-hunt led by the Angolan government. She also wrote on Twitter that the leaked documents were “fake” and based on “false information.”     Ms dos Santos is already under investigation for corruption by the Angolan government, which has frozen her assets in the country. The documents were obtained by the Platform to Protect Whistle-blowers in Africa and then passed to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Anti-corruption campaigners responded by claiming that Ms dos Santos has been exploiting her own country for personal gain, with normal Angolan citizens the victims of her lavish lifestyle. "Every time she appears on the cover of some glossy magazine somewhere in the world, every time that she hosts one of her glamorous parties in the south of France, she is doing so by trampling on the aspirations of the citizens of Angola,” Andrew Feinstein, the head of Corruption Watch, told the BBC. In an interview with the BBC following the leak, Ms dos Santos said: “I regret that Angola has chosen this path, I think that we all stand a lot to lose. “Now, when you look at my track record and you see the work I have done and look at all the companies I have built, most certainly my companies are commercial companies.   “If you tell me, is there anything wrong for an Angolan person to have a business venture with a state company, I think there is nothing wrong.” She added that she was facing “prejudice” due to being the daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, who served as President of Angola from 1979 to 2017. Ms dos Santos was educated in the UK and is married to Sindika Dokolo, a Congolese art collector and businessman.


A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million years

A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million yearsA photo of a piece of petrified wood has been shared across the Internet, but no one knows who took it or why it's such a rock star.


A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto Rico

A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto RicoKaylen Ward says she raised $1 million for Australia, sending nudes to people who donated. Now she is doing the same, raising money for Puerto Rico.


S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from China

S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from ChinaSouth Korea on Monday confirmed its first case of the SARS-like virus that is spreading in China, as concerns mount about a wider outbreak. A 35-year-old Chinese woman who flew in from Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was confirmed to have the new coronavirus strain, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said. "She was visiting Seoul on a tour for the Lunar New Year holidays," said KCDC director Jung Eun-kyeong, adding Korean authorities were investigating her movement on the plane and those who might have come in contact with her, including flight attendants.


Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian Americans

Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian AmericansAs penalties create hardship for Iran’s residents, Iranians in US also suffer consequences: ‘The sanctions are still chasing me’Following the US assassination of a top Iranian general earlier this month and Iranian airstrikes against US military bases in Iraq, Donald Trump once again imposed biting sanctions against the regime in Tehran. To Iranian Americans, many of whom have lived under sanctions in Iran or have family members there suffering through economic hardship, the fresh round of penalties is a painful reminder of the collateral consequences of escalating conflict.Iranian Americans across the United States told the Guardian about their worries for their family members and friends affected by US sanctions. And they spoke of the ways the policies affect their own lives, work and communities in the US. “I was raised under sanctions my entire life,” said Nazanin Asadi, 34, who left Iran for California in 2014 and now works as a law clerk in Orange county. “After moving to the US permanently, I can’t believe the sanctions and these laws are still chasing me … I don’t want my community to suffer.”The threats of a full-blown war following Trump’s 3 January order to kill Gen Qassem Suleimani caused anxiety among some Persian communities in the US, especially for Iranian families who have been torn apart by Trump’s travel ban. Trump backed away from additional strikes, but his administration implemented a fresh wave of sanctions, targeting senior Iranian officials and the country’s textile, construction, manufacturing and other sectors.The US has imposed sanctions for decades, targeting Iran’s energy sector and a range of exports of goods and services. Trump had already expanded sanctions against Iran in 2018 with his withdrawal from the nuclear deal signed under Barack Obama.Under sanctions law, people are forced to apply for specific licenses when they seek to be exempted from prohibited transactions, and even for allowed activities, there are complicated reporting requirements. In practice that means hundreds of thousands of Iranian Americans with family and financial ties to Iran can face a complex set of burdens and hurdles in their lives, jobs and education.“These sanctions are supposed to be targeting the government of Iran and certain individuals, but end up targeting the average person and your own citizens,” said Mehrnoush Yazdanyar, a California attorney who helps Iranian Americans navigate sanctions. “You’re sanctioning your own legal permanent residents, and in doing so, you’re alienating them.” ‘It is a daily stress’Yazdanyar’s law offices in southern California, a region home to the largest Iranian population outside of Iran, have assisted thousands of clients in sanctions-related matters over the years. Families often can’t send money back and forth, creating significant hurdles for Iranian Americans who want to support their parents or families in Iran who want to help their loved ones pursue their education or other dreams in America.While the regulations are supposed to allow some financial transactions through third parties, many attempting to navigate the process can end up in legal trouble or with closed or frozen bank accounts, she said.Asadi, who grew up in Iran, was accepted to the University of Southern California law school and moved here with dreams of becoming a judge. But with the sanctions blocking her parents from offering her financial support, she had to pay her own way through her education, working multiple jobs while studying.“I couldn’t afford my life, I couldn’t pay my expenses,” she said. “It was too much pressure emotionally and financially.”She scraped by and managed to graduate, and she now works with Yazdanyar helping people dealing with sanctions. But when Asadi wants to help her own parents in Iran, who are disabled, she has no way to offer them funds, pay for their medications or even buy them gifts: “We cannot support each other.”That feeling of guilt is even worse when there’s a threat of war, Asadi added: “I’m paying taxes to the government who purchases military equipment to bomb my parents in Iran … If war happens, what should I do?”Pirouz Kavehpour, a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), engineering professor, who is also Iranian American, said he had repeatedly seen his Iranian students lose access to their bank accounts due to sanctions, derailing their research and education.“It’s a daily stress … We’re international. We’re already on thin ice. If you don’t perform well, you will be sent back,” he said. “You’re a kid here and you need to live off fast food … and then you’re told by a random guy in a bank field office: ‘Don’t even think about getting the money.’”With a large wave of Iranian Americans arriving in the US after the 1979 revolution, some are also now inheriting family businesses or properties back in Iran from relatives who have died, but it is often a nightmare process to attempt and recoup the assets, said Erich Ferrari, a Washington DC-based attorney who handles sanctions cases.Even those who try to do everything right, reporting the transactions and getting proper licenses, can end up facing investigations by the US government, he said. Law enforcement monitors money transfers, and in some cases Iranian Americans have found the FBI at their doors asking questions: “There’s always a threat looming.”Ferrari said he had seen family relationships fall apart in the process, adding: “They are trying to do something that is beneficial to the US, and divest themselves from Iran and bring their money here.” Research and charity work thwarted: ‘How does the US benefit?’In addition to the recent wave of Iranian students who have been denied visas at the last minute, under sanctions law, faculty members are also barred from traveling to Iran for research or other work without approval from the US treasury department.“I’ve been invited many times to give a talk in Iran … but we are not allowed,” said Kavehpour, the UCLA professor. He noted that Iran could benefit from working with UCLA experts on autism research, but that it would be impossible to set up any collaboration.Aysan Rangchian, a 28-year-old Iranian PhD student at UCLA, said Iranian students often don’t even apply for conferences anywhere outside of the US for fear of consequences. Iranian students can also struggle to get grants and funding: “This is making the US less appealing for international students.”Last year, Iranian researchers faced criminal prosecution when they attempted to do stem-cell research in the US. As a result of that process, potentially groundbreaking science will not go forward here, said Yazdanyar: “How did the United States benefit from this?”Yazdanyar has also represented a not-for-profit organization that helps orphaned children across the world, including in Iran. Even when the group received a specific license to send aid to Iran, financial institutions in third countries have declined to assist with the transfer due to concerns about sanctions. That means humanitarian aid has been delayed and blocked, she said.During floods in Iran last year, it was painful that the sanctions blocked Iranian Americans from being able to offer basic donations, said Assal Rad, a research fellow with the National Iranian American Council, who lives in Orange county. She said that while the impact of sanctions on Iranian Americans paled in comparison with what Iranian citizens suffer, the rules added to this “constant feeling that your identity is under attack”.“Whether sanctions, the travel ban, or your loyalty being questioned … it’s really isolating,” she said, adding of sanctions: “It’s an ineffective policy that is also harming Americans themselves.”


Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycott

Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycottMalaysia will not take retaliatory trade action against India over its boycott of palm oil purchases amid a political row between the two countries, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said on Monday. "We are too small to take retaliatory action," Mahathir told reporters in Langkawi, a resort island off the western coast of Malaysia.


Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'

Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'President Trump has given a new justification for killing Qassem Soleimani, telling a gathering of Republican donors that the Iranian general was “saying bad things about our country.”


Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be Different

Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be DifferentThis second cold war, conducted on a teeming planet whose anxiety is intensified by the passions and rages of social media, is only in its beginning stages. The aim, like in the first Cold War, is negative victory: not defeating the Chinese, but waiting them out, just as we waited the Soviets out.


Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort Bragg

Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort BraggThe remains of a paratrooper who was killed a week ago in Afghanistan have been returned to his family in the U.S. The family of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin greeted his flag-draped casket at Pope Army Airfield at Fort Bragg on Saturday, The Fayetteville Observer reported. The 29-year-old from Newport News, Virginia, was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.


Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bid

Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bidStriving to extend its influence in the eastern Mediterranean where tensions revolve around energy resources, Turkey sees Cyprus as the weakest link in a regional alliance buffering Ankara's ambitions, analysts told AFP. The bid comes as Turkey flexes its muscle across the Mediterranean from Libya to Syria, where Ankara has taken on diplomatic and military roles. Although Turkish military action is not expected against Cyprus, analysts warn Ankara will increase pressure on Nicosia to deter it from completing its energy exploration plans.


Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the week

Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the weekAn area of high pressure building into the Northwest through Monday will briefly offer tranquil conditions before a storm system descends on the region by midweek.Quiet conditions over the Northwest have directed the storm track farther north into Pacific Canada, resulting in heavy rain and mountain snow in western British Columbia since last week.However, the next Pacific storm will take aim farther south, bringing wet weather back to the Northwest Monday night through Tuesday."Snow levels will be higher than with previous storms, so precipitation along the I-5 corridor from Seattle to Northern California will fall in the form of rain," AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Elliott said.Even though precipitation will fall as a plain rain, motorists may experience a slower Tuesday morning commute along the I-5 corridor. Along the coast, a building westerly swell will create the threat for sneaker waves along area beaches.Beachgoers are advised to stay away from the shoreline to avoid falling victim to these large waves.The threat for wet weather will extend eastward beyond the coastal lowlands and Cascades from the storm.Kennewick and Spokane, Washington, and even Boise, Idaho, can expect wet weather to develop during the day on Tuesday.This storm system is not expected to have snow levels as low as some of the recent systems. However, with levels initially around 3,000 feet, area passes such as Snoqualmie and Stevens could still face some travel issues from Tuesday into Wednesday.The persistent pattern of unsettled weather across the Cascades and northern Sierras will continue to keep an elevated avalanche threat in place this week.As the storm system tracks into the Intermountain West by Wednesday, dry and settled conditions will come to an end.Wintry weather is likely for places like Salt Lake City, Utah, and Yellowstone National Park. While major accumulations are not expected, it will prove beneficial for area ski resorts.AccuWeather meteorologists predict the unsettled pattern will likely continue into late week across the Northwest.A lack of Arctic intrusions will also continue to keep snow levels higher than average for this time of year.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair loss

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair lossPressley, who's been famous for her Senegalese twists, said she first started noticing patches of her hair falling out last fall. She's now bald.


Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a memento

Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a mementoA Montana man told authorities that he cut off a grizzly bear's claws as a memento after shooting it in self-defense because he was mad that the bear was going to eat him, according to court records. Bryan Berg, 35, appeared in court on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Missoula after pleading guilty to illegal transport of grizzly bear claws, a misdemeanor, according to the Flathead Beacon. Grizzly bears in northwestern Montana are classified as a threatened species.


‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidate

‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidateWe don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil Democrats are trying to choose a candidate to beat Donald Trump, the most corrupt president in history. Some think nominating Joe Biden, a moderate white man who calls himself “Middle Class” Joe, makes sense.But Biden has a big corruption problem and it makes him a weak candidate. I know it seems crazy, but a lot of the voters we need – independents and people who might stay home – will look at Biden and Trump and say: “They’re all dirty.”It looks like “Middle Class” Joe has perfected the art of taking big contributions, then representing his corporate donors at the cost of middle- and working-class Americans. Converting campaign contributions into legislative favors and policy positions isn’t being “moderate”. It is the kind of transactional politics Americans have come to loathe.There are three clear examples.First, Biden’s support for finance over working-class Americans. His career was bankrolled by the credit card industry. He delivered for it by spearheading a bankruptcy bill that made it harder for Americans to reduce their debts and helped cause the financial crisis. He not only authored and voted for that bill, he split with Barack Obama and led the battle to vote down Democratic amendments.His explanations for carrying water for the credit card industry have changed over time. They have never rung true.> Nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat TrumpThe simplest explanation is the most likely: he did it for his donors. At a fundraiser last year, Biden promised his Wall Street donors that “nothing would fundamentally change” for them if he became president. Now the financial world is raising huge money for his campaign. It clearly thinks he’s going to be its friend if elected. Most Americans, who get ripped off by the financial sector on a daily basis, aren’t looking for a candidate who has made their life harder.Second, healthcare. On 25 April, the day he announced his campaign, Biden went straight to a fundraiser co-hosted by the chief executive of a major health insurance corporation. He refuses to sign a pledge to reject money from insurance and pharma execs and continues to raise money from healthcare industry donors. His campaign is being bankrolled by a super Pac run by healthcare lobbyists.What did all these donors get? A healthcare proposal that preserves the power of the insurance industry and leaves 10 million Americans uninsured.Third, climate change. Biden signed a pledge not to take money from the fossil fuel industry, then broke his promise. Right after a CNN town hall on climate change, he held a fundraiser hosted by the founder of a fossil fuel conglomerate. He is pushing climate policy that has gotten dismal reviews from several leading environmental groups.There are plenty of other examples that raise questions, like housing and social security. Big real estate moguls are playing a major role in Biden’s campaign. Unlike his rivals, he has no comprehensive housing plan. When he pushed for cuts to Social Security, was he serving donors or his constituents?I can already hear the howls: But look at Trump! Trump is 1,000 times worse!You don’t need to convince me. I have spent my life writing about and fighting against corruption, and in America I have never seen anything like the current administration. In the last three years, I have made combatting Trump’s corruption the heart of my work.I was on the first lawsuit against him for corrupt constitutional violations and I ran for attorney general in New York on a platform of pointing out just how dangerous he is, and how important unused state laws are to stopping him. My work on corruption was cited in the House judiciary committee’s report on impeachment.> 2020 should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and crueltyBut here’s the thing: nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat Trump. It will allow Trump to muddy the water, to once again pretend he is the one “draining the swamp”, running against Washington culture. Trump and the Cambridge Analytica of 2020 will campaign, as they did in 2016, on a message of radical nihilism: everybody lies, everybody is corrupt, nothing matters, there is no truth.Corrupt politicians always use whataboutism. With Biden, we are basically handing Trump a whataboutism playbook. The comparison won’t be fair, but if you think he won’t use Biden’s closeness to donors as a cudgel to try to keep people home, you haven’t been paying attention. Unlike Democrats, who must give voters a reason to come out, Trump doesn’t need voters to love him. He just needs to convince people the whole game is ugly.Whether or not Biden is making choices to please donors, there is no doubt his record represents the transactional, grossly corrupt culture in Washington that long precedes Trump. We cannot allow Trump to so lower our standards that we aren’t even allowed to call out that culture, which has not only stymied progress but also harmed the Democratic party.The good news is that we still have time to break with this culture of corruption. We don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil. The 2020 election should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and cruelty.We have a rare opportunity to end a larger culture of corruption and we should take it – we will regret it if we don’t. * Zephyr Teachout, an associate professor at Fordham Law School, is the author of Corruption in America: From Ben Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United. Her next book is Break ’Em Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money. She has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president.


Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte dies

Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte diesLotte Group founder Shin Kyuk-ho, who started manufacturing chewing gum in 1948 in Japan and built the business into South Korea's No.5 conglomerate with interests ranging from retail to chemicals, died on Sunday, the company said. Lotte was founded in 1948 as a chewing gum maker in Japan by Shin, who moved to the neighbouring country when the Korean peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule.


Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trial

Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trialCruz has argued that if witnesses will be allowed in the upcoming Senate impeachment trial, a rule of reciprocity should be implemented.


ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'

ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'Federal authorities are turning to a new tactic in the escalating conflict over New York City's so-called sanctuary policies, issuing four “immigration subpoenas” to the city for information about inmates wanted for deportation. “This is not a request — it's a demand,” Henry Lucero, a senior U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official, told The Associated Press. Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration said Saturday the city would review the subpoenas.


Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt Floor

Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt FloorTwo more bodies have been discovered at a Tijuana, Mexico, property where investigators earlier found the remains of a missing California couple buried under the dirt floor of a house on Friday. Jesús Rubén López Guillén, 70, a U.S. resident, and his wife Maria Teresa Guillén, 65, a naturalized U.S. citizen, were reported missing by their daughter Norma López after they traveled from Garden Grove to Tijuana on Jan. 10 to collect more than $6,400 in overdue rent from their 37-year-old son-in-law. Police in Garden Grove launched a missing persons investigation after López said she could no longer track her parents’ movements through the Find My Phone app. She said the last signal she received before their phone went dead was at the property they owned where her husband was living in southern Tijuana, about 4 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their bodies were found buried under the dirt floor of one of the property’s three homes late Friday.While conducting an investigation into the circumstances of the Guilléns’ murder, Mexican investigators say they discovered the bodies of another couple buried in the property. It is not known if they were found in the same house as the Guilléns’ remains. The new victims have not yet been identified, but police in Mexico say they also may have been involved in a monetary dispute with the son-in-law.The son-in-law, a Mexican national who was deported from the U.S. in 2012 and identified only as “Santiago” in court documents, was first charged with the California couple’s disappearance and taken into custody while the property was searched. Baja California state prosecutor Hirán Sánchez confirmed that when his in-law’s bodies were found, he was charged with their murder.Sanchez told reporters that when the son-in-law was first questioned about what happened to his in-laws, he offered up a “series of contradictions” including a tale that they had walked across the border and that he had picked them up. López says her parents had instead driven their own pickup truck to retrieve the money. The son-in-law also told police that he first took them to their property and then they went together to a bank to exchange currency he paid them, after which he said he drove them back to the border. Instead investigators say that the son-in-law tried to extract money with the couple’s bank cards.“The Guilléns drove themselves to their houses, not Santiago,” Sanchez said at a news conference. “They never left.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ river

Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ riverVanessa Smallwood of Maple Shade, N.J., was 46 at the time of her disappearance. She was identified in a statement from New Jersey State Police.


Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigation

Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigationPresident Trump's latest Russia expert has reportedly been escorted from the White House amid claims of a security-related investigation.


California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over School

California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over SchoolThe teachers felt “sick, dizzy and nauseated” after being covered with the fuel


Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this long

Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this longWomen could've fought for the ERA long before now, but too many chose political ideology over enshrining protections in the U.S. Constitution.


The 25 Best PSP Games

The 25 Best PSP Games


Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shut

Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shutA restive volcano in the Philippines has a high risk of eruption as it is "recharging" with fresh magma and rising emissions of toxic gas, a top scientist said on Monday, while authorities ordered commercial establishments to stay shut. Earthquakes were still happening at the Taal volcano, which shot giant clouds of ash miles into the air on Jan. 12, and levels of the gas were rising, a sign of magma "recharging" and "resupplying" beneath it, a Philippine vulcanologist said. "If it reaches the crater, it could cause a strong explosion," Renato Solidum, director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), told DZMM radio.


Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on board

Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on boardWorkers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.


Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across border

Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across borderAdolfo Cardenas smiles faintly at the memory of traveling with his 14-year-old son from Honduras to the U.S.-Mexico border in only nine days, riding buses and paying a smuggler $6,000 to ensure passage through highway checkpoints. Father and son walked about 10 minutes in Arizona's stifling June heat before surrendering to border agents. Instead of being released with paperwork to appear in immigration court in Dallas, where Cardenas hopes to live with a cousin, they were bused more than an hour to wait in the Mexican border city of Mexicali.


Battle over impeachment witnesses escalates

Battle over impeachment witnesses escalatesKey players in President Donald Trump’s impending trial amplified their arguments on the Sunday news shows.


China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?

China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?World War III is no joke...


Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sources

Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sourcesAt least 70 Yemeni soldiers have been killed in a missile attack launched by Huthi rebels on a mosque in the central province of Marib, medical and military sources said Sunday. The Huthis attacked a mosque in a military camp in Marib -- about 170 kilometres (105 miles) east of Sanaa -- during evening prayers on Saturday, military sources told AFP.


'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-Ed

'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-EdChesley “Sully” Sullenberger opened up about his past struggles with stuttering in defending Biden and his speech.


Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek

Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. received intelligence about a potentially imminent attack being planned against military personnel stationed in Germany, Newsweek reported, citing a memo it saw.The 66th Military Intelligence Brigade received third party information stating that a possible attack could occur against soldiers at either Tower Barracks in Grafenwohr or Tower Barracks, Dulmen; the exact location, date and time of possible attack was unknown Information was marked unclassified and from a senior U.S. intelligence official “The source of information stated the attack would be carried out by an unknown Jordanian extremist currently located in Germany near an unknown military base,” the report saidU.S. Army Europe confirmed to Newsweek that a potential threat was identified and investigated last night “German and US officials were consulted and no imminent threat was found to exit”To view the source of this information click hereTo contact the reporter on this story: Nathan Crooks in Miami at ncrooks@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sebastian Tong at stong41@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireball

SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireballA SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.


Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TV

Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TVIran considers dual nationals aboard a Ukrainian plane that was shot down accidentally this month to be Iranian citizens, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said on Monday. Iran does not recognize dual nationality. Many of the 176 people killed in the disaster were Iranians with dual citizenship.


A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the Midwest

A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the MidwestAuthorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.


2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-in

2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-inGov. Wanda Vázquez fired the heads of Puerto Rico’s housing and family departments Sunday in the latest fallout over the discovery of a warehouse filled with emergency supplies dating from Hurricane Maria. The removal of Housing Secretary Fernando Gil and Department of Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar came a day after the governor fired the director of Puerto Rico’s emergency management agency. Vázquez fired him hours after a Facebook video showed angry people breaking into the warehouse in an area where thousands have been in shelters since a recent earthquake.


Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekend

Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekendThe Senate impeachment trial is set to begin on Tuesday in Washington.


Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class Submarines

Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class SubmarinesThe class seems to have overcome its technical and financial problems, although the lingering impact of those issues could affect not only future classes of SSNs, but also the UK’s commitment to building a new class of SSBNs.


Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expires

Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expiresThousands of Iraqi anti-government protesters grappled with security forces in a bid to shut streets across the country on Monday, a deadline they had given authorities to implement long-awaited reforms. Rallies have rocked Iraq since October but fearing they would lose momentum amid spiralling regional tensions protesters last Monday told the government it had one week to meet their demands or they would escalate. Late Sunday young protesters began sealing off highways and bridges across the capital Baghdad and Iraq's south, torching tyres and setting up makeshift barricades.


China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virus

China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reported 17 new cases of the mysterious SARS-like virus on Sunday, including three people in serious condition, heightening fears ahead of China's Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of people move around the country. The new coronavirus strain has caused alarm because of its connection to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003. Of the 17 new cases in the central city of Wuhan -- believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak -- three were described as "severe", of which two patients were too critical to be moved, authorities said.


TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agent

TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agentTara Houska ‘humiliated’ by TSA agent who ‘snapped my braids like reins’ during screening at Minneapolis-St Paul airportThe federal Transportation Security Administration has apologized to a Native American woman who said an agent at Minneapolis-St Paul international airport “pulled her braids” and said “giddy up!” when she took a flight from there this week.“The agent said she needed to pat down my braids,” tweeted Tara Houska, an indigenous rights advocate and attorney. “She pulled them behind my shoulders, laughed and said ‘giddyup!’ as she snapped my braids like reins. My hair is part of my spirit. I am a Native woman. I am angry, humiliated. Your ‘fun’ hurt.”Houska, who is Ojibwe, added: “When I informed the middle-aged blonde woman who had casually used her authority to dehumanize and disrespect me, she said, ‘Well it was just in fun, I’m sorry. Your hair is lovely.’“That is NOT an apology and it is NOT OK.”According to the Washington Post, women of color have long experienced problems at TSA checkpoints, because natural, braided or twisted hair prompt “flags” on security devices, spurring “more invasive screenings”.Bring Me The News, a Minnesota website, appeared to have been first to report Houska’s experience.In a statement to the Guardian, the TSA said it had been “made aware of allegations made by a traveler about her screening experience at Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport [on] Monday morning.“TSA officials investigated the incident and on Tuesday afternoon, TSA’s federal security director for Minnesota, Cliff Van Leuven, spoke with the traveler. He apologized for actions and a comment that were insensitive and made by a TSA officer to the traveler during the screening experience.”Van Leuven also wrote to airport staff.“In the news last night and today,” he said, “you’ve likely seen – or heard – of a TSA officer at MSP who was insensitive in screening the long braided hair of a Native American passenger Monday morning. Did it actually happen? Yes. Exactly as described? Yes.“This morning, I reached out to the passenger via email. She called me back early this afternoon. I apologized for how she was treated during the screening of her braids – and we had a very pleasant conversation.“She reiterated that she doesn’t want the officer to get in trouble, but she is hoping we’ll take the chance to continue to educate our staff about the many Native American Tribes/Bands in our state and region to better understand their culture.”The airport apologized on Twitter.Houska could not immediately be reached for comment.


El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughter

El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughterThe mug shot of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, imprisoned leader of the ruthless Sinaloa Cartel, is not just for police blotters anymore.


Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'

Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will need to be protected at taxpayers’ expense against the threat of terror attacks and kidnap for years to come, security experts have said. Police and former security chiefs fear the couple will continue to be at risk from organised terror groups, political fanatics and lone obsessives long after they separate from the Royal family. Talks are understood to be taking place at senior levels over the best way of providing protection for Meghan and Prince Harry as they divide their time between Britain and their new life in North America. But there are fears among some experts that palace and government officials may be underestimating both the potential threat and what is required to protect the couple against it. Dai Davies, who was Head of Royal Protection from 1994 to 1998 and former Chief Superintendent (Divisional Commander) Metropolitan Police Service, said: “We have to learn the lessons of history and act on them. Anyone in charge of security has to think the impossible and then think it again and I fear there is not enough of that going on by the experts currently in charge. “One thing you can be sure of is that terrorists and others who pose a threat are thinking about it all the time.” Mr Davies said the three main threats come from jihadist terrorists targeting Prince Harry, who also served in Afghanistan; lone ‘fixateds’ and royal obsessives; and right wing extremists with an hatred of Meghan as a woman of colour marrying into the royal family. Minister and senior police officers are thought to be determined to avoid the mistakes made over Diana, Princess of Wales, who in 1993 turned down publicly funded police protection except when she was with her sons William and Harry or staying at Kensington Palace. That left her relying on private security at other times, leading to her being in the hands of the Ritz Hotel’s head of security Herni Paul on the night she died when their car crashed in the Pont de l'Alma underpass as he tried to evade photographers following Diana. Her bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones was badly injured in the crash, on 31 August 1997. Ken Wharfe, who served as Diana's royal protection officer for six years, resigned from the position in 1993, has since said that if he and his team were working with the Princess in 1997, they may have been able to prevent her death.  Mr Davies, who said there have been far more plots against the Royals than publicly acknowledged, added: “We don't want the situation where Harry and Meghan are being followed, without protection, by paparazzi or people with a fixation and we need to be sure that protection is of the highest level.” But he added that the high cost of providing security may cause resentment among British taxpayers if the Sussexes begin to earn large sums of private income outside of any Royal duties they continue to carry out. “The question is whether the British public will wear the cost of security, even if it is miniscule in real terms, over a long period,” said Mr Davies, who was in charge of protection for the Queen and the Royal family throughout the UK and worldwide. Lord West of Spithead, who was a security minister from 2007 to 2010, said that Harry and Meghan would be expected to make a contribution towards the cost of their security should they start earning a large amount of private income. But he said there was no question that high levels of police protection would have to be provided by the British government into the future. “We have got an obligation to provide security for one of the Queen’s sons and his family and that’s a long term obligation,” he said. “It would be nice to work out an arrangement with the Canadians, but we can’t not provide that protection ourselves, regardless. Mike Penning MP, who was police minister from 2014 to 2016 and went on to serve as justice and Armed Forces minister, said: “It doesn’t matter who they are, if they are at risk we have a duty to protect them, it’s as simple as that. That requirement should be based on any risk assessment made by our intelligence services and by the Canadians.”


