Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for trips

Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for tripsBurisma gave more than $450,000 to the Atlantic Council, a prominent Washington think tank.


PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rain

PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rainTourists and Venetians alike have donned high boots and taken to temporary raised walkways to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city.


Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian Reaction

Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian ReactionLeah Millis/ReutersUnder Mick Mulvaney’s leadership, the Office of Management and Budget temporarily put a hold on the delivery of anti-tank missiles to Ukraine in 2017 because of concerns their arrival would upset Russia, according to former White House official Catherine Croft. She described OMB’s objection as “highly unusual.”Croft’s testimony indicates that concerns about the U.S. relationship with Russia had a direct—though short-lived—impact on U.S./Ukraine policy in the first year of Trump’s presidency.Croft told congressional impeachment investigators that after the Trump administration greenlit the delivery of Javelin missiles to Ukraine in late 2017—the first delivery of lethal aid to the country since Russian separatists seized territory in its Eastern region in 2014—Mulvaney’s office held it up. “Did you understand why?” asked the congressional staffer questioning her. “I understood the reason to be a policy one,” she replied. “What was the policy one?” “In a briefing with Mick Mulvaney, the question centered around the Russian reaction,” she continued. “What was the concern about the Russian reaction?” asked the staffer. “That Russia would react negatively to the provision of Javelins to Ukraine,” she said. The Daily Beast first reported last month that OMB held up the 2017 shipment of Javelins to Ukraine. Croft said the hold lasted “about a week or two,” and that “all of the policy agencies” wanted the aid to go to Ukraine. She said OMB’s interest in the decision about whether to send Javelins to Ukraine was abnormal. Key Impeachment Witnesses Finger Mulvaney In the Quid Pro Quo“[It] was rather unusual to have OMB expressing concerns that were purely policy-based and not budget-oriented,” she said. “At the beginning of the Ukrainian Javelin process, I had been told that OMB was taking a policy interest,” she continued. “And OMB began sending working level officials to attend meetings... which was very unusual at the time.” She noted that OMB staff also started attending meetings regarding aid to countries besides Ukraine and that the increase in their involvement was “quite taxing on a very small organization.”Mulvaney and several other OMB officials have refused to participate in the congressional impeachment inquiry. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurtPirates attacked an Italy-flagged offshore supply vessel in the southern Gulf of Mexico, injuring two crew members, the Mexican Navy said on Tuesday, in the latest outbreak of robbery and piracy to hit oil platforms and infrastructure in the area. Owned by Italian offshore contractor Micoperi, the boat is a supply vessel for Mexico's oil industry. Micoperi and the Italian embassy in Mexico did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergarten

51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergartenMore than 50 people, mostly children, were injured by a man who broke into a kindergarten in southwest China and sprayed them with corrosive liquid, local authorities said Tuesday. The suspect, a 23-year-old surnamed Kong, entered the kindergarten by climbing a wall before spraying victims with sodium hydroxide, said local authorities in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province. The attack took place on Monday at 3:35 pm (0735 GMT), authorities said on their Twitter-like Weibo account.


Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estate

Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estateA woman who confronted Jeffrey Epstein at a July bail hearing to tell a judge he touched her inappropriately when she was 16 sued his estate Tuesday, alleging he had subjected her to sex trafficking as part of his attacks on young women and girls. Lawyers for Annie Farmer filed the lawsuit in Manhattan federal court, along with a lawsuit on behalf of her sister, Maria Farmer, and Teresa Helm, an Ohio woman. A lawyer for Epstein's estate did not return a message seeking comment.


Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia commentsTulsi Gabbard's lawyers want Hillary Clinton to make her retraction at a press conference and on social media.


How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?

How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?Though Germany eventually lost World War II and France again ended up on the victorious side, the leadership traits demonstrated before and during the battle in 1940 are textbook examples of what makes for great leadership—and what kind of leadership leads to defeat.


Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearing

Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearingA Connecticut man charged in the death of a hotel worker he says attacked his family in Anguilla has declined to return to the British Caribbean territory for the latest pretrial hearing, a spokesman said Monday. Scott Hapgood, of Darien, is worried about his safety in light of death threats, and Anguilla officials have not provided assurances that he would be allowed to return home on bond after the hearing, family spokesman Jamie Diaferia said. Anguilla officials rejected an offer for Hapgood to appear by video link for Monday's hearing, Diaferia said.


Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’

Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice said Monday that reports detailing the involvement of President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in the White House’s Ukraine policy were “deeply troubling.”“What I see right now troubles me. I see a state of conflict between the foreign policy professionals and someone who says he’s acting on behalf of the president but frankly I don’t know if that is the case,” Rice said at a conference in Abu Dhabi. “This is just not a good thing. The world shouldn’t get confusing messages from the United States of America.”Multiple witnesses have alleged in house testimony that Giuliani conducted his own investigative work without regard for the administration’s formal policy.William Taylor, the former top American diplomat in Ukraine, whose testimony was released last week, asserted that Giuliani was actively undermining U.S. foreign policy.“The irregular channel seemed to focus on specific issues, specific cases, rather than the regular channel’s focus on institution building,” Taylor said, according to the transcript. “So the irregular channel, I think under the influence of Mr. Giuliani, wanted to focus on one or two specific cases, irrespective of whether it helped solve the corruption problem, fight the corruption problem.”Earlier Monday, news broke that Lev Parnas, an associate of Giuliani, will tell investigators that Giuliani attempted to leverage an official visit from Vice President Mike Pence to coax Ukraine into announcing an investigation into Joe Biden's son Hunter's business connections to Burisma.Rice also said she thought Trump’s mention of former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma, during the call was “out of bounds.”“The call is murky, it is really murky. I don’t like for the president of the United States to mention an American citizen for investigation to a foreign leader,” Rice said.


Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020

Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020Hillary Clinton on Tuesday declined to rule out launching a future presidential campaign after her two failed bids, saying “many, many, many people” were pressuring her to enter the race.


Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight

Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight(Bloomberg) -- Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has done his best to keep a low profile in the 13 months since one of the most polarizing Senate confirmation fights in U.S. history.From the bench, his questions have been evenhanded and his opinions have been measured. His public appearances have been rare.But Kavanaugh will be back in the spotlight when he gives the featured dinner speech on Thursday at the annual Washington convention of the Federalist Society, the powerful conservative legal group that helped put him on the court.The appearance, in front of an organization Kavanaugh joined in 1988 as a law student, will offer a reminder of his professional roots and help showcase the group’s success in helping load the federal courts with conservative judges -- one of President Donald Trump’s signature achievements.It will also provide a fresh indication of how the Supreme Court’s most controversial justice will navigate the raw feelings that remain after his nomination by Trump and narrow Senate confirmation in the face of sexual assault allegations.About 2,300 people are expected to attend the Antonin Scalia Memorial Dinner, a black-tie-optional event that brings legal luminaries to the cavernous Main Hall of Washington’s Union Station every year. The event will be open to the media, though broadcast coverage will be prohibited.When many Americans last saw Kavanaugh, he was at his Senate confirmation hearing angrily and tearfully denying that he had assaulted Christine Blasey Ford decades ago when both were teenagers.“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election,” Kavanaugh said, with rage that would later be lampooned by actor Matt Damon on “Saturday Night Live.”He was confirmed on a 50-48 vote.‘Gracious’ JusticeThat Brett Kavanaugh bears little resemblance to the one who now sits at one end of the Supreme Court bench, seen only by the few hundred people who typically attend its camera-free argument sessions.Kavanaugh tends to politely challenge both sides during arguments, almost always without tipping his hand on his own views. He often chats amicably with Justice Elena Kagan, who sits to his right and seems to have far more to discuss with him than with Justice Samuel Alito on her other side.“He seems quite comfortable,” said Carter Phillips, a veteran Supreme Court lawyer at Sidley Austin. “He’s very gracious, extremely well-prepared. His questions are good.”Kavanaugh’s written opinions have generally been measured. Though he has almost always voted with his conservative colleagues when the court splits along ideological lines, he has eschewed the sweeping rhetoric of Trump’s other Supreme Court appointee, Neil Gorsuch. On occasion, Kavanaugh has written separate opinions to describe his position as a limited one.“He appears more cautious and pragmatic than Gorsuch, but it’s too early to tell too much,” said Jonathan Adler, a professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.Kavanaugh’s colleagues have publicly welcomed him and said they don’t harbor any ill feelings.“We are all human beings, we all have pasts,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor told a judicial conference in September, according to the Wall Street Journal. “Now whether things occurred or didn’t occur, all of that is irrelevant.”Female ClerksJustice Ruth Bader Ginsburg praised Kavanaugh for hiring four women to serve as his law clerks for his first term, something no justice had done in any term.That decision is as close as Kavanaugh has come to publicly addressing the confirmation controversy since he joined the court.“It was all women, and I think that was not coincidental,” said Melissa Murray, a New York University law professor who testified during the confirmation hearing that she was concerned Kavanaugh would vote to overturn abortion rights. “I think it was intended to be a rebuttal to those who believe those allegations, took those allegations seriously. I think he wanted to sort of counteract the perception that might have been left after the confirmation hearing.”For the public at large, Kavanaugh remains a polarizing figure -- far more so than his longer-serving colleagues. A Marquette Law School poll conducted in September found that 32% of respondents had an unfavorable view of Kavanaugh, with 26% holding a favorable view. No other justice had an unfavorable rating higher than 23%.Though he has met privately with smaller groups, the Federalist Society speech will mark only the second time Kavanaugh has spoken publicly outside the court since the White House ceremony that followed his October 2018 confirmation. Kavanaugh appeared in May with the man he succeeded, Justice Anthony Kennedy, before a conference of judges and lawyers.Standing OvationKavanaugh’s reception at the Federalist Society event is all but certain to be positive, probably overwhelmingly so, though it’s possible he’ll face protests.“I expect he’ll get a very warm reception,” said Adler, a Federalist Society member who plans to attend.Kavanaugh got a lengthy standing ovation when he arrived for last year’s dinner, which took place less than six weeks after the Senate vote. He opted not to give a talk at that event, instead agreeing to speak this year, according to two people familiar with the planning.The Federalist Society’s executive vice president, Leonard Leo, has served as a key adviser to Trump on judicial nominations. Leo declined to be interviewed about Kavanaugh’s work on the court, saying he generally doesn’t comment on individual justices.The dinner is part of a three-day program that features speeches by Gorsuch and Attorney General Bill Barr as well as panel discussions on a plethora of legal topics.“I think it is meaningful that he’s choosing to make a debut of sorts at this particular venue,” Murray said.Chances are Kavanaugh’s speech will steer clear of any discussion of the confirmation controversy. He probably will at least touch on the judicial philosophy that made him a Federalist Society favorite in the first place. He might show the side of himself that promised at his confirmation hearing to be part of a “team of nine” on the court.“I think it will be different than it was in his last public appearance,” said Phillips with a laugh. “He is by nature a gracious and even-tempered person. I expect that that’s the way he will come across.”To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay bar

Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay barA Ugandan court charged 67 people with causing a nuisance on Tuesday after they were arrested in a gay-friendly bar, in a move condemned by activists as the latest "homophobic" attack. The 67 - who were among 127 arrested at Ram Bar, in the capital, Kampala, on Sunday - could face up to one year in jail if found guilty, said Patricia Kimera, a lawyer for the group. "This is just a homophobic attack," LGBT+ activist Raymond Karuhanga told the Thomson Reuters Foundation outside the court.


See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel


With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil War

With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarA traffic police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed 21-year-old pro-democracy protester at point-blank range on Monday. Hours later, a man was set on fire after defending Beijing in an argument. Both individuals were listed in critical condition.Over the weekend, wide-scale disturbances scarred the territory, a semi-autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China. There is essentially a rebellion in Hong Kong. Riot police in green uniforms are doing battle with youthful demonstrators dressed in black. How Hong Kong Protesters Show Which Businesses Are Friend or FoeProtests began in April after Chief Executive Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s top official, proposed legislation authorizing the extradition of fugitives to various jurisdictions, including Mainland China. Starting June 9, when an estimated one million Hong Kongers marched in the streets, demonstrations have been almost continuous. Lam has since permanently withdrawn the extradition bill from consideration, but the protests have not abated. Especially this week. Hong Kong braced for a weekend of disturbances after Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died on Friday after falling from a car park the preceding Sunday while running away from police tear gas. Many have accused the police of delaying medical assistance to the mortally injured Chow.Chow has been called “the first fatality linked to police action during a protest,” but many believe the police have killed others. Demonstrators believe three of their number were beaten to death on August 31 in the Prince Edward Mass Transit Railway station in Mong Kok. Since then, the above-ground entrance to the station has become a shrine, protestors have repeatedly rallied in front of the adjacent Mong Kok police station, and youth have continually trashed MTR trains and stations because they believe management of the rail system has withheld surveillance-camera footage.Even a single death creates a cycle of revenge and retaliation that is almost impossible to control. Chow’s passing sparked a weekend of rage.Moreover, Chief Executive Lam added to the tensions. In her most recent press conference, held Monday after the shooting and burning incidents, she called protesters the “enemy of the people.” Her provocative Cultural Revolution-speak comment came on the heels of her November 4 meeting with Chinese ruler Xi Jinping. China is apparently controlling events, and either out of obliviousness or maliciousness, it is making the situation worse. Beijing has been doing that by forcing Lam to take a hard line. Apart from the withdrawal of the extradition bill—doomed because the normally pro-Beijing business community came out against it early on—she has been intransigent. That intransigence was evident from her Monday remarks. She said she would not yield to violence, but she had previously left Hong Kong people no choice. She had, with her stubbornness, earlier foreclosed the possibility of peaceful change.Hong Kong people may not be able to change her mind, but she cannot change theirs either. The army in black—as well as many other people in the territory—have continued to protest.Analysts say Beijing will eventually lose patience and use force. “This kind of extreme, violent, and destructive activity would not be tolerated or accepted in any country or society in the world nowadays,” said Chinese Vice-Premier Han Zheng as he met with Lam early this month in Beijing.Han’s words were taken as a threat to formally deploy units of the People’s Liberation Army or the People’s Armed Police to the streets of Hong Kong to “crush” the protests and reestablish order. Beijing could move in troops, but the move is unlikely to work. Hong Kong, after all, is ideal territory for defenders, like guerilla fighters supported by an overwhelming portion of the public. Every apartment building there is a fort where hostiles can rain down explosives or petrol bombs on Chinese troops and then disappear into their homes or back alleys. Xi Jinping surely does not want his first war to take tens of thousands of soldiers, last years if not decades, and end in a loss for China.In the meantime, there is credible evidence suggesting Mainland Chinese personnel—troops or police—are now operating on Hong Kong streets in police uniforms. This sly tactic is not working, however. Why not? The Hong Kong police department, once considered the most professional force of its kind in Asia, has lost discipline, something evident from the shooting of the protester Monday and countless other incidents. The breakdown in discipline roughly coincides with early evidence that Chinese forces were mixed in with the Hong Kong police, and the resulting rough tactics have resulted in a loss of support of ordinary residents tired of being tear gassed, clubbed, and manhandled. All this raises the question whether Beijing has given the green light to police officers to act as brutally as they want. Yet whether China did so or not, harsh action by the police is sustaining support for the protesters. Demonstrators this past weekend were chanting “Revenge.” Hong Kong is now at war with itself. There is no end in sight to the fighting.LeBron James Bends the Knee to China, Fails His First Big Test as the NBA’s ConscienceRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack Obama

Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack ObamaPete Buttigieg got in hot water with many loyal Democrats on Sunday when the Los Angeles Times reported that he cited the "failures of the Obama era" as part of why Trump's election happened. This inspired furious outrage from liberal partisans and party apparatchiks -- only soothed (and tweets deleted) when the reporter said he had misquoted Buttigieg, who was then quick to lavish praise on the ex-president.But as it turns out, Buttigieg previously said almost the exact same thing in a recent interview with Showtime's The Circus. "I don't think there's going back to Obama... the American political world we've been in from the day I was born, has been blown up," he explained, "[thanks to] its own failures which culminated in Trump. Look, if the old way worked, something like Trump would never have been possible."So this recent flap sure looks like another flip-flop from Payola Pete, mayor of Indiana's fourth largest city. But at least in his beta release form, I have to admit that Buttigieg was completely correct. Democrats really need to get over this worshipful reverence of Barack Obama.For one thing, it is simply beyond question that the Obama years were a political disaster. From having commanding majorities in both the House and the Senate, Democrats lost first the former, then the latter, and finally the presidency, as the candidate running as Obama's successor bobbled perhaps the easiest lay-up election in American history. Meanwhile, the party all but collapsed in many states, as devastating national defeats translated into the loss of over 1,000 state legislative seats.As I have written before, the primary reason for the Obama-era Democrats' initial crushing loss in 2010, which locked in Republican gains for a decade at least through their ensuing control of the state gerrymandering process, was policy error -- undershooting the size of the economic stimulus in response to the Great Recession on the one hand, and secretly using homeowner assistance money to bail out the banks on the other. The former was not entirely Obama's fault, as he had to get congressional approval for the stimulus, but the latter was entirely under his control. Millions were left out of work, and about 10 million people losing their homes wreaked further economic devastation. As any historian could tell you, being in power during a huge economic disaster is the surest possible way to get blown out of the water in the next election.If you take Obama out of the equation, what Buttigieg was saying before it looks like folks might stop sending those fat campaign checks is all but conventional wisdom even among liberals. Obama himself reportedly has grave doubts about what Trump means for his legacy. Clearly if the party could lose to the most unpopular major party nominee in the history of polling, whatever was happening before 2016 was not exactly working out.And from the other side of the fence, Obama has shown no inclination to fulfill the sort of leadership role loyal Democrats clearly crave. Despite the shattering national crisis that Trump presents, he has not gone on to a different office -- unlike, say, John Quincy Adams, who returned to the House after his presidency and fought slavery literally until his dying breath. Obama is not out there mobilizing day and night against Trump's migrant concentration camps, or his Muslim ban, or his blatant abuses of power.Only occasionally will Obama pop up to endorse candidates, often centrist or center-right white men like Emmanuel Macron or Justin Trudeau. He largely avoided campaigning in 2018 until the last few weeks before the election. He's mainly keeping to himself, hanging out with rich tycoons and celebrities, and making eye-popping sums giving paid speeches before big corporations and banks.He appears in public only occasionally -- and when he does, he has a tendency to indulge in get-off-my-lawn youth scolding that, as Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote back in 2013, was offensive and out of date when he did it as president. "This idea of purity and you're never compromised and you're always politically 'woke' and all that stuff," he said at a recent Obama Foundation summit. "You should get over that quickly. The world is messy, there are ambiguities." Just like the time when "we tortured some folks," but it was still important to "look forward as opposed to backwards" instead of enforcing the law, I suppose.Jokes aside, this almost beggars belief. President Trump is flagrantly stealing money from the American state, attempting to get foreign countries to gin up political persecutions of Obama's own vice president, and Obama is out here raising worries about exaggerated nonsense from America's most dimwitted and gullible columnists, and earning praise from loathsome trolls:> Good for Obama. (Not sarcastic!) https://t.co/cwq5mcDc7V> > -- Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) October 30, 2019Now, let me be clear: All this is, of course, Obama's complete right as a private citizen. It is, at least for the moment, still a free country. But Democrats should not follow the advice of the Washington Post's Jennifer Rubin, who argues that "it is unheard of for a party following a two-term president not to run on his achievements," in part because "Republicans did that with former president Ronald Reagan for 30 years." She would know, from her previous incarnation as a prolific and absolutely shameless propagandist for Mitt Romney. But the grim fate of the GOP is precisely the problem.We see today what you get when a party loses the ability to think critically about its history, and treats its leaders as infallible saints no matter what they do: Donald Trump.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)

America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)Russia and China have their own plans.


Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viral

Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viralA substitute teacher has been fired and charged with aggravated assault following the beating of a 15-year-old female high school student in an incident captured on video. Tiffani Shadell Lankford is free on $10,000 bond after her arrest Friday afternoon. Video of last week's incident in a foreign-language class at Lehman High School in Kyle, Texas, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Austin went viral.


Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet Altan

Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet AltanTurkish police acting on a court order rearrested journalist and novelist Ahmet Altan Tuesday, just a week after his release from prison over alleged links to the failed 2016 coup. Altan and another veteran journalist Nazli Ilicak were released on November 4 despite having been convicted of "helping a terrorist group". The Istanbul court sentenced Altan to more than 10 years in jail, but ruled that he and Ilicak should be released under supervision after time already served -- around three years each.


Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales

Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales* Ex-president’s party refuses to recognise senator’s claim * Morales says army told him of $50,000 price on his headJeanine Añez waves from the balcony of the Quemado Palace in La Paz after claiming Bolivia’s interim presidency. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Bolivian senator Jeanine Añez has declared herself the country’s interim president after the resignation of Evo Morales, even though lawmakers from his party boycotted the legislative session where she assumed office.Añez, 52, took temporary control of the Senate late on Tuesday. “I will take the measures necessary to pacify the country,” she said, swearing on a bible to loud cheers and applause. The move is expected to pave the way for fresh elections.Morales’s Movement Towards Socialism called the session illegal and its legislators refused to take part. Nearby hundreds of Morales supporters marched against Añez assuming the role. “She’s declared herself president without having a quorum in the parliament,” Julio Chipana told the Guardian. “She doesn’t represent us.”Morales, who resigned under pressure from police and the army after a fiercely disputed election, has flown into exile in Mexico, leaving a confused power vacuum behind in Bolivia. Speaking at a hastily organised press conference on the tarmac, the former president thanked Mexico for “saving my life” and repeated his accusation that his rivals had forced him out in a coup.He said that before his resignation on Sunday a member of the army had showed him messages putting a $50,000 price on his head.“I thought we had finished with the discrimination and the humiliation, but new groups have emerged that have no respect for life, let alone for the fatherland,” Morales said. “It’s another lesson to learn.”Morales, 60, was greeted with a handshake, a hug and a pat on the cheek from Mexico’s foreign minister, Marcelo Ebrard, after the flight in a Mexican army plane from the Bolivian city of Cochabamba.He defended his time in government and said that if he were guilty any crime, it was to be indigenous and “anti-imperalist”.Morales was accompanied by his former vice-president, Álvaro García Linera, who has been his closest political collaborator since before he became Bolivia’s first indigenous president in modern times.“García Linera and I have always been committed to the idea that peace can only come with social justice,” Morales said. “This coup is not going to change our ideology.”Though he promised that this was not the end of his political career, the Bolivian leader gave no indication of his immediate plans.Morales left behind a country close to chaos as supporters and opponents clashed on the streets, amid reports of fresh looting, vandalism and arson after the October election, which the Organisation of American States found to have been rigged in his favour.On Tuesday much of Bolivia’s main city, La Paz, was like a ghost town after police warned inhabitants to stay indoors. Roadblocks were thrown up across the city as the political uncertainty continued and residents feared more violent clashes.The country remained in political limbo as senators and deputies loyal to the former leader appeared to refuse to endorse the new interim president, deputy senate leader Jeanine Áñez.“The people who have been in all these protests want us to call presidential elections which are not fraudulent, which are trustworthy,” Áñez, a political opponent of Morales, told journalists in the national assembly building.Shirley Franco, an opposition member of parliament, said: “What Bolivians want in this moment of crisis is certainty and we, the maximum authorities in this country, must work to re-establish democracy.”Manning a makeshift barricade a few blocks away, anti-Morales protester Danella Ormachea, 29, said: “We want this to end. We need a new interim president to call new elections so there is democracy and our vote is respected. That’s all we ask.”Martín Cornejo Choque, a rural leader in La Paz province, denied there had been voter fraud.“Before the election, the right said if Evo Morales wins we won’t recognise it. The opposition just don’t want to recognise the votes of the rural areas,” he said.Cornejo, who led dozens of communities to La Paz’s San Francisco square in support of Morales, said Morales had transformed life for rural Bolivians.“Before when there were rightwing, neoliberal presidents they never cared about the peasant farmer. We lived in extreme poverty,” said Cornejo. “Our roads were not paved, we didn’t even have bridges but today, thanks to this government, all the peasant communities have development.”Morales’s sudden departure was a dramatic fall for the former coca growers’ union leader who swept to power 14 years ago in a historic election.He went on to win two more landslide victories and lifted millions out of poverty, but Morales’s popularity began to wane in 2016, when he ignored a referendum in which voters said he could not run for a fourth term.Mass protests broke out after last month’s election following an unexplained 24-hour halt in the voting which fuelled accusations of electoral fraud.Áñez denied that Morales had been the victim of a coup, saying: “What happened in Bolivia was the verification of monumental fraud. A coup d’etat is when there are soldiers in the streets.”Neighbouring countries’ responses to the ousting of Morales have reflected the ideological divisions of a continent where populism on the right and the left has been on the rise once again.Those backing Morales included Venezuela’s embattled leader Nicolás Maduro, Nicaragua’s seemingly eternal president Daniel Ortega, and Cuba’s Miguel Díaz-Canel.This camp also includes Brazil’s former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who blamed it on Latin America’s “economic elite”, and Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández, who said it returned the region to “the bad days of the 70s”.Brazil’s current far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, has been the loudest voice against Morales. “The left uses the word ‘coup’ a lot when it loses, right?” he told O Globo.Other regional leaders have avoided the subject – most notably Chile’s conservative president, Sebastián Piñera, who is clinging to power in the face of a wave of social unrest. His government issued a statement calling for a peaceful and democratic solution. Similar statements have come out of Peru and Colombia.Beyond the region, Donald Trump said that Morales’s resignation “preserves democracy”, while in the UK the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn condemned the “coup against the Bolivian people”.Oliver Stuenkel, an international relations professor at Fundação Getúlio Vargas University in São Paulo, said that describing what happened in Bolivia as a coup did not necessarily imply that Morales had respected democratic norms.“In fact, non-democratic governments are often overthrown through non-democratic means, precisely because they cannot easily be voted out of office,” he tweeted.Meanwhile, Mexico’s very public offer of asylum – which was made before Morales had even asked for it – has prompted some critics of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to accuse him of seeking a distraction from the country’s own security crisis.On Tuesday, Ebrard insisted it fell squarely within a long tradition in which Mexico has provided safety for persecuted political leaders, from Leon Trotsky to activists who fled Argentina and Chile during the military dictatorships of the 70s and 80s.“This is a tradition we should be proud of and continue,” Ebrard said on Tuesday.


A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China

A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China


Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secrets

Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secretsA Chinese national pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing trade secrets from U.S. petroleum company Phillips 66 , where he worked on the research and development of next generation battery technologies, the U.S. Justice Department said. Hongjin Tan, 36, stole information regarding the manufacture of a "research and development downstream energy market product" that is worth more than $1 billion, the department said in a statement. The department identified the company where he worked as Phillips 66 in court documents filed in Oklahoma.


Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPA

Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPAThe mercury rule has protected Americans from dangerous pollution. Changing it threatens gains that include cleaner air and edible seafood.


Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's why

Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's whyWhy aren't more credibly accused Catholic priests in prison? Blame it on laws that don't allow enough time for abuse survivors to come forward


A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eating

A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eatingBay Area Rapid Transit police said Steve Foster, of Concord, California, violated state law by eating a sandwich on a BART station's platform.


Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in Syria

Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in SyriaA defense industry source told Russian news outlet Izvestia last month that the S-500 recently underwent field testing in Syria, where the Russian Aerospace Forces continue to maintain a significant presence. Moscow denied it--but won't dey what they think this air defense platform could do in battle.


Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptopsA federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry. ACLU attorney Esha Bhandari said the ruling strengthens the Fourth Amendment protections of international travelers who enter the United States every year.


Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech

Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech(Bloomberg) -- Former Brazil President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gave a strong speech on Saturday to a crowd of supporters gathered in front of a metalworkers union headquarters outside the city of Sao Paulo. He criticized the Carwash corruption probe and the market-friendly agenda that is being implemented by President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration and Economy Minister Paulo Guedes’ team. Bolsonaro and his ministers struck back, while military army representatives worry about the risk of violence, according to the local newspapers.Criticism of Guedes“I doubt that the dream-destroying minister, the job-destroyer, the destroyer of Brazilian public companies called Guedes, sleeps with a clear conscience,” Lula said in a speech on Saturday. At the same time, Lula said that Bolsonaro was democratically elected and that the result must be accepted.Lula’s TravelsLula has pledged to travel around Brazil and Latin America, offering support for leftist leaders at a moment when the region is engulfed by growing political turmoil. Lula is expected to start his tour in the Northeast of Brazil, this Sunday, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Bolsonaro’s ReplyBolsonaro broke his silence about Lula’s release and wrote that he will not respond to “criminals who are now free,” via Twitter. Bolsonaro also met top military officials on Saturday morning to assess the outlook after the former president’s release, according to Estado.Military Concern Among the military, there is concern that Lula’s speech may incite violence, according to Estado. According to Folha de S.Paulo, the army fears the risk of radicalization between Bolsonaro and Lula’s supporters, but considers that both were reasonably reserved in their initial comments.CounterattackGuedes’s team is preparing for ways to counter Lula’s speeches. The ministry is betting on the argument that the economy is gaining steam, and that the government has released money, such as the FGTS funds, without cutting benefits, according to Folha. Bolsonaro also endorsed Justice Minister Sergio Moro’s reaction to Lula, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Moro has become a key player in Bolsonaro’s strategy of confronting Lula. The president himself accused Lula of causing the stock market drop on Friday:Agenda Keeps Advancing The government is set to launch a package to encourage the hiring of young and old people. The pension reform may be enacted on Tuesday, while the Senate is expected to complete the first round vote a constitutional amendment to include states and municipalities in the pension reform. The government is expected send a proposal for public administration reform to the lower house. Congress also looks set to speed up debate about jail time for convicts, following last week’s Supreme Court decision.ObstructionBrazil parties pledge to obstruct other agenda items in order to discuss imprisonment. Podemos and Novo parties will obstruct the lower house’s plenary and committees until a constitutional amendment proposal dealing with the rule on imprisonment after first appeal is voted on. Moro also defended the amendment.Bolsonaro about BoliviaLula and Bolsonaro’s reactions to the crisis in Bolivia reflect the growing polarization in Brazil. While Lula called it a “coup,” Bolsonaro said the word “coup” is only used when the left loses, according to O Globo.Other highlightsBolsonaro has sold 91 billion reais in assets of Banco do Brasil, Petrobras and Caixa: Folha de S.PauloGovernment arranges meetings with international oil companies: Valor EconomicoInfrastructure studies fusion between three state-owned transport area: Valor EconomicoNewspaper Top StoriesO Estado de S. Paulo, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo Newspapers highlight Evo Morales’ resignation in BoliviaValor EconomicoReports that only 6% of cities meet basic sanitation goalsTo contact the translation editor responsible for this story: Matthew Malinowski at mmalinowski@bloomberg.netReporter on the original story: Fernando Travaglini in in São Paulo at ftravaglini@bloomberg.netEditors responsible for the original story: Daniela Milanese at dmilanese@bloomberg.net, Josue LeonelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation reveals

Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation revealsEmails to former Breitbart writer show Miller focused on inserting white nationalist talking points to shape 2016 election coverageStephen Miller, senior adviser to Donald Trump, walks across the South Lawn of the White House on 4 November. Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPASenior Trump adviser Stephen Miller shaped the 2016 election coverage of the hard right-wing website Breitbart with material drawn from prominent white nationalists, Islamophobes, and far-right websites, according to a new investigative report by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).Miller also railed against those wishing to remove Confederate monuments and flags from public display in the wake of Dylann Roof’s murderous 2015 attack on a black church in Charleston, South Carolina, and praised America’s early 20th-century race-based, restrictionist immigration policies.Emails from Miller to a former Breitbart writer, sent before and after he joined the Trump campaign, show Miller obsessively focused on injecting white nationalist-style talking points on race and crime, Confederate monuments, and Islam into the far-right website’s campaign coverage, the SPLC report says.Miller, one of the few surviving initial appointees in the administration, has been credited with orchestrating Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies.The SPLC story is based largely on emails provided by a former Breitbart writer, Katie McHugh. McHugh was fired by Breitbart over a series of anti-Muslim tweets and has since renounced the far right, telling the SPLC that the movement is “evil”.However, throughout 2015 and 2016, as the Trump campaign progressed and she became an increasingly influential voice at Breitbart, McHugh told the SPLC that Miller urged her in a steady drumbeat of emails and phone calls to promote arguments from sources popular with far-right and white nationalist movements.Miller’s emails had a “strikingly narrow” focus on race and immigration, according to the SPLC report.At various times, the SPLC reports, Miller recommendations for McHugh included the white nationalist website, VDare; Camp of the Saints, a racist novel focused on a “replacement” of European whites by mass third-world immigration; conspiracy site Infowars; and Refugee Resettlement Watch, a fringe anti-immigrant site whose tagline is “They are changing America by changing the people”.McHugh also says that in a phone call, Miller suggested that she promote an analysis of race and crime featured on the website of a white nationalist organization, American Renaissance. The American Renaissance article he mentioned was the subject of significant interest on the far right in 2015.In the two weeks following the murder of nine people at a church in Charleston by the white supremacist Dylann Roof as Americans demanded the removal of Confederate statues and flags, Miller encouraged McHugh to turn the narrative back on leftists and Latinos.“Should the cross be removed from immigrant communities, in light of the history of Spanish conquest?” he asked in one email on 24 June.“When will the left be made to apologize for the blood on their hands supporting every commie regime since Stalin?” he asked in another the following day.When another mass shooting happened in Oregon in October 2015, Miller wrote that the killer, Chris Harper-Mercer “is described as ‘mixed race’ and born in England. Any chance of piecing that profile together more, or will it all be covered up?”Miller repeatedly brings up President Calvin Coolidge, who is revered among white nationalists for signing the 1924 Immigration Act which included racial quotas for immigration.In one email, Miller remarks on a report about the beginning of Immigrant Heritage Month by writing: “This would seem a good opportunity to remind people about the heritage established by Calvin Coolidge, which covers four decades of the 20th century.” The four decades in question is the period between the passage of the Immigration Act and the abolition of racial quotas.Miller also hints at conspiratorial explanations for the maintenance of current immigration policies. Mainstream coverage of the 50th anniversary of the removal of racial quotas in immigration policy had lacked detail, Miller believed, because “Elites can’t allow the people to see that their condition is not the product of events beyond their control, but the product of policy they foisted onto them.”.Miller used a US government email address during the early part of the correspondence, when he was an aide to senator Jeff Sessions, and then announced his new job on the Trump campaign, and a new email address, to recipients including McHugh.As well as McHugh, recipients of his emails included others then at Breitbart who subsequently worked in the Trump administration, including Steve Bannon and current Trump aide, Julia Hahn.


U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commander

U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commanderAt a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the ISIS militants and prevent the extremists from resurging or breaking out of prisons.


Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of Kosovo

Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of KosovoGhana has revoked its "premature" recognition of Kosovo -- a move backed by Serbia, which opposes statehood for the former Yugoslav province. "The government of Ghana has decided to withdraw Ghana’s recognition of Kosovo as an independent state," deputy foreign minister Charles Owiredu told AFP on Tuesday. The reasons were communicated to Serbia in a letter, he said.


Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most Overrated

Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most OverratedHe might be one of President Trump's favorite generals, but as Hampton Sides writes, Douglas MacArthur was far from a military genius.


Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police say

Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police sayAuthorities say Alexis Crawford and her roommate Jordyn Jones had a physical altercation and Jones' boyfriend intervened and choked Crawford to death.


Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII site

Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII siteTour operators and the Japanese ambassador to the Solomons say it appears to be a case of a lack of understanding of the significance of the Alligator Creek site by the new owner. The issue has stirred up debate in the Solomons concerning its new relationship with China, which was formalized in September following the Pacific island nation's decision to sever its diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of Beijing.


Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?

Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?Taipei is worried about China.


Most distant world ever explored gets new name: Arrokoth

Most distant world ever explored gets new name: ArrokothThe most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year's Day, 3 ½ years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us.


Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. Reentry

Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. ReentryRepresentative Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) called on the State Department Monday to ban the bodyguards of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan who assaulted protesters in a 2017 incident in Washington, D.C. from reentering the U.S.In May 2017, members of the Turkish Presidential Protection Department (TPPD), Turkey's equivalent of the Secret Service, attacked pro-Kurdish protesters outside the residence of the Turkish ambassador. The assault, in which protesters and American law-enforcement officials were injured, was captured on video.In a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Cheney requested that "none of the people who were in the United States with President Erdoğan in 2017 and participated in physical attacks on American citizens—including those protesting lawfully, our secret service, our diplomatic service, and our law enforcement officials—will be allowed into the United States again this week.""At least eleven people were injured throughout the day, including law enforcement personnel who every day defend Americans' constitutional rights and physical safety," Cheney wrote.The letter comes in advance of a planned White House visit by Erdogan this Wednesday.TPPD agents have a history of confrontational incidents on U.S. soil. In 2016, TPPD officers attacked journalists at a Brookings Institution event, and in 2011, they attacked U.N. security personnel at U.N. headquarters in New York.Pompeo on Monday said that President Trump will raise the topic of Turkey's recent invasion of Syria in his meeting with Erdogan."We will talk about what transpired there and how we can do our level best collectively to ensure the protection of all of those in Syria, not just the Kurds, but everyone in Syria," Pompeo told cadets at The Citadel after delivering a Veterans Day speech.


Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’

Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’Hezbollah amassed great power even as its fighters died in Syria. But the bold uprising in Lebanon has brought quiet Shiite grumblings into the open.


Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in Britain

Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in BritainSAMUEL CORUMHillary Clinton has said she wishes she could hug Meghan Markle as she accused the mainstream British media of participating in a cycle of abuse against her motivated by racism and sexism.The former first lady and presidential candidate was appearing on BBC radio in Britain to promote a new book she has written with her daughter, Chelsea, about “gutsy” women.Don’t Expect Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Media War to Simmer Down SoonHillary said the abuse she had suffered was “heartbreaking and wrong” and said she was in no doubt there was a racial element to the abuse she has endured since starting a relationship with Harry in 2016 and marrying him in 2018.Meghan and Harry have been outspoken in their criticism of the press: Meghan is suing the Mail on Sunday after alleging the paper unlawfully published a private letter to her father, while the prince is bringing a separate case alleging phone-hacking.Asked to comment on her legal action, Chelsea Clinton said: “We each have to do what we think is the right thing for ourselves and in her case I would imagine for her son… I think absolutely there’s a racist and a sexist element to what’s going on here.” Hillary added that “race was clearly an element” in some of the social-media backlash Meghan had faced since her relationship with the prince began in 2016, and that traditional media had amplified that.  “To think that some of your, what we would call mainstream media, actually allowed that to be printed in their pages, or amplified, was heartbreaking and wrong. “She is an amazing young woman, she has an incredible life story. She has stood up for herself, she has made her own way in the world. And then she falls in love, and he falls in love with her, and everybody should be celebrating that because it is a true love story.“I feel as a mother I just want to put my arms around her. Oh my God, I want to hug her. I want to tell her to hang in there, don’t let those bad guys get you down.”Clinton suggested that Meghan could employ “some humor, some deflection” to better cope with negative attention.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymous

Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymousA Republican lawmaker on Sunday broke with the President Trump and fellow party members to reject the idea that the whistleblower whose complaint prompted an impeachment inquiry into the president should have to testify publicly.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First Amendment

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First AmendmentOcasio-Cortez recently apologized for blocking a critic on Twitter and settled a lawsuit he filed alleging she violated the First Amendment.


Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrants

Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrantsThe Supreme Court appeared likely to side with the Trump administration in its effort to end the DACA program for 660,000 undocumented immigrants.


These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested

These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested


Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)But a larger question looms.


Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible week

Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible weekRepublicans who lead the Wisconsin Assembly voted Tuesday to call the state Capitol evergreen a Christmas tree and formally recognize National Bible Week, moves they said were necessary to ensure Christianity isn't marginalized as the holidays approach. The 64-30 vote on naming the tree was a direct response to Gov. Tony Evers' declaration last week that it would be called a "holiday tree." Evers' Republican predecessor Scott Walker, the son of a Baptist minister, declared the evergreen was a Christmas tree during his first term in 2011. "It seems like the only religion we're willing to take shots at is Christianity," Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke told reporters during a news conference.


Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandal

Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandalTaiwan is seeking the return of hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten funds linked to a controversial deal to buy French frigates over two decades ago, prosecutors said Tuesday. Taiwanese arms dealer Andrew Wang was indicted for corruption in 2006 for reaping hundreds of millions of dollars from the deal, and his family were also found guilty as his accomplices. Wang and his family were put on Taiwan's most wanted list after they fled the island shortly before the scandal broke in 1993.


Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrest

Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrestIraq's top Shi'ite cleric on Monday expressed concern that the political elite is not serious about enacting reforms in the face of mass unrest and said protesters should not go home until concrete steps had been taken to meet their demands. Security forces shot dead two protesters in the city of Nassiriya, bringing to 300 the number of people have been killed since protests against political corruption, unemployment and poor public services erupted in Baghdad on Oct. 1 and spread to the southern Shi'ite heartlands. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, who only speaks on politics in times of crisis and wields enormous influence over public opinion in Shi'ite-majority Iraq, on Monday met Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, the U.N. mission chief in the country.


Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s Market

Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s MarketCourtesy of The Purple Shirt BrigadeThe arrest of an inflatable purple unicorn on Saturday wasn’t even close to the strangest event to unfold at Bloomington, Indiana’s Community Farmers’ Market this year.The market was once the peaceful home of fresh vegetables and goat cheese. But after the owners of a market stall were outed as supporters of a white supremacist group, it has become the center of a fierce debate on bigotry and free speech. The controversy has led to new rules about where people can hold signs and distribute flyers in the market—and on Saturday, five anti-racist protesters were arrested for allegedly breaking those rules.The unicorn was the first to go. Dressed in an inflatable purple pony suit with a golden horn, protester Forrest Gilmore was removed from the market by two police officers, each gripping one of his purple hooves.Gilmore is part of the Purple Shirt Brigade, an activist coalition that formed this year in response to allegations of white supremacists working at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market. Those allegations began after the arrest of Indiana resident Nolan Brewer for spray-painting Nazi flags on the side of a synagogue and setting off a fire outside. Brewer told authorities he was a dues-paying member of the hate group Identity Evropa, and described getting dinner with another member: Sarah Dye and her husband Douglas Mackey. Brewer also told investigators the screenname Dye used in an Identity Evropa chat room. Local activists then matched that name to Dye and a series of racist messages she posted as “Volkmom.” (Dye denies being a white supremacist, but describes herself as an “identitarian,” a term with little to no meaningful distinction from white supremacy, and which has become popular among white supremacists hoping for more mainstream acceptance.)Farmers’ Markets Have New Unwelcome Guests: FascistsActivists also connected Dye to Schooner Creek Farm, the farm she runs with her husband. The two have a stall in the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market, where some local activists began distributing “Don’t Buy Veggies From Nazis” buttons this summer. The group “No Space for Hate” announced plans to protest at the market, prompting counter-protests from right-wing groups like a local “Three Percenter” militia and new rules about where and how people can express themselves in the market. One anti-Schooner Creek protester was arrested for holding a sign in front of the stall.Bloomington officials ruled this summer that Schooner Creek Farm was not breaking any rules, and that Dye and her husband had a First Amendment right to their beliefs. The protests, however, became the subject of new rules. “New signage will clearly indicate areas designated for flyering and expression and publicize market rules,” the city announced in August.On Saturday, the Purple Shirt Brigade tested those rules.“The idea was to find a way to protest directly in the market,” a spokesperson for the group told The Daily Beast. “Most of us had been protesting with No Space for Hate previously (and still are). The market had created rules earlier in the summer to ban the use of signs in the marketplace.”The group pointed to pictures of a number of recent guests with far-right ties at the Schooner Creek farm stand, including Patrick Casey, the leader of Identity Evropa (which rebranded this year as the American Identity Movement). Casey and other group members attended Unite the Right, the deadly 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.‘Whiter Every Election Cycle’: How Identity Evropa, a Far-Right Hate Group, Joined the GOPOnline, the farm stand has also received support from the right. When Dye shared pictures of protesters this summer (“violent Indiana ANTIFA terrorists at our farmers market booth today”), a commenter asked, “why didn’t anyone just shoot them?”Previously, the Purple Shirt Brigade skirted the anti-signage laws by printing their messages on T-shirts. (“Justice is what love looks like in public,” the shirts read, “Boycott Schooner Creek Farm.”) But they’ve pushed the rules in a bid to see exactly what’s allowed.“We have wanted to challenge the signage rule because we believe it's a violation of our First Amendment rights,” the spokesperson said. “One week we brought purple fans to the market (they looked like signs), and the market staff let us get away with that. However, this week we created signs with statements made by SCF supporters about us (from Facebook comments).”Protesters carrying the signs dressed up as unicorns, vikings, and Wonder Woman. Five were arrested on counts of disorderly conduct and trespassing, and issued 24-hour bans from the market area, the Bloomingtonian reported.In a video captured by the Bloomingtonian, the purple-clad protesters sang “no neo-Nazis in the market” while two unicorns argued with a police officer over exactly how they could protest.“So we can’t sing?” one unicorn asked over the sound of a guitar.“Not in here,” the officer responded. He turned to the other unicorn. “Forrest, I need you to leave as well.”Police were filmed writing the unicorn a citation shortly thereafter.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the Law

No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the LawA  video of New York City police officers arresting a woman for selling churros in a subway station in Brooklyn on Friday night went viral over the weekend -- sparking a lot of outrage on her behalf.The incident made headlines after New York City resident Sofia B. Newman tweeted the video, along with an explanation of what she’d seen:> Tonight as I was leaving Broadway Junction, I saw three or four police officers (one of them was either a plainclothes cop or someone who worked at the station) gathered around a crying woman and her churro cart. Apparently, it's illegal to sell food inside train stations. 1/? pic.twitter.com/sgQVvSHUik> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> They were telling her that she could either give them her churro cart and receive a fine (one that she probably wouldn't have been able to afford), or that they would take her cart and arrest her. 2/?> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> She kept trying to speak to one of the cops in Spanish, but the plainclothes cop kept rolling his eyes and saying things like, "Are you done?" and "I know you can speak English." Eventually, they cuffed her and unceremoniously dragged her and her cart away. 3/? pic.twitter.com/qVIfN7DO7u> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019 According to the Associated Press, the NYPD claims that the woman in the video had received a total of ten summonses for “unlicensed vending” within the past six months. After she was handcuffed, it reports, the cops ultimately let her go with a ticket -- but kept her cart as “arrest evidence.”Unfortunately, this week’s criminalization-of-churros news didn’t end there. The New York Daily News reported on Monday that another woman had been arrested in Brooklyn for selling churros that morning, too.Needless to say, these arrests have been the subject of a lot of controversy. The woman who was arrested Friday, who wanted to be identified only as “Elsa,” told reporters (with the help of a translator) on Monday that the officers eventually “became violent” during the incident, and that she had “felt horrible, nervous and stressed” throughout the ordeal. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, on the other hand, insisted that the police had done nothing wrong, that “she was there multiple times and was told multiple times that this [was] not a place you can be and it’s against the law,” that “she shouldn’t have been there,” that what she did was “not acceptable behavior,” and that the NYPD “officers comported themselves properly from what I can see.” The New York Times ran a story with the headline: “A Woman Selling Churros Was Handcuffed. The Police Face a Backlash.” The Daily News did something similar with its piece, “Police accused of ‘overreach’ in arresting churro seller in Brooklyn subway.”Now, I can’t be sure whether or not the NYPD officers actually “became violent” during the incident with Elsa, as she alleges that they did. I certainly didn’t see that in the video footage, but it’s always a possibility that things happened that weren’t captured. What’s more, I also believe that New York City’s police officers could probably find some more worthwhile things to do than arrest people for selling fried sugar-dough.Still, I can’t help but notice that something seems to be missing from the conversation: Why does no one seem to be pissed off about the law that gives the NYPD the power to arrest these women, and those like them, in the first place?Although I would agree that the police shouldn’t be making these sorts of things a priority, we should also take this opportunity to observe how Big Government can hurt the same people that it claims to want to help. Think about it: Liberal politicians often push for stricter government regulation of businesses and then, in the same breath, claim that they’re the party of the “little guy,” of the disadvantaged and the struggling. Here, we see that that isn’t always the case. Here, what the “little guy” needs most from the government is to do less, so that she can do more for herself.The truth is, stories like this week’s War on Churros serve as evidence against the common misconception that a limited-government philosophy amounts to cold-heartedness, to a cruel disregard (or even outright hatred) for those in this country who are struggling. The truth is, sometimes the best way for the government to help those in need is to stop itself from “helping” them at all.If you have a problem with women being handcuffed for trying to make a living selling pastries, then good; we agree. So, join me in calling for the law to be changed -- so that people can be free to carve out their own living, without fear of arrest, in the country that’s supposed to stand for that exact thing.


13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance Rates

13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance RatesThe U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: Colleges, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.


Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for trips

Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for tripsBurisma gave more than $450,000 to the Atlantic Council, a prominent Washington think tank.


PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rain

PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rainTourists and Venetians alike have donned high boots and taken to temporary raised walkways to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city.


Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian Reaction

Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian ReactionLeah Millis/ReutersUnder Mick Mulvaney’s leadership, the Office of Management and Budget temporarily put a hold on the delivery of anti-tank missiles to Ukraine in 2017 because of concerns their arrival would upset Russia, according to former White House official Catherine Croft. She described OMB’s objection as “highly unusual.”Croft’s testimony indicates that concerns about the U.S. relationship with Russia had a direct—though short-lived—impact on U.S./Ukraine policy in the first year of Trump’s presidency.Croft told congressional impeachment investigators that after the Trump administration greenlit the delivery of Javelin missiles to Ukraine in late 2017—the first delivery of lethal aid to the country since Russian separatists seized territory in its Eastern region in 2014—Mulvaney’s office held it up. “Did you understand why?” asked the congressional staffer questioning her. “I understood the reason to be a policy one,” she replied. “What was the policy one?” “In a briefing with Mick Mulvaney, the question centered around the Russian reaction,” she continued. “What was the concern about the Russian reaction?” asked the staffer. “That Russia would react negatively to the provision of Javelins to Ukraine,” she said. The Daily Beast first reported last month that OMB held up the 2017 shipment of Javelins to Ukraine. Croft said the hold lasted “about a week or two,” and that “all of the policy agencies” wanted the aid to go to Ukraine. She said OMB’s interest in the decision about whether to send Javelins to Ukraine was abnormal. Key Impeachment Witnesses Finger Mulvaney In the Quid Pro Quo“[It] was rather unusual to have OMB expressing concerns that were purely policy-based and not budget-oriented,” she said. “At the beginning of the Ukrainian Javelin process, I had been told that OMB was taking a policy interest,” she continued. “And OMB began sending working level officials to attend meetings... which was very unusual at the time.” She noted that OMB staff also started attending meetings regarding aid to countries besides Ukraine and that the increase in their involvement was “quite taxing on a very small organization.”Mulvaney and several other OMB officials have refused to participate in the congressional impeachment inquiry. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurtPirates attacked an Italy-flagged offshore supply vessel in the southern Gulf of Mexico, injuring two crew members, the Mexican Navy said on Tuesday, in the latest outbreak of robbery and piracy to hit oil platforms and infrastructure in the area. Owned by Italian offshore contractor Micoperi, the boat is a supply vessel for Mexico's oil industry. Micoperi and the Italian embassy in Mexico did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergarten

51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergartenMore than 50 people, mostly children, were injured by a man who broke into a kindergarten in southwest China and sprayed them with corrosive liquid, local authorities said Tuesday. The suspect, a 23-year-old surnamed Kong, entered the kindergarten by climbing a wall before spraying victims with sodium hydroxide, said local authorities in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province. The attack took place on Monday at 3:35 pm (0735 GMT), authorities said on their Twitter-like Weibo account.


Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estate

Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estateA woman who confronted Jeffrey Epstein at a July bail hearing to tell a judge he touched her inappropriately when she was 16 sued his estate Tuesday, alleging he had subjected her to sex trafficking as part of his attacks on young women and girls. Lawyers for Annie Farmer filed the lawsuit in Manhattan federal court, along with a lawsuit on behalf of her sister, Maria Farmer, and Teresa Helm, an Ohio woman. A lawyer for Epstein's estate did not return a message seeking comment.


Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia commentsTulsi Gabbard's lawyers want Hillary Clinton to make her retraction at a press conference and on social media.


How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?

How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?Though Germany eventually lost World War II and France again ended up on the victorious side, the leadership traits demonstrated before and during the battle in 1940 are textbook examples of what makes for great leadership—and what kind of leadership leads to defeat.


Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearing

Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearingA Connecticut man charged in the death of a hotel worker he says attacked his family in Anguilla has declined to return to the British Caribbean territory for the latest pretrial hearing, a spokesman said Monday. Scott Hapgood, of Darien, is worried about his safety in light of death threats, and Anguilla officials have not provided assurances that he would be allowed to return home on bond after the hearing, family spokesman Jamie Diaferia said. Anguilla officials rejected an offer for Hapgood to appear by video link for Monday's hearing, Diaferia said.


Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’

Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice said Monday that reports detailing the involvement of President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in the White House’s Ukraine policy were “deeply troubling.”“What I see right now troubles me. I see a state of conflict between the foreign policy professionals and someone who says he’s acting on behalf of the president but frankly I don’t know if that is the case,” Rice said at a conference in Abu Dhabi. “This is just not a good thing. The world shouldn’t get confusing messages from the United States of America.”Multiple witnesses have alleged in house testimony that Giuliani conducted his own investigative work without regard for the administration’s formal policy.William Taylor, the former top American diplomat in Ukraine, whose testimony was released last week, asserted that Giuliani was actively undermining U.S. foreign policy.“The irregular channel seemed to focus on specific issues, specific cases, rather than the regular channel’s focus on institution building,” Taylor said, according to the transcript. “So the irregular channel, I think under the influence of Mr. Giuliani, wanted to focus on one or two specific cases, irrespective of whether it helped solve the corruption problem, fight the corruption problem.”Earlier Monday, news broke that Lev Parnas, an associate of Giuliani, will tell investigators that Giuliani attempted to leverage an official visit from Vice President Mike Pence to coax Ukraine into announcing an investigation into Joe Biden's son Hunter's business connections to Burisma.Rice also said she thought Trump’s mention of former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma, during the call was “out of bounds.”“The call is murky, it is really murky. I don’t like for the president of the United States to mention an American citizen for investigation to a foreign leader,” Rice said.


Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020

Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020Hillary Clinton on Tuesday declined to rule out launching a future presidential campaign after her two failed bids, saying “many, many, many people” were pressuring her to enter the race.


Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight

Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight(Bloomberg) -- Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has done his best to keep a low profile in the 13 months since one of the most polarizing Senate confirmation fights in U.S. history.From the bench, his questions have been evenhanded and his opinions have been measured. His public appearances have been rare.But Kavanaugh will be back in the spotlight when he gives the featured dinner speech on Thursday at the annual Washington convention of the Federalist Society, the powerful conservative legal group that helped put him on the court.The appearance, in front of an organization Kavanaugh joined in 1988 as a law student, will offer a reminder of his professional roots and help showcase the group’s success in helping load the federal courts with conservative judges -- one of President Donald Trump’s signature achievements.It will also provide a fresh indication of how the Supreme Court’s most controversial justice will navigate the raw feelings that remain after his nomination by Trump and narrow Senate confirmation in the face of sexual assault allegations.About 2,300 people are expected to attend the Antonin Scalia Memorial Dinner, a black-tie-optional event that brings legal luminaries to the cavernous Main Hall of Washington’s Union Station every year. The event will be open to the media, though broadcast coverage will be prohibited.When many Americans last saw Kavanaugh, he was at his Senate confirmation hearing angrily and tearfully denying that he had assaulted Christine Blasey Ford decades ago when both were teenagers.“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election,” Kavanaugh said, with rage that would later be lampooned by actor Matt Damon on “Saturday Night Live.”He was confirmed on a 50-48 vote.‘Gracious’ JusticeThat Brett Kavanaugh bears little resemblance to the one who now sits at one end of the Supreme Court bench, seen only by the few hundred people who typically attend its camera-free argument sessions.Kavanaugh tends to politely challenge both sides during arguments, almost always without tipping his hand on his own views. He often chats amicably with Justice Elena Kagan, who sits to his right and seems to have far more to discuss with him than with Justice Samuel Alito on her other side.“He seems quite comfortable,” said Carter Phillips, a veteran Supreme Court lawyer at Sidley Austin. “He’s very gracious, extremely well-prepared. His questions are good.”Kavanaugh’s written opinions have generally been measured. Though he has almost always voted with his conservative colleagues when the court splits along ideological lines, he has eschewed the sweeping rhetoric of Trump’s other Supreme Court appointee, Neil Gorsuch. On occasion, Kavanaugh has written separate opinions to describe his position as a limited one.“He appears more cautious and pragmatic than Gorsuch, but it’s too early to tell too much,” said Jonathan Adler, a professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.Kavanaugh’s colleagues have publicly welcomed him and said they don’t harbor any ill feelings.“We are all human beings, we all have pasts,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor told a judicial conference in September, according to the Wall Street Journal. “Now whether things occurred or didn’t occur, all of that is irrelevant.”Female ClerksJustice Ruth Bader Ginsburg praised Kavanaugh for hiring four women to serve as his law clerks for his first term, something no justice had done in any term.That decision is as close as Kavanaugh has come to publicly addressing the confirmation controversy since he joined the court.“It was all women, and I think that was not coincidental,” said Melissa Murray, a New York University law professor who testified during the confirmation hearing that she was concerned Kavanaugh would vote to overturn abortion rights. “I think it was intended to be a rebuttal to those who believe those allegations, took those allegations seriously. I think he wanted to sort of counteract the perception that might have been left after the confirmation hearing.”For the public at large, Kavanaugh remains a polarizing figure -- far more so than his longer-serving colleagues. A Marquette Law School poll conducted in September found that 32% of respondents had an unfavorable view of Kavanaugh, with 26% holding a favorable view. No other justice had an unfavorable rating higher than 23%.Though he has met privately with smaller groups, the Federalist Society speech will mark only the second time Kavanaugh has spoken publicly outside the court since the White House ceremony that followed his October 2018 confirmation. Kavanaugh appeared in May with the man he succeeded, Justice Anthony Kennedy, before a conference of judges and lawyers.Standing OvationKavanaugh’s reception at the Federalist Society event is all but certain to be positive, probably overwhelmingly so, though it’s possible he’ll face protests.“I expect he’ll get a very warm reception,” said Adler, a Federalist Society member who plans to attend.Kavanaugh got a lengthy standing ovation when he arrived for last year’s dinner, which took place less than six weeks after the Senate vote. He opted not to give a talk at that event, instead agreeing to speak this year, according to two people familiar with the planning.The Federalist Society’s executive vice president, Leonard Leo, has served as a key adviser to Trump on judicial nominations. Leo declined to be interviewed about Kavanaugh’s work on the court, saying he generally doesn’t comment on individual justices.The dinner is part of a three-day program that features speeches by Gorsuch and Attorney General Bill Barr as well as panel discussions on a plethora of legal topics.“I think it is meaningful that he’s choosing to make a debut of sorts at this particular venue,” Murray said.Chances are Kavanaugh’s speech will steer clear of any discussion of the confirmation controversy. He probably will at least touch on the judicial philosophy that made him a Federalist Society favorite in the first place. He might show the side of himself that promised at his confirmation hearing to be part of a “team of nine” on the court.“I think it will be different than it was in his last public appearance,” said Phillips with a laugh. “He is by nature a gracious and even-tempered person. I expect that that’s the way he will come across.”To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay bar

Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay barA Ugandan court charged 67 people with causing a nuisance on Tuesday after they were arrested in a gay-friendly bar, in a move condemned by activists as the latest "homophobic" attack. The 67 - who were among 127 arrested at Ram Bar, in the capital, Kampala, on Sunday - could face up to one year in jail if found guilty, said Patricia Kimera, a lawyer for the group. "This is just a homophobic attack," LGBT+ activist Raymond Karuhanga told the Thomson Reuters Foundation outside the court.


See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel


With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil War

With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarA traffic police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed 21-year-old pro-democracy protester at point-blank range on Monday. Hours later, a man was set on fire after defending Beijing in an argument. Both individuals were listed in critical condition.Over the weekend, wide-scale disturbances scarred the territory, a semi-autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China. There is essentially a rebellion in Hong Kong. Riot police in green uniforms are doing battle with youthful demonstrators dressed in black. How Hong Kong Protesters Show Which Businesses Are Friend or FoeProtests began in April after Chief Executive Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s top official, proposed legislation authorizing the extradition of fugitives to various jurisdictions, including Mainland China. Starting June 9, when an estimated one million Hong Kongers marched in the streets, demonstrations have been almost continuous. Lam has since permanently withdrawn the extradition bill from consideration, but the protests have not abated. Especially this week. Hong Kong braced for a weekend of disturbances after Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died on Friday after falling from a car park the preceding Sunday while running away from police tear gas. Many have accused the police of delaying medical assistance to the mortally injured Chow.Chow has been called “the first fatality linked to police action during a protest,” but many believe the police have killed others. Demonstrators believe three of their number were beaten to death on August 31 in the Prince Edward Mass Transit Railway station in Mong Kok. Since then, the above-ground entrance to the station has become a shrine, protestors have repeatedly rallied in front of the adjacent Mong Kok police station, and youth have continually trashed MTR trains and stations because they believe management of the rail system has withheld surveillance-camera footage.Even a single death creates a cycle of revenge and retaliation that is almost impossible to control. Chow’s passing sparked a weekend of rage.Moreover, Chief Executive Lam added to the tensions. In her most recent press conference, held Monday after the shooting and burning incidents, she called protesters the “enemy of the people.” Her provocative Cultural Revolution-speak comment came on the heels of her November 4 meeting with Chinese ruler Xi Jinping. China is apparently controlling events, and either out of obliviousness or maliciousness, it is making the situation worse. Beijing has been doing that by forcing Lam to take a hard line. Apart from the withdrawal of the extradition bill—doomed because the normally pro-Beijing business community came out against it early on—she has been intransigent. That intransigence was evident from her Monday remarks. She said she would not yield to violence, but she had previously left Hong Kong people no choice. She had, with her stubbornness, earlier foreclosed the possibility of peaceful change.Hong Kong people may not be able to change her mind, but she cannot change theirs either. The army in black—as well as many other people in the territory—have continued to protest.Analysts say Beijing will eventually lose patience and use force. “This kind of extreme, violent, and destructive activity would not be tolerated or accepted in any country or society in the world nowadays,” said Chinese Vice-Premier Han Zheng as he met with Lam early this month in Beijing.Han’s words were taken as a threat to formally deploy units of the People’s Liberation Army or the People’s Armed Police to the streets of Hong Kong to “crush” the protests and reestablish order. Beijing could move in troops, but the move is unlikely to work. Hong Kong, after all, is ideal territory for defenders, like guerilla fighters supported by an overwhelming portion of the public. Every apartment building there is a fort where hostiles can rain down explosives or petrol bombs on Chinese troops and then disappear into their homes or back alleys. Xi Jinping surely does not want his first war to take tens of thousands of soldiers, last years if not decades, and end in a loss for China.In the meantime, there is credible evidence suggesting Mainland Chinese personnel—troops or police—are now operating on Hong Kong streets in police uniforms. This sly tactic is not working, however. Why not? The Hong Kong police department, once considered the most professional force of its kind in Asia, has lost discipline, something evident from the shooting of the protester Monday and countless other incidents. The breakdown in discipline roughly coincides with early evidence that Chinese forces were mixed in with the Hong Kong police, and the resulting rough tactics have resulted in a loss of support of ordinary residents tired of being tear gassed, clubbed, and manhandled. All this raises the question whether Beijing has given the green light to police officers to act as brutally as they want. Yet whether China did so or not, harsh action by the police is sustaining support for the protesters. Demonstrators this past weekend were chanting “Revenge.” Hong Kong is now at war with itself. There is no end in sight to the fighting.LeBron James Bends the Knee to China, Fails His First Big Test as the NBA’s ConscienceRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack Obama

Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack ObamaPete Buttigieg got in hot water with many loyal Democrats on Sunday when the Los Angeles Times reported that he cited the "failures of the Obama era" as part of why Trump's election happened. This inspired furious outrage from liberal partisans and party apparatchiks -- only soothed (and tweets deleted) when the reporter said he had misquoted Buttigieg, who was then quick to lavish praise on the ex-president.But as it turns out, Buttigieg previously said almost the exact same thing in a recent interview with Showtime's The Circus. "I don't think there's going back to Obama... the American political world we've been in from the day I was born, has been blown up," he explained, "[thanks to] its own failures which culminated in Trump. Look, if the old way worked, something like Trump would never have been possible."So this recent flap sure looks like another flip-flop from Payola Pete, mayor of Indiana's fourth largest city. But at least in his beta release form, I have to admit that Buttigieg was completely correct. Democrats really need to get over this worshipful reverence of Barack Obama.For one thing, it is simply beyond question that the Obama years were a political disaster. From having commanding majorities in both the House and the Senate, Democrats lost first the former, then the latter, and finally the presidency, as the candidate running as Obama's successor bobbled perhaps the easiest lay-up election in American history. Meanwhile, the party all but collapsed in many states, as devastating national defeats translated into the loss of over 1,000 state legislative seats.As I have written before, the primary reason for the Obama-era Democrats' initial crushing loss in 2010, which locked in Republican gains for a decade at least through their ensuing control of the state gerrymandering process, was policy error -- undershooting the size of the economic stimulus in response to the Great Recession on the one hand, and secretly using homeowner assistance money to bail out the banks on the other. The former was not entirely Obama's fault, as he had to get congressional approval for the stimulus, but the latter was entirely under his control. Millions were left out of work, and about 10 million people losing their homes wreaked further economic devastation. As any historian could tell you, being in power during a huge economic disaster is the surest possible way to get blown out of the water in the next election.If you take Obama out of the equation, what Buttigieg was saying before it looks like folks might stop sending those fat campaign checks is all but conventional wisdom even among liberals. Obama himself reportedly has grave doubts about what Trump means for his legacy. Clearly if the party could lose to the most unpopular major party nominee in the history of polling, whatever was happening before 2016 was not exactly working out.And from the other side of the fence, Obama has shown no inclination to fulfill the sort of leadership role loyal Democrats clearly crave. Despite the shattering national crisis that Trump presents, he has not gone on to a different office -- unlike, say, John Quincy Adams, who returned to the House after his presidency and fought slavery literally until his dying breath. Obama is not out there mobilizing day and night against Trump's migrant concentration camps, or his Muslim ban, or his blatant abuses of power.Only occasionally will Obama pop up to endorse candidates, often centrist or center-right white men like Emmanuel Macron or Justin Trudeau. He largely avoided campaigning in 2018 until the last few weeks before the election. He's mainly keeping to himself, hanging out with rich tycoons and celebrities, and making eye-popping sums giving paid speeches before big corporations and banks.He appears in public only occasionally -- and when he does, he has a tendency to indulge in get-off-my-lawn youth scolding that, as Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote back in 2013, was offensive and out of date when he did it as president. "This idea of purity and you're never compromised and you're always politically 'woke' and all that stuff," he said at a recent Obama Foundation summit. "You should get over that quickly. The world is messy, there are ambiguities." Just like the time when "we tortured some folks," but it was still important to "look forward as opposed to backwards" instead of enforcing the law, I suppose.Jokes aside, this almost beggars belief. President Trump is flagrantly stealing money from the American state, attempting to get foreign countries to gin up political persecutions of Obama's own vice president, and Obama is out here raising worries about exaggerated nonsense from America's most dimwitted and gullible columnists, and earning praise from loathsome trolls:> Good for Obama. (Not sarcastic!) https://t.co/cwq5mcDc7V> > -- Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) October 30, 2019Now, let me be clear: All this is, of course, Obama's complete right as a private citizen. It is, at least for the moment, still a free country. But Democrats should not follow the advice of the Washington Post's Jennifer Rubin, who argues that "it is unheard of for a party following a two-term president not to run on his achievements," in part because "Republicans did that with former president Ronald Reagan for 30 years." She would know, from her previous incarnation as a prolific and absolutely shameless propagandist for Mitt Romney. But the grim fate of the GOP is precisely the problem.We see today what you get when a party loses the ability to think critically about its history, and treats its leaders as infallible saints no matter what they do: Donald Trump.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)

America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)Russia and China have their own plans.


Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viral

Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viralA substitute teacher has been fired and charged with aggravated assault following the beating of a 15-year-old female high school student in an incident captured on video. Tiffani Shadell Lankford is free on $10,000 bond after her arrest Friday afternoon. Video of last week's incident in a foreign-language class at Lehman High School in Kyle, Texas, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Austin went viral.


Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet Altan

Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet AltanTurkish police acting on a court order rearrested journalist and novelist Ahmet Altan Tuesday, just a week after his release from prison over alleged links to the failed 2016 coup. Altan and another veteran journalist Nazli Ilicak were released on November 4 despite having been convicted of "helping a terrorist group". The Istanbul court sentenced Altan to more than 10 years in jail, but ruled that he and Ilicak should be released under supervision after time already served -- around three years each.


Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales

Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales* Ex-president’s party refuses to recognise senator’s claim * Morales says army told him of $50,000 price on his headJeanine Añez waves from the balcony of the Quemado Palace in La Paz after claiming Bolivia’s interim presidency. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Bolivian senator Jeanine Añez has declared herself the country’s interim president after the resignation of Evo Morales, even though lawmakers from his party boycotted the legislative session where she assumed office.Añez, 52, took temporary control of the Senate late on Tuesday. “I will take the measures necessary to pacify the country,” she said, swearing on a bible to loud cheers and applause. The move is expected to pave the way for fresh elections.Morales’s Movement Towards Socialism called the session illegal and its legislators refused to take part. Nearby hundreds of Morales supporters marched against Añez assuming the role. “She’s declared herself president without having a quorum in the parliament,” Julio Chipana told the Guardian. “She doesn’t represent us.”Morales, who resigned under pressure from police and the army after a fiercely disputed election, has flown into exile in Mexico, leaving a confused power vacuum behind in Bolivia. Speaking at a hastily organised press conference on the tarmac, the former president thanked Mexico for “saving my life” and repeated his accusation that his rivals had forced him out in a coup.He said that before his resignation on Sunday a member of the army had showed him messages putting a $50,000 price on his head.“I thought we had finished with the discrimination and the humiliation, but new groups have emerged that have no respect for life, let alone for the fatherland,” Morales said. “It’s another lesson to learn.”Morales, 60, was greeted with a handshake, a hug and a pat on the cheek from Mexico’s foreign minister, Marcelo Ebrard, after the flight in a Mexican army plane from the Bolivian city of Cochabamba.He defended his time in government and said that if he were guilty any crime, it was to be indigenous and “anti-imperalist”.Morales was accompanied by his former vice-president, Álvaro García Linera, who has been his closest political collaborator since before he became Bolivia’s first indigenous president in modern times.“García Linera and I have always been committed to the idea that peace can only come with social justice,” Morales said. “This coup is not going to change our ideology.”Though he promised that this was not the end of his political career, the Bolivian leader gave no indication of his immediate plans.Morales left behind a country close to chaos as supporters and opponents clashed on the streets, amid reports of fresh looting, vandalism and arson after the October election, which the Organisation of American States found to have been rigged in his favour.On Tuesday much of Bolivia’s main city, La Paz, was like a ghost town after police warned inhabitants to stay indoors. Roadblocks were thrown up across the city as the political uncertainty continued and residents feared more violent clashes.The country remained in political limbo as senators and deputies loyal to the former leader appeared to refuse to endorse the new interim president, deputy senate leader Jeanine Áñez.“The people who have been in all these protests want us to call presidential elections which are not fraudulent, which are trustworthy,” Áñez, a political opponent of Morales, told journalists in the national assembly building.Shirley Franco, an opposition member of parliament, said: “What Bolivians want in this moment of crisis is certainty and we, the maximum authorities in this country, must work to re-establish democracy.”Manning a makeshift barricade a few blocks away, anti-Morales protester Danella Ormachea, 29, said: “We want this to end. We need a new interim president to call new elections so there is democracy and our vote is respected. That’s all we ask.”Martín Cornejo Choque, a rural leader in La Paz province, denied there had been voter fraud.“Before the election, the right said if Evo Morales wins we won’t recognise it. The opposition just don’t want to recognise the votes of the rural areas,” he said.Cornejo, who led dozens of communities to La Paz’s San Francisco square in support of Morales, said Morales had transformed life for rural Bolivians.“Before when there were rightwing, neoliberal presidents they never cared about the peasant farmer. We lived in extreme poverty,” said Cornejo. “Our roads were not paved, we didn’t even have bridges but today, thanks to this government, all the peasant communities have development.”Morales’s sudden departure was a dramatic fall for the former coca growers’ union leader who swept to power 14 years ago in a historic election.He went on to win two more landslide victories and lifted millions out of poverty, but Morales’s popularity began to wane in 2016, when he ignored a referendum in which voters said he could not run for a fourth term.Mass protests broke out after last month’s election following an unexplained 24-hour halt in the voting which fuelled accusations of electoral fraud.Áñez denied that Morales had been the victim of a coup, saying: “What happened in Bolivia was the verification of monumental fraud. A coup d’etat is when there are soldiers in the streets.”Neighbouring countries’ responses to the ousting of Morales have reflected the ideological divisions of a continent where populism on the right and the left has been on the rise once again.Those backing Morales included Venezuela’s embattled leader Nicolás Maduro, Nicaragua’s seemingly eternal president Daniel Ortega, and Cuba’s Miguel Díaz-Canel.This camp also includes Brazil’s former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who blamed it on Latin America’s “economic elite”, and Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández, who said it returned the region to “the bad days of the 70s”.Brazil’s current far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, has been the loudest voice against Morales. “The left uses the word ‘coup’ a lot when it loses, right?” he told O Globo.Other regional leaders have avoided the subject – most notably Chile’s conservative president, Sebastián Piñera, who is clinging to power in the face of a wave of social unrest. His government issued a statement calling for a peaceful and democratic solution. Similar statements have come out of Peru and Colombia.Beyond the region, Donald Trump said that Morales’s resignation “preserves democracy”, while in the UK the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn condemned the “coup against the Bolivian people”.Oliver Stuenkel, an international relations professor at Fundação Getúlio Vargas University in São Paulo, said that describing what happened in Bolivia as a coup did not necessarily imply that Morales had respected democratic norms.“In fact, non-democratic governments are often overthrown through non-democratic means, precisely because they cannot easily be voted out of office,” he tweeted.Meanwhile, Mexico’s very public offer of asylum – which was made before Morales had even asked for it – has prompted some critics of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to accuse him of seeking a distraction from the country’s own security crisis.On Tuesday, Ebrard insisted it fell squarely within a long tradition in which Mexico has provided safety for persecuted political leaders, from Leon Trotsky to activists who fled Argentina and Chile during the military dictatorships of the 70s and 80s.“This is a tradition we should be proud of and continue,” Ebrard said on Tuesday.


A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China

A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China


Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secrets

Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secretsA Chinese national pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing trade secrets from U.S. petroleum company Phillips 66 , where he worked on the research and development of next generation battery technologies, the U.S. Justice Department said. Hongjin Tan, 36, stole information regarding the manufacture of a "research and development downstream energy market product" that is worth more than $1 billion, the department said in a statement. The department identified the company where he worked as Phillips 66 in court documents filed in Oklahoma.


Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPA

Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPAThe mercury rule has protected Americans from dangerous pollution. Changing it threatens gains that include cleaner air and edible seafood.


Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's why

Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's whyWhy aren't more credibly accused Catholic priests in prison? Blame it on laws that don't allow enough time for abuse survivors to come forward


A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eating

A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eatingBay Area Rapid Transit police said Steve Foster, of Concord, California, violated state law by eating a sandwich on a BART station's platform.


Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in Syria

Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in SyriaA defense industry source told Russian news outlet Izvestia last month that the S-500 recently underwent field testing in Syria, where the Russian Aerospace Forces continue to maintain a significant presence. Moscow denied it--but won't dey what they think this air defense platform could do in battle.


Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptopsA federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry. ACLU attorney Esha Bhandari said the ruling strengthens the Fourth Amendment protections of international travelers who enter the United States every year.


Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech

Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech(Bloomberg) -- Former Brazil President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gave a strong speech on Saturday to a crowd of supporters gathered in front of a metalworkers union headquarters outside the city of Sao Paulo. He criticized the Carwash corruption probe and the market-friendly agenda that is being implemented by President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration and Economy Minister Paulo Guedes’ team. Bolsonaro and his ministers struck back, while military army representatives worry about the risk of violence, according to the local newspapers.Criticism of Guedes“I doubt that the dream-destroying minister, the job-destroyer, the destroyer of Brazilian public companies called Guedes, sleeps with a clear conscience,” Lula said in a speech on Saturday. At the same time, Lula said that Bolsonaro was democratically elected and that the result must be accepted.Lula’s TravelsLula has pledged to travel around Brazil and Latin America, offering support for leftist leaders at a moment when the region is engulfed by growing political turmoil. Lula is expected to start his tour in the Northeast of Brazil, this Sunday, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Bolsonaro’s ReplyBolsonaro broke his silence about Lula’s release and wrote that he will not respond to “criminals who are now free,” via Twitter. Bolsonaro also met top military officials on Saturday morning to assess the outlook after the former president’s release, according to Estado.Military Concern Among the military, there is concern that Lula’s speech may incite violence, according to Estado. According to Folha de S.Paulo, the army fears the risk of radicalization between Bolsonaro and Lula’s supporters, but considers that both were reasonably reserved in their initial comments.CounterattackGuedes’s team is preparing for ways to counter Lula’s speeches. The ministry is betting on the argument that the economy is gaining steam, and that the government has released money, such as the FGTS funds, without cutting benefits, according to Folha. Bolsonaro also endorsed Justice Minister Sergio Moro’s reaction to Lula, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Moro has become a key player in Bolsonaro’s strategy of confronting Lula. The president himself accused Lula of causing the stock market drop on Friday:Agenda Keeps Advancing The government is set to launch a package to encourage the hiring of young and old people. The pension reform may be enacted on Tuesday, while the Senate is expected to complete the first round vote a constitutional amendment to include states and municipalities in the pension reform. The government is expected send a proposal for public administration reform to the lower house. Congress also looks set to speed up debate about jail time for convicts, following last week’s Supreme Court decision.ObstructionBrazil parties pledge to obstruct other agenda items in order to discuss imprisonment. Podemos and Novo parties will obstruct the lower house’s plenary and committees until a constitutional amendment proposal dealing with the rule on imprisonment after first appeal is voted on. Moro also defended the amendment.Bolsonaro about BoliviaLula and Bolsonaro’s reactions to the crisis in Bolivia reflect the growing polarization in Brazil. While Lula called it a “coup,” Bolsonaro said the word “coup” is only used when the left loses, according to O Globo.Other highlightsBolsonaro has sold 91 billion reais in assets of Banco do Brasil, Petrobras and Caixa: Folha de S.PauloGovernment arranges meetings with international oil companies: Valor EconomicoInfrastructure studies fusion between three state-owned transport area: Valor EconomicoNewspaper Top StoriesO Estado de S. Paulo, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo Newspapers highlight Evo Morales’ resignation in BoliviaValor EconomicoReports that only 6% of cities meet basic sanitation goalsTo contact the translation editor responsible for this story: Matthew Malinowski at mmalinowski@bloomberg.netReporter on the original story: Fernando Travaglini in in São Paulo at ftravaglini@bloomberg.netEditors responsible for the original story: Daniela Milanese at dmilanese@bloomberg.net, Josue LeonelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation reveals

Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation revealsEmails to former Breitbart writer show Miller focused on inserting white nationalist talking points to shape 2016 election coverageStephen Miller, senior adviser to Donald Trump, walks across the South Lawn of the White House on 4 November. Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPASenior Trump adviser Stephen Miller shaped the 2016 election coverage of the hard right-wing website Breitbart with material drawn from prominent white nationalists, Islamophobes, and far-right websites, according to a new investigative report by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).Miller also railed against those wishing to remove Confederate monuments and flags from public display in the wake of Dylann Roof’s murderous 2015 attack on a black church in Charleston, South Carolina, and praised America’s early 20th-century race-based, restrictionist immigration policies.Emails from Miller to a former Breitbart writer, sent before and after he joined the Trump campaign, show Miller obsessively focused on injecting white nationalist-style talking points on race and crime, Confederate monuments, and Islam into the far-right website’s campaign coverage, the SPLC report says.Miller, one of the few surviving initial appointees in the administration, has been credited with orchestrating Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies.The SPLC story is based largely on emails provided by a former Breitbart writer, Katie McHugh. McHugh was fired by Breitbart over a series of anti-Muslim tweets and has since renounced the far right, telling the SPLC that the movement is “evil”.However, throughout 2015 and 2016, as the Trump campaign progressed and she became an increasingly influential voice at Breitbart, McHugh told the SPLC that Miller urged her in a steady drumbeat of emails and phone calls to promote arguments from sources popular with far-right and white nationalist movements.Miller’s emails had a “strikingly narrow” focus on race and immigration, according to the SPLC report.At various times, the SPLC reports, Miller recommendations for McHugh included the white nationalist website, VDare; Camp of the Saints, a racist novel focused on a “replacement” of European whites by mass third-world immigration; conspiracy site Infowars; and Refugee Resettlement Watch, a fringe anti-immigrant site whose tagline is “They are changing America by changing the people”.McHugh also says that in a phone call, Miller suggested that she promote an analysis of race and crime featured on the website of a white nationalist organization, American Renaissance. The American Renaissance article he mentioned was the subject of significant interest on the far right in 2015.In the two weeks following the murder of nine people at a church in Charleston by the white supremacist Dylann Roof as Americans demanded the removal of Confederate statues and flags, Miller encouraged McHugh to turn the narrative back on leftists and Latinos.“Should the cross be removed from immigrant communities, in light of the history of Spanish conquest?” he asked in one email on 24 June.“When will the left be made to apologize for the blood on their hands supporting every commie regime since Stalin?” he asked in another the following day.When another mass shooting happened in Oregon in October 2015, Miller wrote that the killer, Chris Harper-Mercer “is described as ‘mixed race’ and born in England. Any chance of piecing that profile together more, or will it all be covered up?”Miller repeatedly brings up President Calvin Coolidge, who is revered among white nationalists for signing the 1924 Immigration Act which included racial quotas for immigration.In one email, Miller remarks on a report about the beginning of Immigrant Heritage Month by writing: “This would seem a good opportunity to remind people about the heritage established by Calvin Coolidge, which covers four decades of the 20th century.” The four decades in question is the period between the passage of the Immigration Act and the abolition of racial quotas.Miller also hints at conspiratorial explanations for the maintenance of current immigration policies. Mainstream coverage of the 50th anniversary of the removal of racial quotas in immigration policy had lacked detail, Miller believed, because “Elites can’t allow the people to see that their condition is not the product of events beyond their control, but the product of policy they foisted onto them.”.Miller used a US government email address during the early part of the correspondence, when he was an aide to senator Jeff Sessions, and then announced his new job on the Trump campaign, and a new email address, to recipients including McHugh.As well as McHugh, recipients of his emails included others then at Breitbart who subsequently worked in the Trump administration, including Steve Bannon and current Trump aide, Julia Hahn.


U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commander

U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commanderAt a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the ISIS militants and prevent the extremists from resurging or breaking out of prisons.


Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of Kosovo

Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of KosovoGhana has revoked its "premature" recognition of Kosovo -- a move backed by Serbia, which opposes statehood for the former Yugoslav province. "The government of Ghana has decided to withdraw Ghana’s recognition of Kosovo as an independent state," deputy foreign minister Charles Owiredu told AFP on Tuesday. The reasons were communicated to Serbia in a letter, he said.


Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most Overrated

Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most OverratedHe might be one of President Trump's favorite generals, but as Hampton Sides writes, Douglas MacArthur was far from a military genius.


Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police say

Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police sayAuthorities say Alexis Crawford and her roommate Jordyn Jones had a physical altercation and Jones' boyfriend intervened and choked Crawford to death.


Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII site

Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII siteTour operators and the Japanese ambassador to the Solomons say it appears to be a case of a lack of understanding of the significance of the Alligator Creek site by the new owner. The issue has stirred up debate in the Solomons concerning its new relationship with China, which was formalized in September following the Pacific island nation's decision to sever its diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of Beijing.


Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?

Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?Taipei is worried about China.


Most distant world ever explored gets new name: Arrokoth

Most distant world ever explored gets new name: ArrokothThe most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year's Day, 3 ½ years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us.


Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. Reentry

Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. ReentryRepresentative Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) called on the State Department Monday to ban the bodyguards of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan who assaulted protesters in a 2017 incident in Washington, D.C. from reentering the U.S.In May 2017, members of the Turkish Presidential Protection Department (TPPD), Turkey's equivalent of the Secret Service, attacked pro-Kurdish protesters outside the residence of the Turkish ambassador. The assault, in which protesters and American law-enforcement officials were injured, was captured on video.In a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Cheney requested that "none of the people who were in the United States with President Erdoğan in 2017 and participated in physical attacks on American citizens—including those protesting lawfully, our secret service, our diplomatic service, and our law enforcement officials—will be allowed into the United States again this week.""At least eleven people were injured throughout the day, including law enforcement personnel who every day defend Americans' constitutional rights and physical safety," Cheney wrote.The letter comes in advance of a planned White House visit by Erdogan this Wednesday.TPPD agents have a history of confrontational incidents on U.S. soil. In 2016, TPPD officers attacked journalists at a Brookings Institution event, and in 2011, they attacked U.N. security personnel at U.N. headquarters in New York.Pompeo on Monday said that President Trump will raise the topic of Turkey's recent invasion of Syria in his meeting with Erdogan."We will talk about what transpired there and how we can do our level best collectively to ensure the protection of all of those in Syria, not just the Kurds, but everyone in Syria," Pompeo told cadets at The Citadel after delivering a Veterans Day speech.


Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’

Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’Hezbollah amassed great power even as its fighters died in Syria. But the bold uprising in Lebanon has brought quiet Shiite grumblings into the open.


Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in Britain

Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in BritainSAMUEL CORUMHillary Clinton has said she wishes she could hug Meghan Markle as she accused the mainstream British media of participating in a cycle of abuse against her motivated by racism and sexism.The former first lady and presidential candidate was appearing on BBC radio in Britain to promote a new book she has written with her daughter, Chelsea, about “gutsy” women.Don’t Expect Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Media War to Simmer Down SoonHillary said the abuse she had suffered was “heartbreaking and wrong” and said she was in no doubt there was a racial element to the abuse she has endured since starting a relationship with Harry in 2016 and marrying him in 2018.Meghan and Harry have been outspoken in their criticism of the press: Meghan is suing the Mail on Sunday after alleging the paper unlawfully published a private letter to her father, while the prince is bringing a separate case alleging phone-hacking.Asked to comment on her legal action, Chelsea Clinton said: “We each have to do what we think is the right thing for ourselves and in her case I would imagine for her son… I think absolutely there’s a racist and a sexist element to what’s going on here.” Hillary added that “race was clearly an element” in some of the social-media backlash Meghan had faced since her relationship with the prince began in 2016, and that traditional media had amplified that.  “To think that some of your, what we would call mainstream media, actually allowed that to be printed in their pages, or amplified, was heartbreaking and wrong. “She is an amazing young woman, she has an incredible life story. She has stood up for herself, she has made her own way in the world. And then she falls in love, and he falls in love with her, and everybody should be celebrating that because it is a true love story.“I feel as a mother I just want to put my arms around her. Oh my God, I want to hug her. I want to tell her to hang in there, don’t let those bad guys get you down.”Clinton suggested that Meghan could employ “some humor, some deflection” to better cope with negative attention.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymous

Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymousA Republican lawmaker on Sunday broke with the President Trump and fellow party members to reject the idea that the whistleblower whose complaint prompted an impeachment inquiry into the president should have to testify publicly.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First Amendment

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First AmendmentOcasio-Cortez recently apologized for blocking a critic on Twitter and settled a lawsuit he filed alleging she violated the First Amendment.


Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrants

Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrantsThe Supreme Court appeared likely to side with the Trump administration in its effort to end the DACA program for 660,000 undocumented immigrants.


These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested

These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested


Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)But a larger question looms.


Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible week

Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible weekRepublicans who lead the Wisconsin Assembly voted Tuesday to call the state Capitol evergreen a Christmas tree and formally recognize National Bible Week, moves they said were necessary to ensure Christianity isn't marginalized as the holidays approach. The 64-30 vote on naming the tree was a direct response to Gov. Tony Evers' declaration last week that it would be called a "holiday tree." Evers' Republican predecessor Scott Walker, the son of a Baptist minister, declared the evergreen was a Christmas tree during his first term in 2011. "It seems like the only religion we're willing to take shots at is Christianity," Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke told reporters during a news conference.


Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandal

Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandalTaiwan is seeking the return of hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten funds linked to a controversial deal to buy French frigates over two decades ago, prosecutors said Tuesday. Taiwanese arms dealer Andrew Wang was indicted for corruption in 2006 for reaping hundreds of millions of dollars from the deal, and his family were also found guilty as his accomplices. Wang and his family were put on Taiwan's most wanted list after they fled the island shortly before the scandal broke in 1993.


Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrest

Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrestIraq's top Shi'ite cleric on Monday expressed concern that the political elite is not serious about enacting reforms in the face of mass unrest and said protesters should not go home until concrete steps had been taken to meet their demands. Security forces shot dead two protesters in the city of Nassiriya, bringing to 300 the number of people have been killed since protests against political corruption, unemployment and poor public services erupted in Baghdad on Oct. 1 and spread to the southern Shi'ite heartlands. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, who only speaks on politics in times of crisis and wields enormous influence over public opinion in Shi'ite-majority Iraq, on Monday met Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, the U.N. mission chief in the country.


Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s Market

Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s MarketCourtesy of The Purple Shirt BrigadeThe arrest of an inflatable purple unicorn on Saturday wasn’t even close to the strangest event to unfold at Bloomington, Indiana’s Community Farmers’ Market this year.The market was once the peaceful home of fresh vegetables and goat cheese. But after the owners of a market stall were outed as supporters of a white supremacist group, it has become the center of a fierce debate on bigotry and free speech. The controversy has led to new rules about where people can hold signs and distribute flyers in the market—and on Saturday, five anti-racist protesters were arrested for allegedly breaking those rules.The unicorn was the first to go. Dressed in an inflatable purple pony suit with a golden horn, protester Forrest Gilmore was removed from the market by two police officers, each gripping one of his purple hooves.Gilmore is part of the Purple Shirt Brigade, an activist coalition that formed this year in response to allegations of white supremacists working at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market. Those allegations began after the arrest of Indiana resident Nolan Brewer for spray-painting Nazi flags on the side of a synagogue and setting off a fire outside. Brewer told authorities he was a dues-paying member of the hate group Identity Evropa, and described getting dinner with another member: Sarah Dye and her husband Douglas Mackey. Brewer also told investigators the screenname Dye used in an Identity Evropa chat room. Local activists then matched that name to Dye and a series of racist messages she posted as “Volkmom.” (Dye denies being a white supremacist, but describes herself as an “identitarian,” a term with little to no meaningful distinction from white supremacy, and which has become popular among white supremacists hoping for more mainstream acceptance.)Farmers’ Markets Have New Unwelcome Guests: FascistsActivists also connected Dye to Schooner Creek Farm, the farm she runs with her husband. The two have a stall in the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market, where some local activists began distributing “Don’t Buy Veggies From Nazis” buttons this summer. The group “No Space for Hate” announced plans to protest at the market, prompting counter-protests from right-wing groups like a local “Three Percenter” militia and new rules about where and how people can express themselves in the market. One anti-Schooner Creek protester was arrested for holding a sign in front of the stall.Bloomington officials ruled this summer that Schooner Creek Farm was not breaking any rules, and that Dye and her husband had a First Amendment right to their beliefs. The protests, however, became the subject of new rules. “New signage will clearly indicate areas designated for flyering and expression and publicize market rules,” the city announced in August.On Saturday, the Purple Shirt Brigade tested those rules.“The idea was to find a way to protest directly in the market,” a spokesperson for the group told The Daily Beast. “Most of us had been protesting with No Space for Hate previously (and still are). The market had created rules earlier in the summer to ban the use of signs in the marketplace.”The group pointed to pictures of a number of recent guests with far-right ties at the Schooner Creek farm stand, including Patrick Casey, the leader of Identity Evropa (which rebranded this year as the American Identity Movement). Casey and other group members attended Unite the Right, the deadly 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.‘Whiter Every Election Cycle’: How Identity Evropa, a Far-Right Hate Group, Joined the GOPOnline, the farm stand has also received support from the right. When Dye shared pictures of protesters this summer (“violent Indiana ANTIFA terrorists at our farmers market booth today”), a commenter asked, “why didn’t anyone just shoot them?”Previously, the Purple Shirt Brigade skirted the anti-signage laws by printing their messages on T-shirts. (“Justice is what love looks like in public,” the shirts read, “Boycott Schooner Creek Farm.”) But they’ve pushed the rules in a bid to see exactly what’s allowed.“We have wanted to challenge the signage rule because we believe it's a violation of our First Amendment rights,” the spokesperson said. “One week we brought purple fans to the market (they looked like signs), and the market staff let us get away with that. However, this week we created signs with statements made by SCF supporters about us (from Facebook comments).”Protesters carrying the signs dressed up as unicorns, vikings, and Wonder Woman. Five were arrested on counts of disorderly conduct and trespassing, and issued 24-hour bans from the market area, the Bloomingtonian reported.In a video captured by the Bloomingtonian, the purple-clad protesters sang “no neo-Nazis in the market” while two unicorns argued with a police officer over exactly how they could protest.“So we can’t sing?” one unicorn asked over the sound of a guitar.“Not in here,” the officer responded. He turned to the other unicorn. “Forrest, I need you to leave as well.”Police were filmed writing the unicorn a citation shortly thereafter.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the Law

No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the LawA  video of New York City police officers arresting a woman for selling churros in a subway station in Brooklyn on Friday night went viral over the weekend -- sparking a lot of outrage on her behalf.The incident made headlines after New York City resident Sofia B. Newman tweeted the video, along with an explanation of what she’d seen:> Tonight as I was leaving Broadway Junction, I saw three or four police officers (one of them was either a plainclothes cop or someone who worked at the station) gathered around a crying woman and her churro cart. Apparently, it's illegal to sell food inside train stations. 1/? pic.twitter.com/sgQVvSHUik> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> They were telling her that she could either give them her churro cart and receive a fine (one that she probably wouldn't have been able to afford), or that they would take her cart and arrest her. 2/?> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> She kept trying to speak to one of the cops in Spanish, but the plainclothes cop kept rolling his eyes and saying things like, "Are you done?" and "I know you can speak English." Eventually, they cuffed her and unceremoniously dragged her and her cart away. 3/? pic.twitter.com/qVIfN7DO7u> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019 According to the Associated Press, the NYPD claims that the woman in the video had received a total of ten summonses for “unlicensed vending” within the past six months. After she was handcuffed, it reports, the cops ultimately let her go with a ticket -- but kept her cart as “arrest evidence.”Unfortunately, this week’s criminalization-of-churros news didn’t end there. The New York Daily News reported on Monday that another woman had been arrested in Brooklyn for selling churros that morning, too.Needless to say, these arrests have been the subject of a lot of controversy. The woman who was arrested Friday, who wanted to be identified only as “Elsa,” told reporters (with the help of a translator) on Monday that the officers eventually “became violent” during the incident, and that she had “felt horrible, nervous and stressed” throughout the ordeal. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, on the other hand, insisted that the police had done nothing wrong, that “she was there multiple times and was told multiple times that this [was] not a place you can be and it’s against the law,” that “she shouldn’t have been there,” that what she did was “not acceptable behavior,” and that the NYPD “officers comported themselves properly from what I can see.” The New York Times ran a story with the headline: “A Woman Selling Churros Was Handcuffed. The Police Face a Backlash.” The Daily News did something similar with its piece, “Police accused of ‘overreach’ in arresting churro seller in Brooklyn subway.”Now, I can’t be sure whether or not the NYPD officers actually “became violent” during the incident with Elsa, as she alleges that they did. I certainly didn’t see that in the video footage, but it’s always a possibility that things happened that weren’t captured. What’s more, I also believe that New York City’s police officers could probably find some more worthwhile things to do than arrest people for selling fried sugar-dough.Still, I can’t help but notice that something seems to be missing from the conversation: Why does no one seem to be pissed off about the law that gives the NYPD the power to arrest these women, and those like them, in the first place?Although I would agree that the police shouldn’t be making these sorts of things a priority, we should also take this opportunity to observe how Big Government can hurt the same people that it claims to want to help. Think about it: Liberal politicians often push for stricter government regulation of businesses and then, in the same breath, claim that they’re the party of the “little guy,” of the disadvantaged and the struggling. Here, we see that that isn’t always the case. Here, what the “little guy” needs most from the government is to do less, so that she can do more for herself.The truth is, stories like this week’s War on Churros serve as evidence against the common misconception that a limited-government philosophy amounts to cold-heartedness, to a cruel disregard (or even outright hatred) for those in this country who are struggling. The truth is, sometimes the best way for the government to help those in need is to stop itself from “helping” them at all.If you have a problem with women being handcuffed for trying to make a living selling pastries, then good; we agree. So, join me in calling for the law to be changed -- so that people can be free to carve out their own living, without fear of arrest, in the country that’s supposed to stand for that exact thing.


13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance Rates

13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance RatesThe U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: Colleges, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.


Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for trips

Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for tripsBurisma gave more than $450,000 to the Atlantic Council, a prominent Washington think tank.


PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rain

PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rainTourists and Venetians alike have donned high boots and taken to temporary raised walkways to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city.


Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian Reaction

Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian ReactionLeah Millis/ReutersUnder Mick Mulvaney’s leadership, the Office of Management and Budget temporarily put a hold on the delivery of anti-tank missiles to Ukraine in 2017 because of concerns their arrival would upset Russia, according to former White House official Catherine Croft. She described OMB’s objection as “highly unusual.”Croft’s testimony indicates that concerns about the U.S. relationship with Russia had a direct—though short-lived—impact on U.S./Ukraine policy in the first year of Trump’s presidency.Croft told congressional impeachment investigators that after the Trump administration greenlit the delivery of Javelin missiles to Ukraine in late 2017—the first delivery of lethal aid to the country since Russian separatists seized territory in its Eastern region in 2014—Mulvaney’s office held it up. “Did you understand why?” asked the congressional staffer questioning her. “I understood the reason to be a policy one,” she replied. “What was the policy one?” “In a briefing with Mick Mulvaney, the question centered around the Russian reaction,” she continued. “What was the concern about the Russian reaction?” asked the staffer. “That Russia would react negatively to the provision of Javelins to Ukraine,” she said. The Daily Beast first reported last month that OMB held up the 2017 shipment of Javelins to Ukraine. Croft said the hold lasted “about a week or two,” and that “all of the policy agencies” wanted the aid to go to Ukraine. She said OMB’s interest in the decision about whether to send Javelins to Ukraine was abnormal. Key Impeachment Witnesses Finger Mulvaney In the Quid Pro Quo“[It] was rather unusual to have OMB expressing concerns that were purely policy-based and not budget-oriented,” she said. “At the beginning of the Ukrainian Javelin process, I had been told that OMB was taking a policy interest,” she continued. “And OMB began sending working level officials to attend meetings... which was very unusual at the time.” She noted that OMB staff also started attending meetings regarding aid to countries besides Ukraine and that the increase in their involvement was “quite taxing on a very small organization.”Mulvaney and several other OMB officials have refused to participate in the congressional impeachment inquiry. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurtPirates attacked an Italy-flagged offshore supply vessel in the southern Gulf of Mexico, injuring two crew members, the Mexican Navy said on Tuesday, in the latest outbreak of robbery and piracy to hit oil platforms and infrastructure in the area. Owned by Italian offshore contractor Micoperi, the boat is a supply vessel for Mexico's oil industry. Micoperi and the Italian embassy in Mexico did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergarten

51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergartenMore than 50 people, mostly children, were injured by a man who broke into a kindergarten in southwest China and sprayed them with corrosive liquid, local authorities said Tuesday. The suspect, a 23-year-old surnamed Kong, entered the kindergarten by climbing a wall before spraying victims with sodium hydroxide, said local authorities in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province. The attack took place on Monday at 3:35 pm (0735 GMT), authorities said on their Twitter-like Weibo account.


Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estate

Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estateA woman who confronted Jeffrey Epstein at a July bail hearing to tell a judge he touched her inappropriately when she was 16 sued his estate Tuesday, alleging he had subjected her to sex trafficking as part of his attacks on young women and girls. Lawyers for Annie Farmer filed the lawsuit in Manhattan federal court, along with a lawsuit on behalf of her sister, Maria Farmer, and Teresa Helm, an Ohio woman. A lawyer for Epstein's estate did not return a message seeking comment.


Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia commentsTulsi Gabbard's lawyers want Hillary Clinton to make her retraction at a press conference and on social media.


How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?

How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?Though Germany eventually lost World War II and France again ended up on the victorious side, the leadership traits demonstrated before and during the battle in 1940 are textbook examples of what makes for great leadership—and what kind of leadership leads to defeat.


Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearing

Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearingA Connecticut man charged in the death of a hotel worker he says attacked his family in Anguilla has declined to return to the British Caribbean territory for the latest pretrial hearing, a spokesman said Monday. Scott Hapgood, of Darien, is worried about his safety in light of death threats, and Anguilla officials have not provided assurances that he would be allowed to return home on bond after the hearing, family spokesman Jamie Diaferia said. Anguilla officials rejected an offer for Hapgood to appear by video link for Monday's hearing, Diaferia said.


Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’

Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice said Monday that reports detailing the involvement of President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in the White House’s Ukraine policy were “deeply troubling.”“What I see right now troubles me. I see a state of conflict between the foreign policy professionals and someone who says he’s acting on behalf of the president but frankly I don’t know if that is the case,” Rice said at a conference in Abu Dhabi. “This is just not a good thing. The world shouldn’t get confusing messages from the United States of America.”Multiple witnesses have alleged in house testimony that Giuliani conducted his own investigative work without regard for the administration’s formal policy.William Taylor, the former top American diplomat in Ukraine, whose testimony was released last week, asserted that Giuliani was actively undermining U.S. foreign policy.“The irregular channel seemed to focus on specific issues, specific cases, rather than the regular channel’s focus on institution building,” Taylor said, according to the transcript. “So the irregular channel, I think under the influence of Mr. Giuliani, wanted to focus on one or two specific cases, irrespective of whether it helped solve the corruption problem, fight the corruption problem.”Earlier Monday, news broke that Lev Parnas, an associate of Giuliani, will tell investigators that Giuliani attempted to leverage an official visit from Vice President Mike Pence to coax Ukraine into announcing an investigation into Joe Biden's son Hunter's business connections to Burisma.Rice also said she thought Trump’s mention of former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma, during the call was “out of bounds.”“The call is murky, it is really murky. I don’t like for the president of the United States to mention an American citizen for investigation to a foreign leader,” Rice said.


Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020

Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020Hillary Clinton on Tuesday declined to rule out launching a future presidential campaign after her two failed bids, saying “many, many, many people” were pressuring her to enter the race.


Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight

Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight(Bloomberg) -- Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has done his best to keep a low profile in the 13 months since one of the most polarizing Senate confirmation fights in U.S. history.From the bench, his questions have been evenhanded and his opinions have been measured. His public appearances have been rare.But Kavanaugh will be back in the spotlight when he gives the featured dinner speech on Thursday at the annual Washington convention of the Federalist Society, the powerful conservative legal group that helped put him on the court.The appearance, in front of an organization Kavanaugh joined in 1988 as a law student, will offer a reminder of his professional roots and help showcase the group’s success in helping load the federal courts with conservative judges -- one of President Donald Trump’s signature achievements.It will also provide a fresh indication of how the Supreme Court’s most controversial justice will navigate the raw feelings that remain after his nomination by Trump and narrow Senate confirmation in the face of sexual assault allegations.About 2,300 people are expected to attend the Antonin Scalia Memorial Dinner, a black-tie-optional event that brings legal luminaries to the cavernous Main Hall of Washington’s Union Station every year. The event will be open to the media, though broadcast coverage will be prohibited.When many Americans last saw Kavanaugh, he was at his Senate confirmation hearing angrily and tearfully denying that he had assaulted Christine Blasey Ford decades ago when both were teenagers.“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election,” Kavanaugh said, with rage that would later be lampooned by actor Matt Damon on “Saturday Night Live.”He was confirmed on a 50-48 vote.‘Gracious’ JusticeThat Brett Kavanaugh bears little resemblance to the one who now sits at one end of the Supreme Court bench, seen only by the few hundred people who typically attend its camera-free argument sessions.Kavanaugh tends to politely challenge both sides during arguments, almost always without tipping his hand on his own views. He often chats amicably with Justice Elena Kagan, who sits to his right and seems to have far more to discuss with him than with Justice Samuel Alito on her other side.“He seems quite comfortable,” said Carter Phillips, a veteran Supreme Court lawyer at Sidley Austin. “He’s very gracious, extremely well-prepared. His questions are good.”Kavanaugh’s written opinions have generally been measured. Though he has almost always voted with his conservative colleagues when the court splits along ideological lines, he has eschewed the sweeping rhetoric of Trump’s other Supreme Court appointee, Neil Gorsuch. On occasion, Kavanaugh has written separate opinions to describe his position as a limited one.“He appears more cautious and pragmatic than Gorsuch, but it’s too early to tell too much,” said Jonathan Adler, a professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.Kavanaugh’s colleagues have publicly welcomed him and said they don’t harbor any ill feelings.“We are all human beings, we all have pasts,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor told a judicial conference in September, according to the Wall Street Journal. “Now whether things occurred or didn’t occur, all of that is irrelevant.”Female ClerksJustice Ruth Bader Ginsburg praised Kavanaugh for hiring four women to serve as his law clerks for his first term, something no justice had done in any term.That decision is as close as Kavanaugh has come to publicly addressing the confirmation controversy since he joined the court.“It was all women, and I think that was not coincidental,” said Melissa Murray, a New York University law professor who testified during the confirmation hearing that she was concerned Kavanaugh would vote to overturn abortion rights. “I think it was intended to be a rebuttal to those who believe those allegations, took those allegations seriously. I think he wanted to sort of counteract the perception that might have been left after the confirmation hearing.”For the public at large, Kavanaugh remains a polarizing figure -- far more so than his longer-serving colleagues. A Marquette Law School poll conducted in September found that 32% of respondents had an unfavorable view of Kavanaugh, with 26% holding a favorable view. No other justice had an unfavorable rating higher than 23%.Though he has met privately with smaller groups, the Federalist Society speech will mark only the second time Kavanaugh has spoken publicly outside the court since the White House ceremony that followed his October 2018 confirmation. Kavanaugh appeared in May with the man he succeeded, Justice Anthony Kennedy, before a conference of judges and lawyers.Standing OvationKavanaugh’s reception at the Federalist Society event is all but certain to be positive, probably overwhelmingly so, though it’s possible he’ll face protests.“I expect he’ll get a very warm reception,” said Adler, a Federalist Society member who plans to attend.Kavanaugh got a lengthy standing ovation when he arrived for last year’s dinner, which took place less than six weeks after the Senate vote. He opted not to give a talk at that event, instead agreeing to speak this year, according to two people familiar with the planning.The Federalist Society’s executive vice president, Leonard Leo, has served as a key adviser to Trump on judicial nominations. Leo declined to be interviewed about Kavanaugh’s work on the court, saying he generally doesn’t comment on individual justices.The dinner is part of a three-day program that features speeches by Gorsuch and Attorney General Bill Barr as well as panel discussions on a plethora of legal topics.“I think it is meaningful that he’s choosing to make a debut of sorts at this particular venue,” Murray said.Chances are Kavanaugh’s speech will steer clear of any discussion of the confirmation controversy. He probably will at least touch on the judicial philosophy that made him a Federalist Society favorite in the first place. He might show the side of himself that promised at his confirmation hearing to be part of a “team of nine” on the court.“I think it will be different than it was in his last public appearance,” said Phillips with a laugh. “He is by nature a gracious and even-tempered person. I expect that that’s the way he will come across.”To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay bar

Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay barA Ugandan court charged 67 people with causing a nuisance on Tuesday after they were arrested in a gay-friendly bar, in a move condemned by activists as the latest "homophobic" attack. The 67 - who were among 127 arrested at Ram Bar, in the capital, Kampala, on Sunday - could face up to one year in jail if found guilty, said Patricia Kimera, a lawyer for the group. "This is just a homophobic attack," LGBT+ activist Raymond Karuhanga told the Thomson Reuters Foundation outside the court.


See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel


With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil War

With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarA traffic police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed 21-year-old pro-democracy protester at point-blank range on Monday. Hours later, a man was set on fire after defending Beijing in an argument. Both individuals were listed in critical condition.Over the weekend, wide-scale disturbances scarred the territory, a semi-autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China. There is essentially a rebellion in Hong Kong. Riot police in green uniforms are doing battle with youthful demonstrators dressed in black. How Hong Kong Protesters Show Which Businesses Are Friend or FoeProtests began in April after Chief Executive Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s top official, proposed legislation authorizing the extradition of fugitives to various jurisdictions, including Mainland China. Starting June 9, when an estimated one million Hong Kongers marched in the streets, demonstrations have been almost continuous. Lam has since permanently withdrawn the extradition bill from consideration, but the protests have not abated. Especially this week. Hong Kong braced for a weekend of disturbances after Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died on Friday after falling from a car park the preceding Sunday while running away from police tear gas. Many have accused the police of delaying medical assistance to the mortally injured Chow.Chow has been called “the first fatality linked to police action during a protest,” but many believe the police have killed others. Demonstrators believe three of their number were beaten to death on August 31 in the Prince Edward Mass Transit Railway station in Mong Kok. Since then, the above-ground entrance to the station has become a shrine, protestors have repeatedly rallied in front of the adjacent Mong Kok police station, and youth have continually trashed MTR trains and stations because they believe management of the rail system has withheld surveillance-camera footage.Even a single death creates a cycle of revenge and retaliation that is almost impossible to control. Chow’s passing sparked a weekend of rage.Moreover, Chief Executive Lam added to the tensions. In her most recent press conference, held Monday after the shooting and burning incidents, she called protesters the “enemy of the people.” Her provocative Cultural Revolution-speak comment came on the heels of her November 4 meeting with Chinese ruler Xi Jinping. China is apparently controlling events, and either out of obliviousness or maliciousness, it is making the situation worse. Beijing has been doing that by forcing Lam to take a hard line. Apart from the withdrawal of the extradition bill—doomed because the normally pro-Beijing business community came out against it early on—she has been intransigent. That intransigence was evident from her Monday remarks. She said she would not yield to violence, but she had previously left Hong Kong people no choice. She had, with her stubbornness, earlier foreclosed the possibility of peaceful change.Hong Kong people may not be able to change her mind, but she cannot change theirs either. The army in black—as well as many other people in the territory—have continued to protest.Analysts say Beijing will eventually lose patience and use force. “This kind of extreme, violent, and destructive activity would not be tolerated or accepted in any country or society in the world nowadays,” said Chinese Vice-Premier Han Zheng as he met with Lam early this month in Beijing.Han’s words were taken as a threat to formally deploy units of the People’s Liberation Army or the People’s Armed Police to the streets of Hong Kong to “crush” the protests and reestablish order. Beijing could move in troops, but the move is unlikely to work. Hong Kong, after all, is ideal territory for defenders, like guerilla fighters supported by an overwhelming portion of the public. Every apartment building there is a fort where hostiles can rain down explosives or petrol bombs on Chinese troops and then disappear into their homes or back alleys. Xi Jinping surely does not want his first war to take tens of thousands of soldiers, last years if not decades, and end in a loss for China.In the meantime, there is credible evidence suggesting Mainland Chinese personnel—troops or police—are now operating on Hong Kong streets in police uniforms. This sly tactic is not working, however. Why not? The Hong Kong police department, once considered the most professional force of its kind in Asia, has lost discipline, something evident from the shooting of the protester Monday and countless other incidents. The breakdown in discipline roughly coincides with early evidence that Chinese forces were mixed in with the Hong Kong police, and the resulting rough tactics have resulted in a loss of support of ordinary residents tired of being tear gassed, clubbed, and manhandled. All this raises the question whether Beijing has given the green light to police officers to act as brutally as they want. Yet whether China did so or not, harsh action by the police is sustaining support for the protesters. Demonstrators this past weekend were chanting “Revenge.” Hong Kong is now at war with itself. There is no end in sight to the fighting.LeBron James Bends the Knee to China, Fails His First Big Test as the NBA’s ConscienceRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack Obama

Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack ObamaPete Buttigieg got in hot water with many loyal Democrats on Sunday when the Los Angeles Times reported that he cited the "failures of the Obama era" as part of why Trump's election happened. This inspired furious outrage from liberal partisans and party apparatchiks -- only soothed (and tweets deleted) when the reporter said he had misquoted Buttigieg, who was then quick to lavish praise on the ex-president.But as it turns out, Buttigieg previously said almost the exact same thing in a recent interview with Showtime's The Circus. "I don't think there's going back to Obama... the American political world we've been in from the day I was born, has been blown up," he explained, "[thanks to] its own failures which culminated in Trump. Look, if the old way worked, something like Trump would never have been possible."So this recent flap sure looks like another flip-flop from Payola Pete, mayor of Indiana's fourth largest city. But at least in his beta release form, I have to admit that Buttigieg was completely correct. Democrats really need to get over this worshipful reverence of Barack Obama.For one thing, it is simply beyond question that the Obama years were a political disaster. From having commanding majorities in both the House and the Senate, Democrats lost first the former, then the latter, and finally the presidency, as the candidate running as Obama's successor bobbled perhaps the easiest lay-up election in American history. Meanwhile, the party all but collapsed in many states, as devastating national defeats translated into the loss of over 1,000 state legislative seats.As I have written before, the primary reason for the Obama-era Democrats' initial crushing loss in 2010, which locked in Republican gains for a decade at least through their ensuing control of the state gerrymandering process, was policy error -- undershooting the size of the economic stimulus in response to the Great Recession on the one hand, and secretly using homeowner assistance money to bail out the banks on the other. The former was not entirely Obama's fault, as he had to get congressional approval for the stimulus, but the latter was entirely under his control. Millions were left out of work, and about 10 million people losing their homes wreaked further economic devastation. As any historian could tell you, being in power during a huge economic disaster is the surest possible way to get blown out of the water in the next election.If you take Obama out of the equation, what Buttigieg was saying before it looks like folks might stop sending those fat campaign checks is all but conventional wisdom even among liberals. Obama himself reportedly has grave doubts about what Trump means for his legacy. Clearly if the party could lose to the most unpopular major party nominee in the history of polling, whatever was happening before 2016 was not exactly working out.And from the other side of the fence, Obama has shown no inclination to fulfill the sort of leadership role loyal Democrats clearly crave. Despite the shattering national crisis that Trump presents, he has not gone on to a different office -- unlike, say, John Quincy Adams, who returned to the House after his presidency and fought slavery literally until his dying breath. Obama is not out there mobilizing day and night against Trump's migrant concentration camps, or his Muslim ban, or his blatant abuses of power.Only occasionally will Obama pop up to endorse candidates, often centrist or center-right white men like Emmanuel Macron or Justin Trudeau. He largely avoided campaigning in 2018 until the last few weeks before the election. He's mainly keeping to himself, hanging out with rich tycoons and celebrities, and making eye-popping sums giving paid speeches before big corporations and banks.He appears in public only occasionally -- and when he does, he has a tendency to indulge in get-off-my-lawn youth scolding that, as Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote back in 2013, was offensive and out of date when he did it as president. "This idea of purity and you're never compromised and you're always politically 'woke' and all that stuff," he said at a recent Obama Foundation summit. "You should get over that quickly. The world is messy, there are ambiguities." Just like the time when "we tortured some folks," but it was still important to "look forward as opposed to backwards" instead of enforcing the law, I suppose.Jokes aside, this almost beggars belief. President Trump is flagrantly stealing money from the American state, attempting to get foreign countries to gin up political persecutions of Obama's own vice president, and Obama is out here raising worries about exaggerated nonsense from America's most dimwitted and gullible columnists, and earning praise from loathsome trolls:> Good for Obama. (Not sarcastic!) https://t.co/cwq5mcDc7V> > -- Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) October 30, 2019Now, let me be clear: All this is, of course, Obama's complete right as a private citizen. It is, at least for the moment, still a free country. But Democrats should not follow the advice of the Washington Post's Jennifer Rubin, who argues that "it is unheard of for a party following a two-term president not to run on his achievements," in part because "Republicans did that with former president Ronald Reagan for 30 years." She would know, from her previous incarnation as a prolific and absolutely shameless propagandist for Mitt Romney. But the grim fate of the GOP is precisely the problem.We see today what you get when a party loses the ability to think critically about its history, and treats its leaders as infallible saints no matter what they do: Donald Trump.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)

America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)Russia and China have their own plans.


Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viral

Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viralA substitute teacher has been fired and charged with aggravated assault following the beating of a 15-year-old female high school student in an incident captured on video. Tiffani Shadell Lankford is free on $10,000 bond after her arrest Friday afternoon. Video of last week's incident in a foreign-language class at Lehman High School in Kyle, Texas, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Austin went viral.


Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet Altan

Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet AltanTurkish police acting on a court order rearrested journalist and novelist Ahmet Altan Tuesday, just a week after his release from prison over alleged links to the failed 2016 coup. Altan and another veteran journalist Nazli Ilicak were released on November 4 despite having been convicted of "helping a terrorist group". The Istanbul court sentenced Altan to more than 10 years in jail, but ruled that he and Ilicak should be released under supervision after time already served -- around three years each.


Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales

Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales* Ex-president’s party refuses to recognise senator’s claim * Morales says army told him of $50,000 price on his headJeanine Añez waves from the balcony of the Quemado Palace in La Paz after claiming Bolivia’s interim presidency. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Bolivian senator Jeanine Añez has declared herself the country’s interim president after the resignation of Evo Morales, even though lawmakers from his party boycotted the legislative session where she assumed office.Añez, 52, took temporary control of the Senate late on Tuesday. “I will take the measures necessary to pacify the country,” she said, swearing on a bible to loud cheers and applause. The move is expected to pave the way for fresh elections.Morales’s Movement Towards Socialism called the session illegal and its legislators refused to take part. Nearby hundreds of Morales supporters marched against Añez assuming the role. “She’s declared herself president without having a quorum in the parliament,” Julio Chipana told the Guardian. “She doesn’t represent us.”Morales, who resigned under pressure from police and the army after a fiercely disputed election, has flown into exile in Mexico, leaving a confused power vacuum behind in Bolivia. Speaking at a hastily organised press conference on the tarmac, the former president thanked Mexico for “saving my life” and repeated his accusation that his rivals had forced him out in a coup.He said that before his resignation on Sunday a member of the army had showed him messages putting a $50,000 price on his head.“I thought we had finished with the discrimination and the humiliation, but new groups have emerged that have no respect for life, let alone for the fatherland,” Morales said. “It’s another lesson to learn.”Morales, 60, was greeted with a handshake, a hug and a pat on the cheek from Mexico’s foreign minister, Marcelo Ebrard, after the flight in a Mexican army plane from the Bolivian city of Cochabamba.He defended his time in government and said that if he were guilty any crime, it was to be indigenous and “anti-imperalist”.Morales was accompanied by his former vice-president, Álvaro García Linera, who has been his closest political collaborator since before he became Bolivia’s first indigenous president in modern times.“García Linera and I have always been committed to the idea that peace can only come with social justice,” Morales said. “This coup is not going to change our ideology.”Though he promised that this was not the end of his political career, the Bolivian leader gave no indication of his immediate plans.Morales left behind a country close to chaos as supporters and opponents clashed on the streets, amid reports of fresh looting, vandalism and arson after the October election, which the Organisation of American States found to have been rigged in his favour.On Tuesday much of Bolivia’s main city, La Paz, was like a ghost town after police warned inhabitants to stay indoors. Roadblocks were thrown up across the city as the political uncertainty continued and residents feared more violent clashes.The country remained in political limbo as senators and deputies loyal to the former leader appeared to refuse to endorse the new interim president, deputy senate leader Jeanine Áñez.“The people who have been in all these protests want us to call presidential elections which are not fraudulent, which are trustworthy,” Áñez, a political opponent of Morales, told journalists in the national assembly building.Shirley Franco, an opposition member of parliament, said: “What Bolivians want in this moment of crisis is certainty and we, the maximum authorities in this country, must work to re-establish democracy.”Manning a makeshift barricade a few blocks away, anti-Morales protester Danella Ormachea, 29, said: “We want this to end. We need a new interim president to call new elections so there is democracy and our vote is respected. That’s all we ask.”Martín Cornejo Choque, a rural leader in La Paz province, denied there had been voter fraud.“Before the election, the right said if Evo Morales wins we won’t recognise it. The opposition just don’t want to recognise the votes of the rural areas,” he said.Cornejo, who led dozens of communities to La Paz’s San Francisco square in support of Morales, said Morales had transformed life for rural Bolivians.“Before when there were rightwing, neoliberal presidents they never cared about the peasant farmer. We lived in extreme poverty,” said Cornejo. “Our roads were not paved, we didn’t even have bridges but today, thanks to this government, all the peasant communities have development.”Morales’s sudden departure was a dramatic fall for the former coca growers’ union leader who swept to power 14 years ago in a historic election.He went on to win two more landslide victories and lifted millions out of poverty, but Morales’s popularity began to wane in 2016, when he ignored a referendum in which voters said he could not run for a fourth term.Mass protests broke out after last month’s election following an unexplained 24-hour halt in the voting which fuelled accusations of electoral fraud.Áñez denied that Morales had been the victim of a coup, saying: “What happened in Bolivia was the verification of monumental fraud. A coup d’etat is when there are soldiers in the streets.”Neighbouring countries’ responses to the ousting of Morales have reflected the ideological divisions of a continent where populism on the right and the left has been on the rise once again.Those backing Morales included Venezuela’s embattled leader Nicolás Maduro, Nicaragua’s seemingly eternal president Daniel Ortega, and Cuba’s Miguel Díaz-Canel.This camp also includes Brazil’s former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who blamed it on Latin America’s “economic elite”, and Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández, who said it returned the region to “the bad days of the 70s”.Brazil’s current far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, has been the loudest voice against Morales. “The left uses the word ‘coup’ a lot when it loses, right?” he told O Globo.Other regional leaders have avoided the subject – most notably Chile’s conservative president, Sebastián Piñera, who is clinging to power in the face of a wave of social unrest. His government issued a statement calling for a peaceful and democratic solution. Similar statements have come out of Peru and Colombia.Beyond the region, Donald Trump said that Morales’s resignation “preserves democracy”, while in the UK the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn condemned the “coup against the Bolivian people”.Oliver Stuenkel, an international relations professor at Fundação Getúlio Vargas University in São Paulo, said that describing what happened in Bolivia as a coup did not necessarily imply that Morales had respected democratic norms.“In fact, non-democratic governments are often overthrown through non-democratic means, precisely because they cannot easily be voted out of office,” he tweeted.Meanwhile, Mexico’s very public offer of asylum – which was made before Morales had even asked for it – has prompted some critics of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to accuse him of seeking a distraction from the country’s own security crisis.On Tuesday, Ebrard insisted it fell squarely within a long tradition in which Mexico has provided safety for persecuted political leaders, from Leon Trotsky to activists who fled Argentina and Chile during the military dictatorships of the 70s and 80s.“This is a tradition we should be proud of and continue,” Ebrard said on Tuesday.


A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China

A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China


Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secrets

Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secretsA Chinese national pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing trade secrets from U.S. petroleum company Phillips 66 , where he worked on the research and development of next generation battery technologies, the U.S. Justice Department said. Hongjin Tan, 36, stole information regarding the manufacture of a "research and development downstream energy market product" that is worth more than $1 billion, the department said in a statement. The department identified the company where he worked as Phillips 66 in court documents filed in Oklahoma.


Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPA

Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPAThe mercury rule has protected Americans from dangerous pollution. Changing it threatens gains that include cleaner air and edible seafood.


Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's why

Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's whyWhy aren't more credibly accused Catholic priests in prison? Blame it on laws that don't allow enough time for abuse survivors to come forward


A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eating

A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eatingBay Area Rapid Transit police said Steve Foster, of Concord, California, violated state law by eating a sandwich on a BART station's platform.


Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in Syria

Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in SyriaA defense industry source told Russian news outlet Izvestia last month that the S-500 recently underwent field testing in Syria, where the Russian Aerospace Forces continue to maintain a significant presence. Moscow denied it--but won't dey what they think this air defense platform could do in battle.


Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptopsA federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry. ACLU attorney Esha Bhandari said the ruling strengthens the Fourth Amendment protections of international travelers who enter the United States every year.


Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech

Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech(Bloomberg) -- Former Brazil President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gave a strong speech on Saturday to a crowd of supporters gathered in front of a metalworkers union headquarters outside the city of Sao Paulo. He criticized the Carwash corruption probe and the market-friendly agenda that is being implemented by President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration and Economy Minister Paulo Guedes’ team. Bolsonaro and his ministers struck back, while military army representatives worry about the risk of violence, according to the local newspapers.Criticism of Guedes“I doubt that the dream-destroying minister, the job-destroyer, the destroyer of Brazilian public companies called Guedes, sleeps with a clear conscience,” Lula said in a speech on Saturday. At the same time, Lula said that Bolsonaro was democratically elected and that the result must be accepted.Lula’s TravelsLula has pledged to travel around Brazil and Latin America, offering support for leftist leaders at a moment when the region is engulfed by growing political turmoil. Lula is expected to start his tour in the Northeast of Brazil, this Sunday, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Bolsonaro’s ReplyBolsonaro broke his silence about Lula’s release and wrote that he will not respond to “criminals who are now free,” via Twitter. Bolsonaro also met top military officials on Saturday morning to assess the outlook after the former president’s release, according to Estado.Military Concern Among the military, there is concern that Lula’s speech may incite violence, according to Estado. According to Folha de S.Paulo, the army fears the risk of radicalization between Bolsonaro and Lula’s supporters, but considers that both were reasonably reserved in their initial comments.CounterattackGuedes’s team is preparing for ways to counter Lula’s speeches. The ministry is betting on the argument that the economy is gaining steam, and that the government has released money, such as the FGTS funds, without cutting benefits, according to Folha. Bolsonaro also endorsed Justice Minister Sergio Moro’s reaction to Lula, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Moro has become a key player in Bolsonaro’s strategy of confronting Lula. The president himself accused Lula of causing the stock market drop on Friday:Agenda Keeps Advancing The government is set to launch a package to encourage the hiring of young and old people. The pension reform may be enacted on Tuesday, while the Senate is expected to complete the first round vote a constitutional amendment to include states and municipalities in the pension reform. The government is expected send a proposal for public administration reform to the lower house. Congress also looks set to speed up debate about jail time for convicts, following last week’s Supreme Court decision.ObstructionBrazil parties pledge to obstruct other agenda items in order to discuss imprisonment. Podemos and Novo parties will obstruct the lower house’s plenary and committees until a constitutional amendment proposal dealing with the rule on imprisonment after first appeal is voted on. Moro also defended the amendment.Bolsonaro about BoliviaLula and Bolsonaro’s reactions to the crisis in Bolivia reflect the growing polarization in Brazil. While Lula called it a “coup,” Bolsonaro said the word “coup” is only used when the left loses, according to O Globo.Other highlightsBolsonaro has sold 91 billion reais in assets of Banco do Brasil, Petrobras and Caixa: Folha de S.PauloGovernment arranges meetings with international oil companies: Valor EconomicoInfrastructure studies fusion between three state-owned transport area: Valor EconomicoNewspaper Top StoriesO Estado de S. Paulo, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo Newspapers highlight Evo Morales’ resignation in BoliviaValor EconomicoReports that only 6% of cities meet basic sanitation goalsTo contact the translation editor responsible for this story: Matthew Malinowski at mmalinowski@bloomberg.netReporter on the original story: Fernando Travaglini in in São Paulo at ftravaglini@bloomberg.netEditors responsible for the original story: Daniela Milanese at dmilanese@bloomberg.net, Josue LeonelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation reveals

Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation revealsEmails to former Breitbart writer show Miller focused on inserting white nationalist talking points to shape 2016 election coverageStephen Miller, senior adviser to Donald Trump, walks across the South Lawn of the White House on 4 November. Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPASenior Trump adviser Stephen Miller shaped the 2016 election coverage of the hard right-wing website Breitbart with material drawn from prominent white nationalists, Islamophobes, and far-right websites, according to a new investigative report by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).Miller also railed against those wishing to remove Confederate monuments and flags from public display in the wake of Dylann Roof’s murderous 2015 attack on a black church in Charleston, South Carolina, and praised America’s early 20th-century race-based, restrictionist immigration policies.Emails from Miller to a former Breitbart writer, sent before and after he joined the Trump campaign, show Miller obsessively focused on injecting white nationalist-style talking points on race and crime, Confederate monuments, and Islam into the far-right website’s campaign coverage, the SPLC report says.Miller, one of the few surviving initial appointees in the administration, has been credited with orchestrating Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies.The SPLC story is based largely on emails provided by a former Breitbart writer, Katie McHugh. McHugh was fired by Breitbart over a series of anti-Muslim tweets and has since renounced the far right, telling the SPLC that the movement is “evil”.However, throughout 2015 and 2016, as the Trump campaign progressed and she became an increasingly influential voice at Breitbart, McHugh told the SPLC that Miller urged her in a steady drumbeat of emails and phone calls to promote arguments from sources popular with far-right and white nationalist movements.Miller’s emails had a “strikingly narrow” focus on race and immigration, according to the SPLC report.At various times, the SPLC reports, Miller recommendations for McHugh included the white nationalist website, VDare; Camp of the Saints, a racist novel focused on a “replacement” of European whites by mass third-world immigration; conspiracy site Infowars; and Refugee Resettlement Watch, a fringe anti-immigrant site whose tagline is “They are changing America by changing the people”.McHugh also says that in a phone call, Miller suggested that she promote an analysis of race and crime featured on the website of a white nationalist organization, American Renaissance. The American Renaissance article he mentioned was the subject of significant interest on the far right in 2015.In the two weeks following the murder of nine people at a church in Charleston by the white supremacist Dylann Roof as Americans demanded the removal of Confederate statues and flags, Miller encouraged McHugh to turn the narrative back on leftists and Latinos.“Should the cross be removed from immigrant communities, in light of the history of Spanish conquest?” he asked in one email on 24 June.“When will the left be made to apologize for the blood on their hands supporting every commie regime since Stalin?” he asked in another the following day.When another mass shooting happened in Oregon in October 2015, Miller wrote that the killer, Chris Harper-Mercer “is described as ‘mixed race’ and born in England. Any chance of piecing that profile together more, or will it all be covered up?”Miller repeatedly brings up President Calvin Coolidge, who is revered among white nationalists for signing the 1924 Immigration Act which included racial quotas for immigration.In one email, Miller remarks on a report about the beginning of Immigrant Heritage Month by writing: “This would seem a good opportunity to remind people about the heritage established by Calvin Coolidge, which covers four decades of the 20th century.” The four decades in question is the period between the passage of the Immigration Act and the abolition of racial quotas.Miller also hints at conspiratorial explanations for the maintenance of current immigration policies. Mainstream coverage of the 50th anniversary of the removal of racial quotas in immigration policy had lacked detail, Miller believed, because “Elites can’t allow the people to see that their condition is not the product of events beyond their control, but the product of policy they foisted onto them.”.Miller used a US government email address during the early part of the correspondence, when he was an aide to senator Jeff Sessions, and then announced his new job on the Trump campaign, and a new email address, to recipients including McHugh.As well as McHugh, recipients of his emails included others then at Breitbart who subsequently worked in the Trump administration, including Steve Bannon and current Trump aide, Julia Hahn.


U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commander

U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commanderAt a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the ISIS militants and prevent the extremists from resurging or breaking out of prisons.


Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of Kosovo

Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of KosovoGhana has revoked its "premature" recognition of Kosovo -- a move backed by Serbia, which opposes statehood for the former Yugoslav province. "The government of Ghana has decided to withdraw Ghana’s recognition of Kosovo as an independent state," deputy foreign minister Charles Owiredu told AFP on Tuesday. The reasons were communicated to Serbia in a letter, he said.


Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most Overrated

Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most OverratedHe might be one of President Trump's favorite generals, but as Hampton Sides writes, Douglas MacArthur was far from a military genius.


Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police say

Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police sayAuthorities say Alexis Crawford and her roommate Jordyn Jones had a physical altercation and Jones' boyfriend intervened and choked Crawford to death.


Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII site

Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII siteTour operators and the Japanese ambassador to the Solomons say it appears to be a case of a lack of understanding of the significance of the Alligator Creek site by the new owner. The issue has stirred up debate in the Solomons concerning its new relationship with China, which was formalized in September following the Pacific island nation's decision to sever its diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of Beijing.


Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?

Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?Taipei is worried about China.


Most distant world ever explored gets new name: Arrokoth

Most distant world ever explored gets new name: ArrokothThe most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year's Day, 3 ½ years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us.


Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. Reentry

Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. ReentryRepresentative Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) called on the State Department Monday to ban the bodyguards of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan who assaulted protesters in a 2017 incident in Washington, D.C. from reentering the U.S.In May 2017, members of the Turkish Presidential Protection Department (TPPD), Turkey's equivalent of the Secret Service, attacked pro-Kurdish protesters outside the residence of the Turkish ambassador. The assault, in which protesters and American law-enforcement officials were injured, was captured on video.In a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Cheney requested that "none of the people who were in the United States with President Erdoğan in 2017 and participated in physical attacks on American citizens—including those protesting lawfully, our secret service, our diplomatic service, and our law enforcement officials—will be allowed into the United States again this week.""At least eleven people were injured throughout the day, including law enforcement personnel who every day defend Americans' constitutional rights and physical safety," Cheney wrote.The letter comes in advance of a planned White House visit by Erdogan this Wednesday.TPPD agents have a history of confrontational incidents on U.S. soil. In 2016, TPPD officers attacked journalists at a Brookings Institution event, and in 2011, they attacked U.N. security personnel at U.N. headquarters in New York.Pompeo on Monday said that President Trump will raise the topic of Turkey's recent invasion of Syria in his meeting with Erdogan."We will talk about what transpired there and how we can do our level best collectively to ensure the protection of all of those in Syria, not just the Kurds, but everyone in Syria," Pompeo told cadets at The Citadel after delivering a Veterans Day speech.


Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’

Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’Hezbollah amassed great power even as its fighters died in Syria. But the bold uprising in Lebanon has brought quiet Shiite grumblings into the open.


Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in Britain

Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in BritainSAMUEL CORUMHillary Clinton has said she wishes she could hug Meghan Markle as she accused the mainstream British media of participating in a cycle of abuse against her motivated by racism and sexism.The former first lady and presidential candidate was appearing on BBC radio in Britain to promote a new book she has written with her daughter, Chelsea, about “gutsy” women.Don’t Expect Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Media War to Simmer Down SoonHillary said the abuse she had suffered was “heartbreaking and wrong” and said she was in no doubt there was a racial element to the abuse she has endured since starting a relationship with Harry in 2016 and marrying him in 2018.Meghan and Harry have been outspoken in their criticism of the press: Meghan is suing the Mail on Sunday after alleging the paper unlawfully published a private letter to her father, while the prince is bringing a separate case alleging phone-hacking.Asked to comment on her legal action, Chelsea Clinton said: “We each have to do what we think is the right thing for ourselves and in her case I would imagine for her son… I think absolutely there’s a racist and a sexist element to what’s going on here.” Hillary added that “race was clearly an element” in some of the social-media backlash Meghan had faced since her relationship with the prince began in 2016, and that traditional media had amplified that.  “To think that some of your, what we would call mainstream media, actually allowed that to be printed in their pages, or amplified, was heartbreaking and wrong. “She is an amazing young woman, she has an incredible life story. She has stood up for herself, she has made her own way in the world. And then she falls in love, and he falls in love with her, and everybody should be celebrating that because it is a true love story.“I feel as a mother I just want to put my arms around her. Oh my God, I want to hug her. I want to tell her to hang in there, don’t let those bad guys get you down.”Clinton suggested that Meghan could employ “some humor, some deflection” to better cope with negative attention.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymous

Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymousA Republican lawmaker on Sunday broke with the President Trump and fellow party members to reject the idea that the whistleblower whose complaint prompted an impeachment inquiry into the president should have to testify publicly.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First Amendment

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First AmendmentOcasio-Cortez recently apologized for blocking a critic on Twitter and settled a lawsuit he filed alleging she violated the First Amendment.


Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrants

Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrantsThe Supreme Court appeared likely to side with the Trump administration in its effort to end the DACA program for 660,000 undocumented immigrants.


These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested

These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested


Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)But a larger question looms.


Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible week

Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible weekRepublicans who lead the Wisconsin Assembly voted Tuesday to call the state Capitol evergreen a Christmas tree and formally recognize National Bible Week, moves they said were necessary to ensure Christianity isn't marginalized as the holidays approach. The 64-30 vote on naming the tree was a direct response to Gov. Tony Evers' declaration last week that it would be called a "holiday tree." Evers' Republican predecessor Scott Walker, the son of a Baptist minister, declared the evergreen was a Christmas tree during his first term in 2011. "It seems like the only religion we're willing to take shots at is Christianity," Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke told reporters during a news conference.


Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandal

Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandalTaiwan is seeking the return of hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten funds linked to a controversial deal to buy French frigates over two decades ago, prosecutors said Tuesday. Taiwanese arms dealer Andrew Wang was indicted for corruption in 2006 for reaping hundreds of millions of dollars from the deal, and his family were also found guilty as his accomplices. Wang and his family were put on Taiwan's most wanted list after they fled the island shortly before the scandal broke in 1993.


Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrest

Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrestIraq's top Shi'ite cleric on Monday expressed concern that the political elite is not serious about enacting reforms in the face of mass unrest and said protesters should not go home until concrete steps had been taken to meet their demands. Security forces shot dead two protesters in the city of Nassiriya, bringing to 300 the number of people have been killed since protests against political corruption, unemployment and poor public services erupted in Baghdad on Oct. 1 and spread to the southern Shi'ite heartlands. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, who only speaks on politics in times of crisis and wields enormous influence over public opinion in Shi'ite-majority Iraq, on Monday met Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, the U.N. mission chief in the country.


Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s Market

Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s MarketCourtesy of The Purple Shirt BrigadeThe arrest of an inflatable purple unicorn on Saturday wasn’t even close to the strangest event to unfold at Bloomington, Indiana’s Community Farmers’ Market this year.The market was once the peaceful home of fresh vegetables and goat cheese. But after the owners of a market stall were outed as supporters of a white supremacist group, it has become the center of a fierce debate on bigotry and free speech. The controversy has led to new rules about where people can hold signs and distribute flyers in the market—and on Saturday, five anti-racist protesters were arrested for allegedly breaking those rules.The unicorn was the first to go. Dressed in an inflatable purple pony suit with a golden horn, protester Forrest Gilmore was removed from the market by two police officers, each gripping one of his purple hooves.Gilmore is part of the Purple Shirt Brigade, an activist coalition that formed this year in response to allegations of white supremacists working at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market. Those allegations began after the arrest of Indiana resident Nolan Brewer for spray-painting Nazi flags on the side of a synagogue and setting off a fire outside. Brewer told authorities he was a dues-paying member of the hate group Identity Evropa, and described getting dinner with another member: Sarah Dye and her husband Douglas Mackey. Brewer also told investigators the screenname Dye used in an Identity Evropa chat room. Local activists then matched that name to Dye and a series of racist messages she posted as “Volkmom.” (Dye denies being a white supremacist, but describes herself as an “identitarian,” a term with little to no meaningful distinction from white supremacy, and which has become popular among white supremacists hoping for more mainstream acceptance.)Farmers’ Markets Have New Unwelcome Guests: FascistsActivists also connected Dye to Schooner Creek Farm, the farm she runs with her husband. The two have a stall in the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market, where some local activists began distributing “Don’t Buy Veggies From Nazis” buttons this summer. The group “No Space for Hate” announced plans to protest at the market, prompting counter-protests from right-wing groups like a local “Three Percenter” militia and new rules about where and how people can express themselves in the market. One anti-Schooner Creek protester was arrested for holding a sign in front of the stall.Bloomington officials ruled this summer that Schooner Creek Farm was not breaking any rules, and that Dye and her husband had a First Amendment right to their beliefs. The protests, however, became the subject of new rules. “New signage will clearly indicate areas designated for flyering and expression and publicize market rules,” the city announced in August.On Saturday, the Purple Shirt Brigade tested those rules.“The idea was to find a way to protest directly in the market,” a spokesperson for the group told The Daily Beast. “Most of us had been protesting with No Space for Hate previously (and still are). The market had created rules earlier in the summer to ban the use of signs in the marketplace.”The group pointed to pictures of a number of recent guests with far-right ties at the Schooner Creek farm stand, including Patrick Casey, the leader of Identity Evropa (which rebranded this year as the American Identity Movement). Casey and other group members attended Unite the Right, the deadly 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.‘Whiter Every Election Cycle’: How Identity Evropa, a Far-Right Hate Group, Joined the GOPOnline, the farm stand has also received support from the right. When Dye shared pictures of protesters this summer (“violent Indiana ANTIFA terrorists at our farmers market booth today”), a commenter asked, “why didn’t anyone just shoot them?”Previously, the Purple Shirt Brigade skirted the anti-signage laws by printing their messages on T-shirts. (“Justice is what love looks like in public,” the shirts read, “Boycott Schooner Creek Farm.”) But they’ve pushed the rules in a bid to see exactly what’s allowed.“We have wanted to challenge the signage rule because we believe it's a violation of our First Amendment rights,” the spokesperson said. “One week we brought purple fans to the market (they looked like signs), and the market staff let us get away with that. However, this week we created signs with statements made by SCF supporters about us (from Facebook comments).”Protesters carrying the signs dressed up as unicorns, vikings, and Wonder Woman. Five were arrested on counts of disorderly conduct and trespassing, and issued 24-hour bans from the market area, the Bloomingtonian reported.In a video captured by the Bloomingtonian, the purple-clad protesters sang “no neo-Nazis in the market” while two unicorns argued with a police officer over exactly how they could protest.“So we can’t sing?” one unicorn asked over the sound of a guitar.“Not in here,” the officer responded. He turned to the other unicorn. “Forrest, I need you to leave as well.”Police were filmed writing the unicorn a citation shortly thereafter.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the Law

No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the LawA  video of New York City police officers arresting a woman for selling churros in a subway station in Brooklyn on Friday night went viral over the weekend -- sparking a lot of outrage on her behalf.The incident made headlines after New York City resident Sofia B. Newman tweeted the video, along with an explanation of what she’d seen:> Tonight as I was leaving Broadway Junction, I saw three or four police officers (one of them was either a plainclothes cop or someone who worked at the station) gathered around a crying woman and her churro cart. Apparently, it's illegal to sell food inside train stations. 1/? pic.twitter.com/sgQVvSHUik> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> They were telling her that she could either give them her churro cart and receive a fine (one that she probably wouldn't have been able to afford), or that they would take her cart and arrest her. 2/?> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