The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the world

The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the worldThere's something powerful about finally seeing a famous landmark or natural wonder in person instead of on a postcard (or on Instagram).


Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in Panama

Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in PanamaA religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.


US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwise

US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwiseThe U.S. ambassador to South Korea has some unusual explanations for the harsh criticism he's faced in his host country. Or a Japanese ancestry that raises unpleasant reminders of Japan's former colonial domination of Korea? Many South Koreans, however, have a more straight-forward explanation for Harry Harris' struggle to win hearts and minds in Seoul, and it's got more to do with an outspoken manner that they see as undiplomatic and rude.


Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial

Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial(Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violent

Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violentA prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activist was arrested by police, his organization said on Monday, after a protest he helped organize in the financial district a day earlier turned violent with officers firing tear gas to disperse the crowds. Ventus Lau was arrested on Sunday evening on charges of "obstruction of police administration" and violating terms set when permission was granted for the protest, the Hong Kong Civil Assembly Team said in a statement. "It was primarily rioters' violent acts which led to the suspension of the gathering," Senior Superintendent Ng Lok-chun told reporters.


Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at Sobibor

Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at SobiborNew photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there. Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011. According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give "detailed insight" into the camp in German-occupied Poland.


Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants

Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants“This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”


Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang region

Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang regionA strong earthquake damaged buildings and injured at least one person seriously in China's far west Xinjiang region, the government said Monday. Rescue teams were sent to Peyzawat county, an area east of the city of Kashgar, after the Sunday night quake. State broadcaster CCTV showed a cluster of small collapsed brick buildings and partially fallen walls that fronted properties along the street.


Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assets

Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assetsAfrica’s richest woman has been accused of corruption and exploiting her own country’s natural resources, after thousands of documents detailing her business interests were leaked to the media. Isabel dos Santos, who resides in the UK and whose father was the president of Angola, faces allegations of exploiting family connections to secure deals on land, oil and diamonds. According to the documents, seen by BBC Panorama and the Guardian, she and her husband were allowed to buy up valuable state assets and siphon hundreds of millions of dollars out of Angola. Ms dos Santos, whose fortune is estimated at £2bn, says these claims are entirely false and that she is the victim of a witch-hunt led by the Angolan government. She also wrote on Twitter that the leaked documents were “fake” and based on “false information.”     Ms dos Santos is already under investigation for corruption by the Angolan government, which has frozen her assets in the country. The documents were obtained by the Platform to Protect Whistle-blowers in Africa and then passed to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Anti-corruption campaigners responded by claiming that Ms dos Santos has been exploiting her own country for personal gain, with normal Angolan citizens the victims of her lavish lifestyle. "Every time she appears on the cover of some glossy magazine somewhere in the world, every time that she hosts one of her glamorous parties in the south of France, she is doing so by trampling on the aspirations of the citizens of Angola,” Andrew Feinstein, the head of Corruption Watch, told the BBC. In an interview with the BBC following the leak, Ms dos Santos said: “I regret that Angola has chosen this path, I think that we all stand a lot to lose. “Now, when you look at my track record and you see the work I have done and look at all the companies I have built, most certainly my companies are commercial companies.   “If you tell me, is there anything wrong for an Angolan person to have a business venture with a state company, I think there is nothing wrong.” She added that she was facing “prejudice” due to being the daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, who served as President of Angola from 1979 to 2017. Ms dos Santos was educated in the UK and is married to Sindika Dokolo, a Congolese art collector and businessman.


A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million years

A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million yearsA photo of a piece of petrified wood has been shared across the Internet, but no one knows who took it or why it's such a rock star.


A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto Rico

A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto RicoKaylen Ward says she raised $1 million for Australia, sending nudes to people who donated. Now she is doing the same, raising money for Puerto Rico.


S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from China

S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from ChinaSouth Korea on Monday confirmed its first case of the SARS-like virus that is spreading in China, as concerns mount about a wider outbreak. A 35-year-old Chinese woman who flew in from Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was confirmed to have the new coronavirus strain, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said. "She was visiting Seoul on a tour for the Lunar New Year holidays," said KCDC director Jung Eun-kyeong, adding Korean authorities were investigating her movement on the plane and those who might have come in contact with her, including flight attendants.


Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian Americans

Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian AmericansAs penalties create hardship for Iran’s residents, Iranians in US also suffer consequences: ‘The sanctions are still chasing me’Following the US assassination of a top Iranian general earlier this month and Iranian airstrikes against US military bases in Iraq, Donald Trump once again imposed biting sanctions against the regime in Tehran. To Iranian Americans, many of whom have lived under sanctions in Iran or have family members there suffering through economic hardship, the fresh round of penalties is a painful reminder of the collateral consequences of escalating conflict.Iranian Americans across the United States told the Guardian about their worries for their family members and friends affected by US sanctions. And they spoke of the ways the policies affect their own lives, work and communities in the US. “I was raised under sanctions my entire life,” said Nazanin Asadi, 34, who left Iran for California in 2014 and now works as a law clerk in Orange county. “After moving to the US permanently, I can’t believe the sanctions and these laws are still chasing me … I don’t want my community to suffer.”The threats of a full-blown war following Trump’s 3 January order to kill Gen Qassem Suleimani caused anxiety among some Persian communities in the US, especially for Iranian families who have been torn apart by Trump’s travel ban. Trump backed away from additional strikes, but his administration implemented a fresh wave of sanctions, targeting senior Iranian officials and the country’s textile, construction, manufacturing and other sectors.The US has imposed sanctions for decades, targeting Iran’s energy sector and a range of exports of goods and services. Trump had already expanded sanctions against Iran in 2018 with his withdrawal from the nuclear deal signed under Barack Obama.Under sanctions law, people are forced to apply for specific licenses when they seek to be exempted from prohibited transactions, and even for allowed activities, there are complicated reporting requirements. In practice that means hundreds of thousands of Iranian Americans with family and financial ties to Iran can face a complex set of burdens and hurdles in their lives, jobs and education.“These sanctions are supposed to be targeting the government of Iran and certain individuals, but end up targeting the average person and your own citizens,” said Mehrnoush Yazdanyar, a California attorney who helps Iranian Americans navigate sanctions. “You’re sanctioning your own legal permanent residents, and in doing so, you’re alienating them.” ‘It is a daily stress’Yazdanyar’s law offices in southern California, a region home to the largest Iranian population outside of Iran, have assisted thousands of clients in sanctions-related matters over the years. Families often can’t send money back and forth, creating significant hurdles for Iranian Americans who want to support their parents or families in Iran who want to help their loved ones pursue their education or other dreams in America.While the regulations are supposed to allow some financial transactions through third parties, many attempting to navigate the process can end up in legal trouble or with closed or frozen bank accounts, she said.Asadi, who grew up in Iran, was accepted to the University of Southern California law school and moved here with dreams of becoming a judge. But with the sanctions blocking her parents from offering her financial support, she had to pay her own way through her education, working multiple jobs while studying.“I couldn’t afford my life, I couldn’t pay my expenses,” she said. “It was too much pressure emotionally and financially.”She scraped by and managed to graduate, and she now works with Yazdanyar helping people dealing with sanctions. But when Asadi wants to help her own parents in Iran, who are disabled, she has no way to offer them funds, pay for their medications or even buy them gifts: “We cannot support each other.”That feeling of guilt is even worse when there’s a threat of war, Asadi added: “I’m paying taxes to the government who purchases military equipment to bomb my parents in Iran … If war happens, what should I do?”Pirouz Kavehpour, a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), engineering professor, who is also Iranian American, said he had repeatedly seen his Iranian students lose access to their bank accounts due to sanctions, derailing their research and education.“It’s a daily stress … We’re international. We’re already on thin ice. If you don’t perform well, you will be sent back,” he said. “You’re a kid here and you need to live off fast food … and then you’re told by a random guy in a bank field office: ‘Don’t even think about getting the money.’”With a large wave of Iranian Americans arriving in the US after the 1979 revolution, some are also now inheriting family businesses or properties back in Iran from relatives who have died, but it is often a nightmare process to attempt and recoup the assets, said Erich Ferrari, a Washington DC-based attorney who handles sanctions cases.Even those who try to do everything right, reporting the transactions and getting proper licenses, can end up facing investigations by the US government, he said. Law enforcement monitors money transfers, and in some cases Iranian Americans have found the FBI at their doors asking questions: “There’s always a threat looming.”Ferrari said he had seen family relationships fall apart in the process, adding: “They are trying to do something that is beneficial to the US, and divest themselves from Iran and bring their money here.” Research and charity work thwarted: ‘How does the US benefit?’In addition to the recent wave of Iranian students who have been denied visas at the last minute, under sanctions law, faculty members are also barred from traveling to Iran for research or other work without approval from the US treasury department.“I’ve been invited many times to give a talk in Iran … but we are not allowed,” said Kavehpour, the UCLA professor. He noted that Iran could benefit from working with UCLA experts on autism research, but that it would be impossible to set up any collaboration.Aysan Rangchian, a 28-year-old Iranian PhD student at UCLA, said Iranian students often don’t even apply for conferences anywhere outside of the US for fear of consequences. Iranian students can also struggle to get grants and funding: “This is making the US less appealing for international students.”Last year, Iranian researchers faced criminal prosecution when they attempted to do stem-cell research in the US. As a result of that process, potentially groundbreaking science will not go forward here, said Yazdanyar: “How did the United States benefit from this?”Yazdanyar has also represented a not-for-profit organization that helps orphaned children across the world, including in Iran. Even when the group received a specific license to send aid to Iran, financial institutions in third countries have declined to assist with the transfer due to concerns about sanctions. That means humanitarian aid has been delayed and blocked, she said.During floods in Iran last year, it was painful that the sanctions blocked Iranian Americans from being able to offer basic donations, said Assal Rad, a research fellow with the National Iranian American Council, who lives in Orange county. She said that while the impact of sanctions on Iranian Americans paled in comparison with what Iranian citizens suffer, the rules added to this “constant feeling that your identity is under attack”.“Whether sanctions, the travel ban, or your loyalty being questioned … it’s really isolating,” she said, adding of sanctions: “It’s an ineffective policy that is also harming Americans themselves.”


Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycott

Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycottMalaysia will not take retaliatory trade action against India over its boycott of palm oil purchases amid a political row between the two countries, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said on Monday. "We are too small to take retaliatory action," Mahathir told reporters in Langkawi, a resort island off the western coast of Malaysia.


Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'

Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'President Trump has given a new justification for killing Qassem Soleimani, telling a gathering of Republican donors that the Iranian general was “saying bad things about our country.”


Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be Different

Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be DifferentThis second cold war, conducted on a teeming planet whose anxiety is intensified by the passions and rages of social media, is only in its beginning stages. The aim, like in the first Cold War, is negative victory: not defeating the Chinese, but waiting them out, just as we waited the Soviets out.


Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort Bragg

Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort BraggThe remains of a paratrooper who was killed a week ago in Afghanistan have been returned to his family in the U.S. The family of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin greeted his flag-draped casket at Pope Army Airfield at Fort Bragg on Saturday, The Fayetteville Observer reported. The 29-year-old from Newport News, Virginia, was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.


Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bid

Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bidStriving to extend its influence in the eastern Mediterranean where tensions revolve around energy resources, Turkey sees Cyprus as the weakest link in a regional alliance buffering Ankara's ambitions, analysts told AFP. The bid comes as Turkey flexes its muscle across the Mediterranean from Libya to Syria, where Ankara has taken on diplomatic and military roles. Although Turkish military action is not expected against Cyprus, analysts warn Ankara will increase pressure on Nicosia to deter it from completing its energy exploration plans.


Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the week

Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the weekAn area of high pressure building into the Northwest through Monday will briefly offer tranquil conditions before a storm system descends on the region by midweek.Quiet conditions over the Northwest have directed the storm track farther north into Pacific Canada, resulting in heavy rain and mountain snow in western British Columbia since last week.However, the next Pacific storm will take aim farther south, bringing wet weather back to the Northwest Monday night through Tuesday."Snow levels will be higher than with previous storms, so precipitation along the I-5 corridor from Seattle to Northern California will fall in the form of rain," AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Elliott said.Even though precipitation will fall as a plain rain, motorists may experience a slower Tuesday morning commute along the I-5 corridor. Along the coast, a building westerly swell will create the threat for sneaker waves along area beaches.Beachgoers are advised to stay away from the shoreline to avoid falling victim to these large waves.The threat for wet weather will extend eastward beyond the coastal lowlands and Cascades from the storm.Kennewick and Spokane, Washington, and even Boise, Idaho, can expect wet weather to develop during the day on Tuesday.This storm system is not expected to have snow levels as low as some of the recent systems. However, with levels initially around 3,000 feet, area passes such as Snoqualmie and Stevens could still face some travel issues from Tuesday into Wednesday.The persistent pattern of unsettled weather across the Cascades and northern Sierras will continue to keep an elevated avalanche threat in place this week.As the storm system tracks into the Intermountain West by Wednesday, dry and settled conditions will come to an end.Wintry weather is likely for places like Salt Lake City, Utah, and Yellowstone National Park. While major accumulations are not expected, it will prove beneficial for area ski resorts.AccuWeather meteorologists predict the unsettled pattern will likely continue into late week across the Northwest.A lack of Arctic intrusions will also continue to keep snow levels higher than average for this time of year.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair loss

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair lossPressley, who's been famous for her Senegalese twists, said she first started noticing patches of her hair falling out last fall. She's now bald.


Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a memento

Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a mementoA Montana man told authorities that he cut off a grizzly bear's claws as a memento after shooting it in self-defense because he was mad that the bear was going to eat him, according to court records. Bryan Berg, 35, appeared in court on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Missoula after pleading guilty to illegal transport of grizzly bear claws, a misdemeanor, according to the Flathead Beacon. Grizzly bears in northwestern Montana are classified as a threatened species.


‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidate

‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidateWe don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil Democrats are trying to choose a candidate to beat Donald Trump, the most corrupt president in history. Some think nominating Joe Biden, a moderate white man who calls himself “Middle Class” Joe, makes sense.But Biden has a big corruption problem and it makes him a weak candidate. I know it seems crazy, but a lot of the voters we need – independents and people who might stay home – will look at Biden and Trump and say: “They’re all dirty.”It looks like “Middle Class” Joe has perfected the art of taking big contributions, then representing his corporate donors at the cost of middle- and working-class Americans. Converting campaign contributions into legislative favors and policy positions isn’t being “moderate”. It is the kind of transactional politics Americans have come to loathe.There are three clear examples.First, Biden’s support for finance over working-class Americans. His career was bankrolled by the credit card industry. He delivered for it by spearheading a bankruptcy bill that made it harder for Americans to reduce their debts and helped cause the financial crisis. He not only authored and voted for that bill, he split with Barack Obama and led the battle to vote down Democratic amendments.His explanations for carrying water for the credit card industry have changed over time. They have never rung true.> Nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat TrumpThe simplest explanation is the most likely: he did it for his donors. At a fundraiser last year, Biden promised his Wall Street donors that “nothing would fundamentally change” for them if he became president. Now the financial world is raising huge money for his campaign. It clearly thinks he’s going to be its friend if elected. Most Americans, who get ripped off by the financial sector on a daily basis, aren’t looking for a candidate who has made their life harder.Second, healthcare. On 25 April, the day he announced his campaign, Biden went straight to a fundraiser co-hosted by the chief executive of a major health insurance corporation. He refuses to sign a pledge to reject money from insurance and pharma execs and continues to raise money from healthcare industry donors. His campaign is being bankrolled by a super Pac run by healthcare lobbyists.What did all these donors get? A healthcare proposal that preserves the power of the insurance industry and leaves 10 million Americans uninsured.Third, climate change. Biden signed a pledge not to take money from the fossil fuel industry, then broke his promise. Right after a CNN town hall on climate change, he held a fundraiser hosted by the founder of a fossil fuel conglomerate. He is pushing climate policy that has gotten dismal reviews from several leading environmental groups.There are plenty of other examples that raise questions, like housing and social security. Big real estate moguls are playing a major role in Biden’s campaign. Unlike his rivals, he has no comprehensive housing plan. When he pushed for cuts to Social Security, was he serving donors or his constituents?I can already hear the howls: But look at Trump! Trump is 1,000 times worse!You don’t need to convince me. I have spent my life writing about and fighting against corruption, and in America I have never seen anything like the current administration. In the last three years, I have made combatting Trump’s corruption the heart of my work.I was on the first lawsuit against him for corrupt constitutional violations and I ran for attorney general in New York on a platform of pointing out just how dangerous he is, and how important unused state laws are to stopping him. My work on corruption was cited in the House judiciary committee’s report on impeachment.> 2020 should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and crueltyBut here’s the thing: nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat Trump. It will allow Trump to muddy the water, to once again pretend he is the one “draining the swamp”, running against Washington culture. Trump and the Cambridge Analytica of 2020 will campaign, as they did in 2016, on a message of radical nihilism: everybody lies, everybody is corrupt, nothing matters, there is no truth.Corrupt politicians always use whataboutism. With Biden, we are basically handing Trump a whataboutism playbook. The comparison won’t be fair, but if you think he won’t use Biden’s closeness to donors as a cudgel to try to keep people home, you haven’t been paying attention. Unlike Democrats, who must give voters a reason to come out, Trump doesn’t need voters to love him. He just needs to convince people the whole game is ugly.Whether or not Biden is making choices to please donors, there is no doubt his record represents the transactional, grossly corrupt culture in Washington that long precedes Trump. We cannot allow Trump to so lower our standards that we aren’t even allowed to call out that culture, which has not only stymied progress but also harmed the Democratic party.The good news is that we still have time to break with this culture of corruption. We don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil. The 2020 election should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and cruelty.We have a rare opportunity to end a larger culture of corruption and we should take it – we will regret it if we don’t. * Zephyr Teachout, an associate professor at Fordham Law School, is the author of Corruption in America: From Ben Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United. Her next book is Break ’Em Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money. She has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president.


Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte dies

Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte diesLotte Group founder Shin Kyuk-ho, who started manufacturing chewing gum in 1948 in Japan and built the business into South Korea's No.5 conglomerate with interests ranging from retail to chemicals, died on Sunday, the company said. Lotte was founded in 1948 as a chewing gum maker in Japan by Shin, who moved to the neighbouring country when the Korean peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule.


Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trial

Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trialCruz has argued that if witnesses will be allowed in the upcoming Senate impeachment trial, a rule of reciprocity should be implemented.


ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'

ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'Federal authorities are turning to a new tactic in the escalating conflict over New York City's so-called sanctuary policies, issuing four “immigration subpoenas” to the city for information about inmates wanted for deportation. “This is not a request — it's a demand,” Henry Lucero, a senior U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official, told The Associated Press. Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration said Saturday the city would review the subpoenas.


Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt Floor

Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt FloorTwo more bodies have been discovered at a Tijuana, Mexico, property where investigators earlier found the remains of a missing California couple buried under the dirt floor of a house on Friday. Jesús Rubén López Guillén, 70, a U.S. resident, and his wife Maria Teresa Guillén, 65, a naturalized U.S. citizen, were reported missing by their daughter Norma López after they traveled from Garden Grove to Tijuana on Jan. 10 to collect more than $6,400 in overdue rent from their 37-year-old son-in-law. Police in Garden Grove launched a missing persons investigation after López said she could no longer track her parents’ movements through the Find My Phone app. She said the last signal she received before their phone went dead was at the property they owned where her husband was living in southern Tijuana, about 4 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their bodies were found buried under the dirt floor of one of the property’s three homes late Friday.While conducting an investigation into the circumstances of the Guilléns’ murder, Mexican investigators say they discovered the bodies of another couple buried in the property. It is not known if they were found in the same house as the Guilléns’ remains. The new victims have not yet been identified, but police in Mexico say they also may have been involved in a monetary dispute with the son-in-law.The son-in-law, a Mexican national who was deported from the U.S. in 2012 and identified only as “Santiago” in court documents, was first charged with the California couple’s disappearance and taken into custody while the property was searched. Baja California state prosecutor Hirán Sánchez confirmed that when his in-law’s bodies were found, he was charged with their murder.Sanchez told reporters that when the son-in-law was first questioned about what happened to his in-laws, he offered up a “series of contradictions” including a tale that they had walked across the border and that he had picked them up. López says her parents had instead driven their own pickup truck to retrieve the money. The son-in-law also told police that he first took them to their property and then they went together to a bank to exchange currency he paid them, after which he said he drove them back to the border. Instead investigators say that the son-in-law tried to extract money with the couple’s bank cards.“The Guilléns drove themselves to their houses, not Santiago,” Sanchez said at a news conference. “They never left.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ river

Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ riverVanessa Smallwood of Maple Shade, N.J., was 46 at the time of her disappearance. She was identified in a statement from New Jersey State Police.


Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigation

Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigationPresident Trump's latest Russia expert has reportedly been escorted from the White House amid claims of a security-related investigation.


California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over School

California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over SchoolThe teachers felt “sick, dizzy and nauseated” after being covered with the fuel


Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this long

Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this longWomen could've fought for the ERA long before now, but too many chose political ideology over enshrining protections in the U.S. Constitution.


The 25 Best PSP Games

The 25 Best PSP Games


Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shut

Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shutA restive volcano in the Philippines has a high risk of eruption as it is "recharging" with fresh magma and rising emissions of toxic gas, a top scientist said on Monday, while authorities ordered commercial establishments to stay shut. Earthquakes were still happening at the Taal volcano, which shot giant clouds of ash miles into the air on Jan. 12, and levels of the gas were rising, a sign of magma "recharging" and "resupplying" beneath it, a Philippine vulcanologist said. "If it reaches the crater, it could cause a strong explosion," Renato Solidum, director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), told DZMM radio.


Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on board

Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on boardWorkers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.


Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across border

Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across borderAdolfo Cardenas smiles faintly at the memory of traveling with his 14-year-old son from Honduras to the U.S.-Mexico border in only nine days, riding buses and paying a smuggler $6,000 to ensure passage through highway checkpoints. Father and son walked about 10 minutes in Arizona's stifling June heat before surrendering to border agents. Instead of being released with paperwork to appear in immigration court in Dallas, where Cardenas hopes to live with a cousin, they were bused more than an hour to wait in the Mexican border city of Mexicali.


Battle over impeachment witnesses escalates

Battle over impeachment witnesses escalatesKey players in President Donald Trump’s impending trial amplified their arguments on the Sunday news shows.


China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?

China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?World War III is no joke...


Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sources

Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sourcesAt least 70 Yemeni soldiers have been killed in a missile attack launched by Huthi rebels on a mosque in the central province of Marib, medical and military sources said Sunday. The Huthis attacked a mosque in a military camp in Marib -- about 170 kilometres (105 miles) east of Sanaa -- during evening prayers on Saturday, military sources told AFP.


'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-Ed

'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-EdChesley “Sully” Sullenberger opened up about his past struggles with stuttering in defending Biden and his speech.


Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek

Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. received intelligence about a potentially imminent attack being planned against military personnel stationed in Germany, Newsweek reported, citing a memo it saw.The 66th Military Intelligence Brigade received third party information stating that a possible attack could occur against soldiers at either Tower Barracks in Grafenwohr or Tower Barracks, Dulmen; the exact location, date and time of possible attack was unknown Information was marked unclassified and from a senior U.S. intelligence official “The source of information stated the attack would be carried out by an unknown Jordanian extremist currently located in Germany near an unknown military base,” the report saidU.S. Army Europe confirmed to Newsweek that a potential threat was identified and investigated last night “German and US officials were consulted and no imminent threat was found to exit”To view the source of this information click hereTo contact the reporter on this story: Nathan Crooks in Miami at ncrooks@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sebastian Tong at stong41@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireball

SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireballA SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.


Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TV

Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TVIran considers dual nationals aboard a Ukrainian plane that was shot down accidentally this month to be Iranian citizens, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said on Monday. Iran does not recognize dual nationality. Many of the 176 people killed in the disaster were Iranians with dual citizenship.


A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the Midwest

A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the MidwestAuthorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.


2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-in

2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-inGov. Wanda Vázquez fired the heads of Puerto Rico’s housing and family departments Sunday in the latest fallout over the discovery of a warehouse filled with emergency supplies dating from Hurricane Maria. The removal of Housing Secretary Fernando Gil and Department of Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar came a day after the governor fired the director of Puerto Rico’s emergency management agency. Vázquez fired him hours after a Facebook video showed angry people breaking into the warehouse in an area where thousands have been in shelters since a recent earthquake.


Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekend

Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekendThe Senate impeachment trial is set to begin on Tuesday in Washington.


Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class Submarines

Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class SubmarinesThe class seems to have overcome its technical and financial problems, although the lingering impact of those issues could affect not only future classes of SSNs, but also the UK’s commitment to building a new class of SSBNs.


Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expires

Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expiresThousands of Iraqi anti-government protesters grappled with security forces in a bid to shut streets across the country on Monday, a deadline they had given authorities to implement long-awaited reforms. Rallies have rocked Iraq since October but fearing they would lose momentum amid spiralling regional tensions protesters last Monday told the government it had one week to meet their demands or they would escalate. Late Sunday young protesters began sealing off highways and bridges across the capital Baghdad and Iraq's south, torching tyres and setting up makeshift barricades.


China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virus

China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reported 17 new cases of the mysterious SARS-like virus on Sunday, including three people in serious condition, heightening fears ahead of China's Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of people move around the country. The new coronavirus strain has caused alarm because of its connection to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003. Of the 17 new cases in the central city of Wuhan -- believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak -- three were described as "severe", of which two patients were too critical to be moved, authorities said.


TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agent

TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agentTara Houska ‘humiliated’ by TSA agent who ‘snapped my braids like reins’ during screening at Minneapolis-St Paul airportThe federal Transportation Security Administration has apologized to a Native American woman who said an agent at Minneapolis-St Paul international airport “pulled her braids” and said “giddy up!” when she took a flight from there this week.“The agent said she needed to pat down my braids,” tweeted Tara Houska, an indigenous rights advocate and attorney. “She pulled them behind my shoulders, laughed and said ‘giddyup!’ as she snapped my braids like reins. My hair is part of my spirit. I am a Native woman. I am angry, humiliated. Your ‘fun’ hurt.”Houska, who is Ojibwe, added: “When I informed the middle-aged blonde woman who had casually used her authority to dehumanize and disrespect me, she said, ‘Well it was just in fun, I’m sorry. Your hair is lovely.’“That is NOT an apology and it is NOT OK.”According to the Washington Post, women of color have long experienced problems at TSA checkpoints, because natural, braided or twisted hair prompt “flags” on security devices, spurring “more invasive screenings”.Bring Me The News, a Minnesota website, appeared to have been first to report Houska’s experience.In a statement to the Guardian, the TSA said it had been “made aware of allegations made by a traveler about her screening experience at Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport [on] Monday morning.“TSA officials investigated the incident and on Tuesday afternoon, TSA’s federal security director for Minnesota, Cliff Van Leuven, spoke with the traveler. He apologized for actions and a comment that were insensitive and made by a TSA officer to the traveler during the screening experience.”Van Leuven also wrote to airport staff.“In the news last night and today,” he said, “you’ve likely seen – or heard – of a TSA officer at MSP who was insensitive in screening the long braided hair of a Native American passenger Monday morning. Did it actually happen? Yes. Exactly as described? Yes.“This morning, I reached out to the passenger via email. She called me back early this afternoon. I apologized for how she was treated during the screening of her braids – and we had a very pleasant conversation.“She reiterated that she doesn’t want the officer to get in trouble, but she is hoping we’ll take the chance to continue to educate our staff about the many Native American Tribes/Bands in our state and region to better understand their culture.”The airport apologized on Twitter.Houska could not immediately be reached for comment.


El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughter

El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughterThe mug shot of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, imprisoned leader of the ruthless Sinaloa Cartel, is not just for police blotters anymore.


Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'

Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will need to be protected at taxpayers’ expense against the threat of terror attacks and kidnap for years to come, security experts have said. Police and former security chiefs fear the couple will continue to be at risk from organised terror groups, political fanatics and lone obsessives long after they separate from the Royal family. Talks are understood to be taking place at senior levels over the best way of providing protection for Meghan and Prince Harry as they divide their time between Britain and their new life in North America. But there are fears among some experts that palace and government officials may be underestimating both the potential threat and what is required to protect the couple against it. Dai Davies, who was Head of Royal Protection from 1994 to 1998 and former Chief Superintendent (Divisional Commander) Metropolitan Police Service, said: “We have to learn the lessons of history and act on them. Anyone in charge of security has to think the impossible and then think it again and I fear there is not enough of that going on by the experts currently in charge. “One thing you can be sure of is that terrorists and others who pose a threat are thinking about it all the time.” Mr Davies said the three main threats come from jihadist terrorists targeting Prince Harry, who also served in Afghanistan; lone ‘fixateds’ and royal obsessives; and right wing extremists with an hatred of Meghan as a woman of colour marrying into the royal family. Minister and senior police officers are thought to be determined to avoid the mistakes made over Diana, Princess of Wales, who in 1993 turned down publicly funded police protection except when she was with her sons William and Harry or staying at Kensington Palace. That left her relying on private security at other times, leading to her being in the hands of the Ritz Hotel’s head of security Herni Paul on the night she died when their car crashed in the Pont de l'Alma underpass as he tried to evade photographers following Diana. Her bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones was badly injured in the crash, on 31 August 1997. Ken Wharfe, who served as Diana's royal protection officer for six years, resigned from the position in 1993, has since said that if he and his team were working with the Princess in 1997, they may have been able to prevent her death.  Mr Davies, who said there have been far more plots against the Royals than publicly acknowledged, added: “We don't want the situation where Harry and Meghan are being followed, without protection, by paparazzi or people with a fixation and we need to be sure that protection is of the highest level.” But he added that the high cost of providing security may cause resentment among British taxpayers if the Sussexes begin to earn large sums of private income outside of any Royal duties they continue to carry out. “The question is whether the British public will wear the cost of security, even if it is miniscule in real terms, over a long period,” said Mr Davies, who was in charge of protection for the Queen and the Royal family throughout the UK and worldwide. Lord West of Spithead, who was a security minister from 2007 to 2010, said that Harry and Meghan would be expected to make a contribution towards the cost of their security should they start earning a large amount of private income. But he said there was no question that high levels of police protection would have to be provided by the British government into the future. “We have got an obligation to provide security for one of the Queen’s sons and his family and that’s a long term obligation,” he said. “It would be nice to work out an arrangement with the Canadians, but we can’t not provide that protection ourselves, regardless. Mike Penning MP, who was police minister from 2014 to 2016 and went on to serve as justice and Armed Forces minister, said: “It doesn’t matter who they are, if they are at risk we have a duty to protect them, it’s as simple as that. That requirement should be based on any risk assessment made by our intelligence services and by the Canadians.”


The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the world

The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the worldThere's something powerful about finally seeing a famous landmark or natural wonder in person instead of on a postcard (or on Instagram).


Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in Panama

Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in PanamaA religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.


US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwise

US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwiseThe U.S. ambassador to South Korea has some unusual explanations for the harsh criticism he's faced in his host country. Or a Japanese ancestry that raises unpleasant reminders of Japan's former colonial domination of Korea? Many South Koreans, however, have a more straight-forward explanation for Harry Harris' struggle to win hearts and minds in Seoul, and it's got more to do with an outspoken manner that they see as undiplomatic and rude.


Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial

Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial(Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violent

Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violentA prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activist was arrested by police, his organization said on Monday, after a protest he helped organize in the financial district a day earlier turned violent with officers firing tear gas to disperse the crowds. Ventus Lau was arrested on Sunday evening on charges of "obstruction of police administration" and violating terms set when permission was granted for the protest, the Hong Kong Civil Assembly Team said in a statement. "It was primarily rioters' violent acts which led to the suspension of the gathering," Senior Superintendent Ng Lok-chun told reporters.


Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at Sobibor

Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at SobiborNew photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there. Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011. According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give "detailed insight" into the camp in German-occupied Poland.


Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants

Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants“This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”


Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang region

Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang regionA strong earthquake damaged buildings and injured at least one person seriously in China's far west Xinjiang region, the government said Monday. Rescue teams were sent to Peyzawat county, an area east of the city of Kashgar, after the Sunday night quake. State broadcaster CCTV showed a cluster of small collapsed brick buildings and partially fallen walls that fronted properties along the street.


Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assets

Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assetsAfrica’s richest woman has been accused of corruption and exploiting her own country’s natural resources, after thousands of documents detailing her business interests were leaked to the media. Isabel dos Santos, who resides in the UK and whose father was the president of Angola, faces allegations of exploiting family connections to secure deals on land, oil and diamonds. According to the documents, seen by BBC Panorama and the Guardian, she and her husband were allowed to buy up valuable state assets and siphon hundreds of millions of dollars out of Angola. Ms dos Santos, whose fortune is estimated at £2bn, says these claims are entirely false and that she is the victim of a witch-hunt led by the Angolan government. She also wrote on Twitter that the leaked documents were “fake” and based on “false information.”     Ms dos Santos is already under investigation for corruption by the Angolan government, which has frozen her assets in the country. The documents were obtained by the Platform to Protect Whistle-blowers in Africa and then passed to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Anti-corruption campaigners responded by claiming that Ms dos Santos has been exploiting her own country for personal gain, with normal Angolan citizens the victims of her lavish lifestyle. "Every time she appears on the cover of some glossy magazine somewhere in the world, every time that she hosts one of her glamorous parties in the south of France, she is doing so by trampling on the aspirations of the citizens of Angola,” Andrew Feinstein, the head of Corruption Watch, told the BBC. In an interview with the BBC following the leak, Ms dos Santos said: “I regret that Angola has chosen this path, I think that we all stand a lot to lose. “Now, when you look at my track record and you see the work I have done and look at all the companies I have built, most certainly my companies are commercial companies.   “If you tell me, is there anything wrong for an Angolan person to have a business venture with a state company, I think there is nothing wrong.” She added that she was facing “prejudice” due to being the daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, who served as President of Angola from 1979 to 2017. Ms dos Santos was educated in the UK and is married to Sindika Dokolo, a Congolese art collector and businessman.


A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million years

A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million yearsA photo of a piece of petrified wood has been shared across the Internet, but no one knows who took it or why it's such a rock star.


A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto Rico

A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto RicoKaylen Ward says she raised $1 million for Australia, sending nudes to people who donated. Now she is doing the same, raising money for Puerto Rico.


S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from China

S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from ChinaSouth Korea on Monday confirmed its first case of the SARS-like virus that is spreading in China, as concerns mount about a wider outbreak. A 35-year-old Chinese woman who flew in from Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was confirmed to have the new coronavirus strain, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said. "She was visiting Seoul on a tour for the Lunar New Year holidays," said KCDC director Jung Eun-kyeong, adding Korean authorities were investigating her movement on the plane and those who might have come in contact with her, including flight attendants.


Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian Americans

Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian AmericansAs penalties create hardship for Iran’s residents, Iranians in US also suffer consequences: ‘The sanctions are still chasing me’Following the US assassination of a top Iranian general earlier this month and Iranian airstrikes against US military bases in Iraq, Donald Trump once again imposed biting sanctions against the regime in Tehran. To Iranian Americans, many of whom have lived under sanctions in Iran or have family members there suffering through economic hardship, the fresh round of penalties is a painful reminder of the collateral consequences of escalating conflict.Iranian Americans across the United States told the Guardian about their worries for their family members and friends affected by US sanctions. And they spoke of the ways the policies affect their own lives, work and communities in the US. “I was raised under sanctions my entire life,” said Nazanin Asadi, 34, who left Iran for California in 2014 and now works as a law clerk in Orange county. “After moving to the US permanently, I can’t believe the sanctions and these laws are still chasing me … I don’t want my community to suffer.”The threats of a full-blown war following Trump’s 3 January order to kill Gen Qassem Suleimani caused anxiety among some Persian communities in the US, especially for Iranian families who have been torn apart by Trump’s travel ban. Trump backed away from additional strikes, but his administration implemented a fresh wave of sanctions, targeting senior Iranian officials and the country’s textile, construction, manufacturing and other sectors.The US has imposed sanctions for decades, targeting Iran’s energy sector and a range of exports of goods and services. Trump had already expanded sanctions against Iran in 2018 with his withdrawal from the nuclear deal signed under Barack Obama.Under sanctions law, people are forced to apply for specific licenses when they seek to be exempted from prohibited transactions, and even for allowed activities, there are complicated reporting requirements. In practice that means hundreds of thousands of Iranian Americans with family and financial ties to Iran can face a complex set of burdens and hurdles in their lives, jobs and education.“These sanctions are supposed to be targeting the government of Iran and certain individuals, but end up targeting the average person and your own citizens,” said Mehrnoush Yazdanyar, a California attorney who helps Iranian Americans navigate sanctions. “You’re sanctioning your own legal permanent residents, and in doing so, you’re alienating them.” ‘It is a daily stress’Yazdanyar’s law offices in southern California, a region home to the largest Iranian population outside of Iran, have assisted thousands of clients in sanctions-related matters over the years. Families often can’t send money back and forth, creating significant hurdles for Iranian Americans who want to support their parents or families in Iran who want to help their loved ones pursue their education or other dreams in America.While the regulations are supposed to allow some financial transactions through third parties, many attempting to navigate the process can end up in legal trouble or with closed or frozen bank accounts, she said.Asadi, who grew up in Iran, was accepted to the University of Southern California law school and moved here with dreams of becoming a judge. But with the sanctions blocking her parents from offering her financial support, she had to pay her own way through her education, working multiple jobs while studying.“I couldn’t afford my life, I couldn’t pay my expenses,” she said. “It was too much pressure emotionally and financially.”She scraped by and managed to graduate, and she now works with Yazdanyar helping people dealing with sanctions. But when Asadi wants to help her own parents in Iran, who are disabled, she has no way to offer them funds, pay for their medications or even buy them gifts: “We cannot support each other.”That feeling of guilt is even worse when there’s a threat of war, Asadi added: “I’m paying taxes to the government who purchases military equipment to bomb my parents in Iran … If war happens, what should I do?”Pirouz Kavehpour, a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), engineering professor, who is also Iranian American, said he had repeatedly seen his Iranian students lose access to their bank accounts due to sanctions, derailing their research and education.“It’s a daily stress … We’re international. We’re already on thin ice. If you don’t perform well, you will be sent back,” he said. “You’re a kid here and you need to live off fast food … and then you’re told by a random guy in a bank field office: ‘Don’t even think about getting the money.’”With a large wave of Iranian Americans arriving in the US after the 1979 revolution, some are also now inheriting family businesses or properties back in Iran from relatives who have died, but it is often a nightmare process to attempt and recoup the assets, said Erich Ferrari, a Washington DC-based attorney who handles sanctions cases.Even those who try to do everything right, reporting the transactions and getting proper licenses, can end up facing investigations by the US government, he said. Law enforcement monitors money transfers, and in some cases Iranian Americans have found the FBI at their doors asking questions: “There’s always a threat looming.”Ferrari said he had seen family relationships fall apart in the process, adding: “They are trying to do something that is beneficial to the US, and divest themselves from Iran and bring their money here.” Research and charity work thwarted: ‘How does the US benefit?’In addition to the recent wave of Iranian students who have been denied visas at the last minute, under sanctions law, faculty members are also barred from traveling to Iran for research or other work without approval from the US treasury department.“I’ve been invited many times to give a talk in Iran … but we are not allowed,” said Kavehpour, the UCLA professor. He noted that Iran could benefit from working with UCLA experts on autism research, but that it would be impossible to set up any collaboration.Aysan Rangchian, a 28-year-old Iranian PhD student at UCLA, said Iranian students often don’t even apply for conferences anywhere outside of the US for fear of consequences. Iranian students can also struggle to get grants and funding: “This is making the US less appealing for international students.”Last year, Iranian researchers faced criminal prosecution when they attempted to do stem-cell research in the US. As a result of that process, potentially groundbreaking science will not go forward here, said Yazdanyar: “How did the United States benefit from this?”Yazdanyar has also represented a not-for-profit organization that helps orphaned children across the world, including in Iran. Even when the group received a specific license to send aid to Iran, financial institutions in third countries have declined to assist with the transfer due to concerns about sanctions. That means humanitarian aid has been delayed and blocked, she said.During floods in Iran last year, it was painful that the sanctions blocked Iranian Americans from being able to offer basic donations, said Assal Rad, a research fellow with the National Iranian American Council, who lives in Orange county. She said that while the impact of sanctions on Iranian Americans paled in comparison with what Iranian citizens suffer, the rules added to this “constant feeling that your identity is under attack”.“Whether sanctions, the travel ban, or your loyalty being questioned … it’s really isolating,” she said, adding of sanctions: “It’s an ineffective policy that is also harming Americans themselves.”


Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycott

Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycottMalaysia will not take retaliatory trade action against India over its boycott of palm oil purchases amid a political row between the two countries, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said on Monday. "We are too small to take retaliatory action," Mahathir told reporters in Langkawi, a resort island off the western coast of Malaysia.


Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'

Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'President Trump has given a new justification for killing Qassem Soleimani, telling a gathering of Republican donors that the Iranian general was “saying bad things about our country.”


Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be Different

Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be DifferentThis second cold war, conducted on a teeming planet whose anxiety is intensified by the passions and rages of social media, is only in its beginning stages. The aim, like in the first Cold War, is negative victory: not defeating the Chinese, but waiting them out, just as we waited the Soviets out.


Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort Bragg

Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort BraggThe remains of a paratrooper who was killed a week ago in Afghanistan have been returned to his family in the U.S. The family of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin greeted his flag-draped casket at Pope Army Airfield at Fort Bragg on Saturday, The Fayetteville Observer reported. The 29-year-old from Newport News, Virginia, was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.


Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bid

Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bidStriving to extend its influence in the eastern Mediterranean where tensions revolve around energy resources, Turkey sees Cyprus as the weakest link in a regional alliance buffering Ankara's ambitions, analysts told AFP. The bid comes as Turkey flexes its muscle across the Mediterranean from Libya to Syria, where Ankara has taken on diplomatic and military roles. Although Turkish military action is not expected against Cyprus, analysts warn Ankara will increase pressure on Nicosia to deter it from completing its energy exploration plans.


Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the week

Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the weekAn area of high pressure building into the Northwest through Monday will briefly offer tranquil conditions before a storm system descends on the region by midweek.Quiet conditions over the Northwest have directed the storm track farther north into Pacific Canada, resulting in heavy rain and mountain snow in western British Columbia since last week.However, the next Pacific storm will take aim farther south, bringing wet weather back to the Northwest Monday night through Tuesday."Snow levels will be higher than with previous storms, so precipitation along the I-5 corridor from Seattle to Northern California will fall in the form of rain," AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Elliott said.Even though precipitation will fall as a plain rain, motorists may experience a slower Tuesday morning commute along the I-5 corridor. Along the coast, a building westerly swell will create the threat for sneaker waves along area beaches.Beachgoers are advised to stay away from the shoreline to avoid falling victim to these large waves.The threat for wet weather will extend eastward beyond the coastal lowlands and Cascades from the storm.Kennewick and Spokane, Washington, and even Boise, Idaho, can expect wet weather to develop during the day on Tuesday.This storm system is not expected to have snow levels as low as some of the recent systems. However, with levels initially around 3,000 feet, area passes such as Snoqualmie and Stevens could still face some travel issues from Tuesday into Wednesday.The persistent pattern of unsettled weather across the Cascades and northern Sierras will continue to keep an elevated avalanche threat in place this week.As the storm system tracks into the Intermountain West by Wednesday, dry and settled conditions will come to an end.Wintry weather is likely for places like Salt Lake City, Utah, and Yellowstone National Park. While major accumulations are not expected, it will prove beneficial for area ski resorts.AccuWeather meteorologists predict the unsettled pattern will likely continue into late week across the Northwest.A lack of Arctic intrusions will also continue to keep snow levels higher than average for this time of year.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair loss

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair lossPressley, who's been famous for her Senegalese twists, said she first started noticing patches of her hair falling out last fall. She's now bald.


Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a memento

Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a mementoA Montana man told authorities that he cut off a grizzly bear's claws as a memento after shooting it in self-defense because he was mad that the bear was going to eat him, according to court records. Bryan Berg, 35, appeared in court on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Missoula after pleading guilty to illegal transport of grizzly bear claws, a misdemeanor, according to the Flathead Beacon. Grizzly bears in northwestern Montana are classified as a threatened species.


‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidate

‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidateWe don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil Democrats are trying to choose a candidate to beat Donald Trump, the most corrupt president in history. Some think nominating Joe Biden, a moderate white man who calls himself “Middle Class” Joe, makes sense.But Biden has a big corruption problem and it makes him a weak candidate. I know it seems crazy, but a lot of the voters we need – independents and people who might stay home – will look at Biden and Trump and say: “They’re all dirty.”It looks like “Middle Class” Joe has perfected the art of taking big contributions, then representing his corporate donors at the cost of middle- and working-class Americans. Converting campaign contributions into legislative favors and policy positions isn’t being “moderate”. It is the kind of transactional politics Americans have come to loathe.There are three clear examples.First, Biden’s support for finance over working-class Americans. His career was bankrolled by the credit card industry. He delivered for it by spearheading a bankruptcy bill that made it harder for Americans to reduce their debts and helped cause the financial crisis. He not only authored and voted for that bill, he split with Barack Obama and led the battle to vote down Democratic amendments.His explanations for carrying water for the credit card industry have changed over time. They have never rung true.> Nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat TrumpThe simplest explanation is the most likely: he did it for his donors. At a fundraiser last year, Biden promised his Wall Street donors that “nothing would fundamentally change” for them if he became president. Now the financial world is raising huge money for his campaign. It clearly thinks he’s going to be its friend if elected. Most Americans, who get ripped off by the financial sector on a daily basis, aren’t looking for a candidate who has made their life harder.Second, healthcare. On 25 April, the day he announced his campaign, Biden went straight to a fundraiser co-hosted by the chief executive of a major health insurance corporation. He refuses to sign a pledge to reject money from insurance and pharma execs and continues to raise money from healthcare industry donors. His campaign is being bankrolled by a super Pac run by healthcare lobbyists.What did all these donors get? A healthcare proposal that preserves the power of the insurance industry and leaves 10 million Americans uninsured.Third, climate change. Biden signed a pledge not to take money from the fossil fuel industry, then broke his promise. Right after a CNN town hall on climate change, he held a fundraiser hosted by the founder of a fossil fuel conglomerate. He is pushing climate policy that has gotten dismal reviews from several leading environmental groups.There are plenty of other examples that raise questions, like housing and social security. Big real estate moguls are playing a major role in Biden’s campaign. Unlike his rivals, he has no comprehensive housing plan. When he pushed for cuts to Social Security, was he serving donors or his constituents?I can already hear the howls: But look at Trump! Trump is 1,000 times worse!You don’t need to convince me. I have spent my life writing about and fighting against corruption, and in America I have never seen anything like the current administration. In the last three years, I have made combatting Trump’s corruption the heart of my work.I was on the first lawsuit against him for corrupt constitutional violations and I ran for attorney general in New York on a platform of pointing out just how dangerous he is, and how important unused state laws are to stopping him. My work on corruption was cited in the House judiciary committee’s report on impeachment.> 2020 should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and crueltyBut here’s the thing: nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat Trump. It will allow Trump to muddy the water, to once again pretend he is the one “draining the swamp”, running against Washington culture. Trump and the Cambridge Analytica of 2020 will campaign, as they did in 2016, on a message of radical nihilism: everybody lies, everybody is corrupt, nothing matters, there is no truth.Corrupt politicians always use whataboutism. With Biden, we are basically handing Trump a whataboutism playbook. The comparison won’t be fair, but if you think he won’t use Biden’s closeness to donors as a cudgel to try to keep people home, you haven’t been paying attention. Unlike Democrats, who must give voters a reason to come out, Trump doesn’t need voters to love him. He just needs to convince people the whole game is ugly.Whether or not Biden is making choices to please donors, there is no doubt his record represents the transactional, grossly corrupt culture in Washington that long precedes Trump. We cannot allow Trump to so lower our standards that we aren’t even allowed to call out that culture, which has not only stymied progress but also harmed the Democratic party.The good news is that we still have time to break with this culture of corruption. We don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil. The 2020 election should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and cruelty.We have a rare opportunity to end a larger culture of corruption and we should take it – we will regret it if we don’t. * Zephyr Teachout, an associate professor at Fordham Law School, is the author of Corruption in America: From Ben Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United. Her next book is Break ’Em Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money. She has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president.


Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte dies

Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte diesLotte Group founder Shin Kyuk-ho, who started manufacturing chewing gum in 1948 in Japan and built the business into South Korea's No.5 conglomerate with interests ranging from retail to chemicals, died on Sunday, the company said. Lotte was founded in 1948 as a chewing gum maker in Japan by Shin, who moved to the neighbouring country when the Korean peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule.


Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trial

Republicans ramp up calls for Hunter Biden to testify in impeachment trialCruz has argued that if witnesses will be allowed in the upcoming Senate impeachment trial, a rule of reciprocity should be implemented.


ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'

ICE ups ante in standoff with NYC: 'This is not a request'Federal authorities are turning to a new tactic in the escalating conflict over New York City's so-called sanctuary policies, issuing four “immigration subpoenas” to the city for information about inmates wanted for deportation. “This is not a request — it's a demand,” Henry Lucero, a senior U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official, told The Associated Press. Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration said Saturday the city would review the subpoenas.


Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt Floor

Two More Bodies Found at Tijuana Property Where Missing California Couple Were Buried Under the Dirt FloorTwo more bodies have been discovered at a Tijuana, Mexico, property where investigators earlier found the remains of a missing California couple buried under the dirt floor of a house on Friday. Jesús Rubén López Guillén, 70, a U.S. resident, and his wife Maria Teresa Guillén, 65, a naturalized U.S. citizen, were reported missing by their daughter Norma López after they traveled from Garden Grove to Tijuana on Jan. 10 to collect more than $6,400 in overdue rent from their 37-year-old son-in-law. Police in Garden Grove launched a missing persons investigation after López said she could no longer track her parents’ movements through the Find My Phone app. She said the last signal she received before their phone went dead was at the property they owned where her husband was living in southern Tijuana, about 4 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. Their bodies were found buried under the dirt floor of one of the property’s three homes late Friday.While conducting an investigation into the circumstances of the Guilléns’ murder, Mexican investigators say they discovered the bodies of another couple buried in the property. It is not known if they were found in the same house as the Guilléns’ remains. The new victims have not yet been identified, but police in Mexico say they also may have been involved in a monetary dispute with the son-in-law.The son-in-law, a Mexican national who was deported from the U.S. in 2012 and identified only as “Santiago” in court documents, was first charged with the California couple’s disappearance and taken into custody while the property was searched. Baja California state prosecutor Hirán Sánchez confirmed that when his in-law’s bodies were found, he was charged with their murder.Sanchez told reporters that when the son-in-law was first questioned about what happened to his in-laws, he offered up a “series of contradictions” including a tale that they had walked across the border and that he had picked them up. López says her parents had instead driven their own pickup truck to retrieve the money. The son-in-law also told police that he first took them to their property and then they went together to a bank to exchange currency he paid them, after which he said he drove them back to the border. Instead investigators say that the son-in-law tried to extract money with the couple’s bank cards.“The Guilléns drove themselves to their houses, not Santiago,” Sanchez said at a news conference. “They never left.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ river

Body of woman who was missing for almost 6 years found in car submerged in NJ riverVanessa Smallwood of Maple Shade, N.J., was 46 at the time of her disappearance. She was identified in a statement from New Jersey State Police.


Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigation

Trump's Russia adviser 'escorted from White House' amid investigationPresident Trump's latest Russia expert has reportedly been escorted from the White House amid claims of a security-related investigation.


California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over School

California Elementary Teachers Sue Delta After Plane Dumps Jet Fuel Over SchoolThe teachers felt “sick, dizzy and nauseated” after being covered with the fuel


Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this long

Bless Virginia for passing the Equal Rights Amendment, but blame women for taking this longWomen could've fought for the ERA long before now, but too many chose political ideology over enshrining protections in the U.S. Constitution.


The 25 Best PSP Games

The 25 Best PSP Games


Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shut

Philippine volcano recharging, scientist says, as shops, hotels told to keep shutA restive volcano in the Philippines has a high risk of eruption as it is "recharging" with fresh magma and rising emissions of toxic gas, a top scientist said on Monday, while authorities ordered commercial establishments to stay shut. Earthquakes were still happening at the Taal volcano, which shot giant clouds of ash miles into the air on Jan. 12, and levels of the gas were rising, a sign of magma "recharging" and "resupplying" beneath it, a Philippine vulcanologist said. "If it reaches the crater, it could cause a strong explosion," Renato Solidum, director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), told DZMM radio.


Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on board

Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on boardWorkers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.


Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across border

Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across borderAdolfo Cardenas smiles faintly at the memory of traveling with his 14-year-old son from Honduras to the U.S.-Mexico border in only nine days, riding buses and paying a smuggler $6,000 to ensure passage through highway checkpoints. Father and son walked about 10 minutes in Arizona's stifling June heat before surrendering to border agents. Instead of being released with paperwork to appear in immigration court in Dallas, where Cardenas hopes to live with a cousin, they were bused more than an hour to wait in the Mexican border city of Mexicali.


Battle over impeachment witnesses escalates

Battle over impeachment witnesses escalatesKey players in President Donald Trump’s impending trial amplified their arguments on the Sunday news shows.


China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?

China Thinks It Can Nuke American Cities. Should We Worry?World War III is no joke...


Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sources

Yemen missile attack kills at least 70 soldiers: sourcesAt least 70 Yemeni soldiers have been killed in a missile attack launched by Huthi rebels on a mosque in the central province of Marib, medical and military sources said Sunday. The Huthis attacked a mosque in a military camp in Marib -- about 170 kilometres (105 miles) east of Sanaa -- during evening prayers on Saturday, military sources told AFP.


'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-Ed

'I Dare You to Mock Me.' Capt. 'Sully' Sullenberger Defends Joe Biden Against Attacks on His Speech in New York Times Op-EdChesley “Sully” Sullenberger opened up about his past struggles with stuttering in defending Biden and his speech.


Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek

Report Warned of Threat to U.S. Troops in Germany: Newsweek(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. received intelligence about a potentially imminent attack being planned against military personnel stationed in Germany, Newsweek reported, citing a memo it saw.The 66th Military Intelligence Brigade received third party information stating that a possible attack could occur against soldiers at either Tower Barracks in Grafenwohr or Tower Barracks, Dulmen; the exact location, date and time of possible attack was unknown Information was marked unclassified and from a senior U.S. intelligence official “The source of information stated the attack would be carried out by an unknown Jordanian extremist currently located in Germany near an unknown military base,” the report saidU.S. Army Europe confirmed to Newsweek that a potential threat was identified and investigated last night “German and US officials were consulted and no imminent threat was found to exit”To view the source of this information click hereTo contact the reporter on this story: Nathan Crooks in Miami at ncrooks@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sebastian Tong at stong41@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireball

SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireballA SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.


Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TV

Iran considers dual nationals on downed Ukrainian plane to be Iranians: TVIran considers dual nationals aboard a Ukrainian plane that was shot down accidentally this month to be Iranian citizens, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said on Monday. Iran does not recognize dual nationality. Many of the 176 people killed in the disaster were Iranians with dual citizenship.


A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the Midwest

A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the MidwestAuthorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.


2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-in

2 more Puerto Rico officials fired after warehouse break-inGov. Wanda Vázquez fired the heads of Puerto Rico’s housing and family departments Sunday in the latest fallout over the discovery of a warehouse filled with emergency supplies dating from Hurricane Maria. The removal of Housing Secretary Fernando Gil and Department of Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar came a day after the governor fired the director of Puerto Rico’s emergency management agency. Vázquez fired him hours after a Facebook video showed angry people breaking into the warehouse in an area where thousands have been in shelters since a recent earthquake.


Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekend

Trump leaves for Mar-a-Lago for the weekendThe Senate impeachment trial is set to begin on Tuesday in Washington.


Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class Submarines

Russia Is Worried About Britain's Astute-Class SubmarinesThe class seems to have overcome its technical and financial problems, although the lingering impact of those issues could affect not only future classes of SSNs, but also the UK’s commitment to building a new class of SSBNs.


Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expires

Iraqi protesters ramp up pressure as deadline expiresThousands of Iraqi anti-government protesters grappled with security forces in a bid to shut streets across the country on Monday, a deadline they had given authorities to implement long-awaited reforms. Rallies have rocked Iraq since October but fearing they would lose momentum amid spiralling regional tensions protesters last Monday told the government it had one week to meet their demands or they would escalate. Late Sunday young protesters began sealing off highways and bridges across the capital Baghdad and Iraq's south, torching tyres and setting up makeshift barricades.


China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virus

China reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reports 17 new cases of mystery virusChina reported 17 new cases of the mysterious SARS-like virus on Sunday, including three people in serious condition, heightening fears ahead of China's Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of people move around the country. The new coronavirus strain has caused alarm because of its connection to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003. Of the 17 new cases in the central city of Wuhan -- believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak -- three were described as "severe", of which two patients were too critical to be moved, authorities said.


TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agent

TSA issues apology to Native American woman who had braids pulled by agentTara Houska ‘humiliated’ by TSA agent who ‘snapped my braids like reins’ during screening at Minneapolis-St Paul airportThe federal Transportation Security Administration has apologized to a Native American woman who said an agent at Minneapolis-St Paul international airport “pulled her braids” and said “giddy up!” when she took a flight from there this week.“The agent said she needed to pat down my braids,” tweeted Tara Houska, an indigenous rights advocate and attorney. “She pulled them behind my shoulders, laughed and said ‘giddyup!’ as she snapped my braids like reins. My hair is part of my spirit. I am a Native woman. I am angry, humiliated. Your ‘fun’ hurt.”Houska, who is Ojibwe, added: “When I informed the middle-aged blonde woman who had casually used her authority to dehumanize and disrespect me, she said, ‘Well it was just in fun, I’m sorry. Your hair is lovely.’“That is NOT an apology and it is NOT OK.”According to the Washington Post, women of color have long experienced problems at TSA checkpoints, because natural, braided or twisted hair prompt “flags” on security devices, spurring “more invasive screenings”.Bring Me The News, a Minnesota website, appeared to have been first to report Houska’s experience.In a statement to the Guardian, the TSA said it had been “made aware of allegations made by a traveler about her screening experience at Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport [on] Monday morning.“TSA officials investigated the incident and on Tuesday afternoon, TSA’s federal security director for Minnesota, Cliff Van Leuven, spoke with the traveler. He apologized for actions and a comment that were insensitive and made by a TSA officer to the traveler during the screening experience.”Van Leuven also wrote to airport staff.“In the news last night and today,” he said, “you’ve likely seen – or heard – of a TSA officer at MSP who was insensitive in screening the long braided hair of a Native American passenger Monday morning. Did it actually happen? Yes. Exactly as described? Yes.“This morning, I reached out to the passenger via email. She called me back early this afternoon. I apologized for how she was treated during the screening of her braids – and we had a very pleasant conversation.“She reiterated that she doesn’t want the officer to get in trouble, but she is hoping we’ll take the chance to continue to educate our staff about the many Native American Tribes/Bands in our state and region to better understand their culture.”The airport apologized on Twitter.Houska could not immediately be reached for comment.


El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughter

El Chapo 701 craft lager coming soon thanks to drug lord's daughterThe mug shot of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, imprisoned leader of the ruthless Sinaloa Cartel, is not just for police blotters anymore.


Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'

Meghan and Harry will need taxpayer funded security 'for years to come'The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will need to be protected at taxpayers’ expense against the threat of terror attacks and kidnap for years to come, security experts have said. Police and former security chiefs fear the couple will continue to be at risk from organised terror groups, political fanatics and lone obsessives long after they separate from the Royal family. Talks are understood to be taking place at senior levels over the best way of providing protection for Meghan and Prince Harry as they divide their time between Britain and their new life in North America. But there are fears among some experts that palace and government officials may be underestimating both the potential threat and what is required to protect the couple against it. Dai Davies, who was Head of Royal Protection from 1994 to 1998 and former Chief Superintendent (Divisional Commander) Metropolitan Police Service, said: “We have to learn the lessons of history and act on them. Anyone in charge of security has to think the impossible and then think it again and I fear there is not enough of that going on by the experts currently in charge. “One thing you can be sure of is that terrorists and others who pose a threat are thinking about it all the time.” Mr Davies said the three main threats come from jihadist terrorists targeting Prince Harry, who also served in Afghanistan; lone ‘fixateds’ and royal obsessives; and right wing extremists with an hatred of Meghan as a woman of colour marrying into the royal family. Minister and senior police officers are thought to be determined to avoid the mistakes made over Diana, Princess of Wales, who in 1993 turned down publicly funded police protection except when she was with her sons William and Harry or staying at Kensington Palace. That left her relying on private security at other times, leading to her being in the hands of the Ritz Hotel’s head of security Herni Paul on the night she died when their car crashed in the Pont de l'Alma underpass as he tried to evade photographers following Diana. Her bodyguard, Trevor Rees-Jones was badly injured in the crash, on 31 August 1997. Ken Wharfe, who served as Diana's royal protection officer for six years, resigned from the position in 1993, has since said that if he and his team were working with the Princess in 1997, they may have been able to prevent her death.  Mr Davies, who said there have been far more plots against the Royals than publicly acknowledged, added: “We don't want the situation where Harry and Meghan are being followed, without protection, by paparazzi or people with a fixation and we need to be sure that protection is of the highest level.” But he added that the high cost of providing security may cause resentment among British taxpayers if the Sussexes begin to earn large sums of private income outside of any Royal duties they continue to carry out. “The question is whether the British public will wear the cost of security, even if it is miniscule in real terms, over a long period,” said Mr Davies, who was in charge of protection for the Queen and the Royal family throughout the UK and worldwide. Lord West of Spithead, who was a security minister from 2007 to 2010, said that Harry and Meghan would be expected to make a contribution towards the cost of their security should they start earning a large amount of private income. But he said there was no question that high levels of police protection would have to be provided by the British government into the future. “We have got an obligation to provide security for one of the Queen’s sons and his family and that’s a long term obligation,” he said. “It would be nice to work out an arrangement with the Canadians, but we can’t not provide that protection ourselves, regardless. Mike Penning MP, who was police minister from 2014 to 2016 and went on to serve as justice and Armed Forces minister, said: “It doesn’t matter who they are, if they are at risk we have a duty to protect them, it’s as simple as that. That requirement should be based on any risk assessment made by our intelligence services and by the Canadians.”


The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the world

The most iconic tourist attraction in 26 countries around the worldThere's something powerful about finally seeing a famous landmark or natural wonder in person instead of on a postcard (or on Instagram).


Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in Panama

Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in PanamaA religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.


US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwise

US envoy say it's his mustache; South Koreans say otherwiseThe U.S. ambassador to South Korea has some unusual explanations for the harsh criticism he's faced in his host country. Or a Japanese ancestry that raises unpleasant reminders of Japan's former colonial domination of Korea? Many South Koreans, however, have a more straight-forward explanation for Harry Harris' struggle to win hearts and minds in Seoul, and it's got more to do with an outspoken manner that they see as undiplomatic and rude.


Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial

Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial(Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violent

Police arrest organizer of Hong Kong protest after rally turns violentA prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activist was arrested by police, his organization said on Monday, after a protest he helped organize in the financial district a day earlier turned violent with officers firing tear gas to disperse the crowds. Ventus Lau was arrested on Sunday evening on charges of "obstruction of police administration" and violating terms set when permission was granted for the protest, the Hong Kong Civil Assembly Team said in a statement. "It was primarily rioters' violent acts which led to the suspension of the gathering," Senior Superintendent Ng Lok-chun told reporters.


Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at Sobibor

Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at SobiborNew photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there. Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011. According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give "detailed insight" into the camp in German-occupied Poland.


Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants

Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants“This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”


Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang region

Quake causes damage, injuries in China's Xinjiang regionA strong earthquake damaged buildings and injured at least one person seriously in China's far west Xinjiang region, the government said Monday. Rescue teams were sent to Peyzawat county, an area east of the city of Kashgar, after the Sunday night quake. State broadcaster CCTV showed a cluster of small collapsed brick buildings and partially fallen walls that fronted properties along the street.


Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assets

Africa's richest woman accused of corruption and siphoning off state assetsAfrica’s richest woman has been accused of corruption and exploiting her own country’s natural resources, after thousands of documents detailing her business interests were leaked to the media. Isabel dos Santos, who resides in the UK and whose father was the president of Angola, faces allegations of exploiting family connections to secure deals on land, oil and diamonds. According to the documents, seen by BBC Panorama and the Guardian, she and her husband were allowed to buy up valuable state assets and siphon hundreds of millions of dollars out of Angola. Ms dos Santos, whose fortune is estimated at £2bn, says these claims are entirely false and that she is the victim of a witch-hunt led by the Angolan government. She also wrote on Twitter that the leaked documents were “fake” and based on “false information.”     Ms dos Santos is already under investigation for corruption by the Angolan government, which has frozen her assets in the country. The documents were obtained by the Platform to Protect Whistle-blowers in Africa and then passed to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Anti-corruption campaigners responded by claiming that Ms dos Santos has been exploiting her own country for personal gain, with normal Angolan citizens the victims of her lavish lifestyle. "Every time she appears on the cover of some glossy magazine somewhere in the world, every time that she hosts one of her glamorous parties in the south of France, she is doing so by trampling on the aspirations of the citizens of Angola,” Andrew Feinstein, the head of Corruption Watch, told the BBC. In an interview with the BBC following the leak, Ms dos Santos said: “I regret that Angola has chosen this path, I think that we all stand a lot to lose. “Now, when you look at my track record and you see the work I have done and look at all the companies I have built, most certainly my companies are commercial companies.   “If you tell me, is there anything wrong for an Angolan person to have a business venture with a state company, I think there is nothing wrong.” She added that she was facing “prejudice” due to being the daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, who served as President of Angola from 1979 to 2017. Ms dos Santos was educated in the UK and is married to Sindika Dokolo, a Congolese art collector and businessman.


A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million years

A photo of petrified wood in Arizona went viral and it only took 225 million yearsA photo of a piece of petrified wood has been shared across the Internet, but no one knows who took it or why it's such a rock star.


A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto Rico

A 'naked philanthropist' who says she raised $1 million for Australia's fires is now sending nudes to people who donate to Puerto RicoKaylen Ward says she raised $1 million for Australia, sending nudes to people who donated. Now she is doing the same, raising money for Puerto Rico.


S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from China

S. Korea confirms first case of SARS-like virus from ChinaSouth Korea on Monday confirmed its first case of the SARS-like virus that is spreading in China, as concerns mount about a wider outbreak. A 35-year-old Chinese woman who flew in from Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was confirmed to have the new coronavirus strain, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said. "She was visiting Seoul on a tour for the Lunar New Year holidays," said KCDC director Jung Eun-kyeong, adding Korean authorities were investigating her movement on the plane and those who might have come in contact with her, including flight attendants.


Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian Americans

Cut off from family, unable to travel: how US sanctions punish Iranian AmericansAs penalties create hardship for Iran’s residents, Iranians in US also suffer consequences: ‘The sanctions are still chasing me’Following the US assassination of a top Iranian general earlier this month and Iranian airstrikes against US military bases in Iraq, Donald Trump once again imposed biting sanctions against the regime in Tehran. To Iranian Americans, many of whom have lived under sanctions in Iran or have family members there suffering through economic hardship, the fresh round of penalties is a painful reminder of the collateral consequences of escalating conflict.Iranian Americans across the United States told the Guardian about their worries for their family members and friends affected by US sanctions. And they spoke of the ways the policies affect their own lives, work and communities in the US. “I was raised under sanctions my entire life,” said Nazanin Asadi, 34, who left Iran for California in 2014 and now works as a law clerk in Orange county. “After moving to the US permanently, I can’t believe the sanctions and these laws are still chasing me … I don’t want my community to suffer.”The threats of a full-blown war following Trump’s 3 January order to kill Gen Qassem Suleimani caused anxiety among some Persian communities in the US, especially for Iranian families who have been torn apart by Trump’s travel ban. Trump backed away from additional strikes, but his administration implemented a fresh wave of sanctions, targeting senior Iranian officials and the country’s textile, construction, manufacturing and other sectors.The US has imposed sanctions for decades, targeting Iran’s energy sector and a range of exports of goods and services. Trump had already expanded sanctions against Iran in 2018 with his withdrawal from the nuclear deal signed under Barack Obama.Under sanctions law, people are forced to apply for specific licenses when they seek to be exempted from prohibited transactions, and even for allowed activities, there are complicated reporting requirements. In practice that means hundreds of thousands of Iranian Americans with family and financial ties to Iran can face a complex set of burdens and hurdles in their lives, jobs and education.“These sanctions are supposed to be targeting the government of Iran and certain individuals, but end up targeting the average person and your own citizens,” said Mehrnoush Yazdanyar, a California attorney who helps Iranian Americans navigate sanctions. “You’re sanctioning your own legal permanent residents, and in doing so, you’re alienating them.” ‘It is a daily stress’Yazdanyar’s law offices in southern California, a region home to the largest Iranian population outside of Iran, have assisted thousands of clients in sanctions-related matters over the years. Families often can’t send money back and forth, creating significant hurdles for Iranian Americans who want to support their parents or families in Iran who want to help their loved ones pursue their education or other dreams in America.While the regulations are supposed to allow some financial transactions through third parties, many attempting to navigate the process can end up in legal trouble or with closed or frozen bank accounts, she said.Asadi, who grew up in Iran, was accepted to the University of Southern California law school and moved here with dreams of becoming a judge. But with the sanctions blocking her parents from offering her financial support, she had to pay her own way through her education, working multiple jobs while studying.“I couldn’t afford my life, I couldn’t pay my expenses,” she said. “It was too much pressure emotionally and financially.”She scraped by and managed to graduate, and she now works with Yazdanyar helping people dealing with sanctions. But when Asadi wants to help her own parents in Iran, who are disabled, she has no way to offer them funds, pay for their medications or even buy them gifts: “We cannot support each other.”That feeling of guilt is even worse when there’s a threat of war, Asadi added: “I’m paying taxes to the government who purchases military equipment to bomb my parents in Iran … If war happens, what should I do?”Pirouz Kavehpour, a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), engineering professor, who is also Iranian American, said he had repeatedly seen his Iranian students lose access to their bank accounts due to sanctions, derailing their research and education.“It’s a daily stress … We’re international. We’re already on thin ice. If you don’t perform well, you will be sent back,” he said. “You’re a kid here and you need to live off fast food … and then you’re told by a random guy in a bank field office: ‘Don’t even think about getting the money.’”With a large wave of Iranian Americans arriving in the US after the 1979 revolution, some are also now inheriting family businesses or properties back in Iran from relatives who have died, but it is often a nightmare process to attempt and recoup the assets, said Erich Ferrari, a Washington DC-based attorney who handles sanctions cases.Even those who try to do everything right, reporting the transactions and getting proper licenses, can end up facing investigations by the US government, he said. Law enforcement monitors money transfers, and in some cases Iranian Americans have found the FBI at their doors asking questions: “There’s always a threat looming.”Ferrari said he had seen family relationships fall apart in the process, adding: “They are trying to do something that is beneficial to the US, and divest themselves from Iran and bring their money here.” Research and charity work thwarted: ‘How does the US benefit?’In addition to the recent wave of Iranian students who have been denied visas at the last minute, under sanctions law, faculty members are also barred from traveling to Iran for research or other work without approval from the US treasury department.“I’ve been invited many times to give a talk in Iran … but we are not allowed,” said Kavehpour, the UCLA professor. He noted that Iran could benefit from working with UCLA experts on autism research, but that it would be impossible to set up any collaboration.Aysan Rangchian, a 28-year-old Iranian PhD student at UCLA, said Iranian students often don’t even apply for conferences anywhere outside of the US for fear of consequences. Iranian students can also struggle to get grants and funding: “This is making the US less appealing for international students.”Last year, Iranian researchers faced criminal prosecution when they attempted to do stem-cell research in the US. As a result of that process, potentially groundbreaking science will not go forward here, said Yazdanyar: “How did the United States benefit from this?”Yazdanyar has also represented a not-for-profit organization that helps orphaned children across the world, including in Iran. Even when the group received a specific license to send aid to Iran, financial institutions in third countries have declined to assist with the transfer due to concerns about sanctions. That means humanitarian aid has been delayed and blocked, she said.During floods in Iran last year, it was painful that the sanctions blocked Iranian Americans from being able to offer basic donations, said Assal Rad, a research fellow with the National Iranian American Council, who lives in Orange county. She said that while the impact of sanctions on Iranian Americans paled in comparison with what Iranian citizens suffer, the rules added to this “constant feeling that your identity is under attack”.“Whether sanctions, the travel ban, or your loyalty being questioned … it’s really isolating,” she said, adding of sanctions: “It’s an ineffective policy that is also harming Americans themselves.”


Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycott

Malaysia's Mahathir rules out trade action over Indian palm oil boycottMalaysia will not take retaliatory trade action against India over its boycott of palm oil purchases amid a political row between the two countries, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said on Monday. "We are too small to take retaliatory action," Mahathir told reporters in Langkawi, a resort island off the western coast of Malaysia.


Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'

Trump says Soleimani killing followed general saying 'bad things'President Trump has given a new justification for killing Qassem Soleimani, telling a gathering of Republican donors that the Iranian general was “saying bad things about our country.”


Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be Different

Why the U.S.-China Cold War Will Be DifferentThis second cold war, conducted on a teeming planet whose anxiety is intensified by the passions and rages of social media, is only in its beginning stages. The aim, like in the first Cold War, is negative victory: not defeating the Chinese, but waiting them out, just as we waited the Soviets out.


Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort Bragg

Remains of fallen US soldier returned to Fort BraggThe remains of a paratrooper who was killed a week ago in Afghanistan have been returned to his family in the U.S. The family of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin greeted his flag-draped casket at Pope Army Airfield at Fort Bragg on Saturday, The Fayetteville Observer reported. The 29-year-old from Newport News, Virginia, was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.


Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bid

Turkey targets 'weakest link' Cyprus in regional dominance bidStriving to extend its influence in the eastern Mediterranean where tensions revolve around energy resources, Turkey sees Cyprus as the weakest link in a regional alliance buffering Ankara's ambitions, analysts told AFP. The bid comes as Turkey flexes its muscle across the Mediterranean from Libya to Syria, where Ankara has taken on diplomatic and military roles. Although Turkish military action is not expected against Cyprus, analysts warn Ankara will increase pressure on Nicosia to deter it from completing its energy exploration plans.


Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the week

Unsettled weather pattern to return to Northwest after tranquil start to the weekAn area of high pressure building into the Northwest through Monday will briefly offer tranquil conditions before a storm system descends on the region by midweek.Quiet conditions over the Northwest have directed the storm track farther north into Pacific Canada, resulting in heavy rain and mountain snow in western British Columbia since last week.However, the next Pacific storm will take aim farther south, bringing wet weather back to the Northwest Monday night through Tuesday."Snow levels will be higher than with previous storms, so precipitation along the I-5 corridor from Seattle to Northern California will fall in the form of rain," AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Elliott said.Even though precipitation will fall as a plain rain, motorists may experience a slower Tuesday morning commute along the I-5 corridor. Along the coast, a building westerly swell will create the threat for sneaker waves along area beaches.Beachgoers are advised to stay away from the shoreline to avoid falling victim to these large waves.The threat for wet weather will extend eastward beyond the coastal lowlands and Cascades from the storm.Kennewick and Spokane, Washington, and even Boise, Idaho, can expect wet weather to develop during the day on Tuesday.This storm system is not expected to have snow levels as low as some of the recent systems. However, with levels initially around 3,000 feet, area passes such as Snoqualmie and Stevens could still face some travel issues from Tuesday into Wednesday.The persistent pattern of unsettled weather across the Cascades and northern Sierras will continue to keep an elevated avalanche threat in place this week.As the storm system tracks into the Intermountain West by Wednesday, dry and settled conditions will come to an end.Wintry weather is likely for places like Salt Lake City, Utah, and Yellowstone National Park. While major accumulations are not expected, it will prove beneficial for area ski resorts.AccuWeather meteorologists predict the unsettled pattern will likely continue into late week across the Northwest.A lack of Arctic intrusions will also continue to keep snow levels higher than average for this time of year.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair loss

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley just posted a first bald selfie, and she says alopecia is at the root of her hair lossPressley, who's been famous for her Senegalese twists, said she first started noticing patches of her hair falling out last fall. She's now bald.


Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a memento

Man kills grizzly in self-defense, keeps claws as a mementoA Montana man told authorities that he cut off a grizzly bear's claws as a memento after shooting it in self-defense because he was mad that the bear was going to eat him, according to court records. Bryan Berg, 35, appeared in court on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Missoula after pleading guilty to illegal transport of grizzly bear claws, a misdemeanor, according to the Flathead Beacon. Grizzly bears in northwestern Montana are classified as a threatened species.


‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidate

‘Middle Class’ Joe Biden has a corruption problem – it makes him a weak candidateWe don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil Democrats are trying to choose a candidate to beat Donald Trump, the most corrupt president in history. Some think nominating Joe Biden, a moderate white man who calls himself “Middle Class” Joe, makes sense.But Biden has a big corruption problem and it makes him a weak candidate. I know it seems crazy, but a lot of the voters we need – independents and people who might stay home – will look at Biden and Trump and say: “They’re all dirty.”It looks like “Middle Class” Joe has perfected the art of taking big contributions, then representing his corporate donors at the cost of middle- and working-class Americans. Converting campaign contributions into legislative favors and policy positions isn’t being “moderate”. It is the kind of transactional politics Americans have come to loathe.There are three clear examples.First, Biden’s support for finance over working-class Americans. His career was bankrolled by the credit card industry. He delivered for it by spearheading a bankruptcy bill that made it harder for Americans to reduce their debts and helped cause the financial crisis. He not only authored and voted for that bill, he split with Barack Obama and led the battle to vote down Democratic amendments.His explanations for carrying water for the credit card industry have changed over time. They have never rung true.> Nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat TrumpThe simplest explanation is the most likely: he did it for his donors. At a fundraiser last year, Biden promised his Wall Street donors that “nothing would fundamentally change” for them if he became president. Now the financial world is raising huge money for his campaign. It clearly thinks he’s going to be its friend if elected. Most Americans, who get ripped off by the financial sector on a daily basis, aren’t looking for a candidate who has made their life harder.Second, healthcare. On 25 April, the day he announced his campaign, Biden went straight to a fundraiser co-hosted by the chief executive of a major health insurance corporation. He refuses to sign a pledge to reject money from insurance and pharma execs and continues to raise money from healthcare industry donors. His campaign is being bankrolled by a super Pac run by healthcare lobbyists.What did all these donors get? A healthcare proposal that preserves the power of the insurance industry and leaves 10 million Americans uninsured.Third, climate change. Biden signed a pledge not to take money from the fossil fuel industry, then broke his promise. Right after a CNN town hall on climate change, he held a fundraiser hosted by the founder of a fossil fuel conglomerate. He is pushing climate policy that has gotten dismal reviews from several leading environmental groups.There are plenty of other examples that raise questions, like housing and social security. Big real estate moguls are playing a major role in Biden’s campaign. Unlike his rivals, he has no comprehensive housing plan. When he pushed for cuts to Social Security, was he serving donors or his constituents?I can already hear the howls: But look at Trump! Trump is 1,000 times worse!You don’t need to convince me. I have spent my life writing about and fighting against corruption, and in America I have never seen anything like the current administration. In the last three years, I have made combatting Trump’s corruption the heart of my work.I was on the first lawsuit against him for corrupt constitutional violations and I ran for attorney general in New York on a platform of pointing out just how dangerous he is, and how important unused state laws are to stopping him. My work on corruption was cited in the House judiciary committee’s report on impeachment.> 2020 should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and crueltyBut here’s the thing: nominating a candidate like Biden will make it far more difficult to defeat Trump. It will allow Trump to muddy the water, to once again pretend he is the one “draining the swamp”, running against Washington culture. Trump and the Cambridge Analytica of 2020 will campaign, as they did in 2016, on a message of radical nihilism: everybody lies, everybody is corrupt, nothing matters, there is no truth.Corrupt politicians always use whataboutism. With Biden, we are basically handing Trump a whataboutism playbook. The comparison won’t be fair, but if you think he won’t use Biden’s closeness to donors as a cudgel to try to keep people home, you haven’t been paying attention. Unlike Democrats, who must give voters a reason to come out, Trump doesn’t need voters to love him. He just needs to convince people the whole game is ugly.Whether or not Biden is making choices to please donors, there is no doubt his record represents the transactional, grossly corrupt culture in Washington that long precedes Trump. We cannot allow Trump to so lower our standards that we aren’t even allowed to call out that culture, which has not only stymied progress but also harmed the Democratic party.The good news is that we still have time to break with this culture of corruption. We don’t have to choose Biden’s way, which would give Trump a perfect foil. The 2020 election should be about a crystal clear contrast between truth and lies, corruption and integrity, compassion and cruelty.We have a rare opportunity to end a larger culture of corruption and we should take it – we will regret it if we don’t. * Zephyr Teachout, an associate professor at Fordham Law School, is the author of Corruption in America: From Ben Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United. Her next book is Break ’Em Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money. She has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president.


Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte dies

Founder of South Korean retail giant Lotte diesLotte Group founder Shin Kyuk-ho, who started manufacturing chewing gum in 1948 in Japan and built the business into South Korea's No.5 conglomerate with interests ranging from retail to chemicals, died on Sunday, the company said. Lotte was founded in 1948 as a chewing gum maker in Japan by Shin, who moved to the neighbouring country when the Korean peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule.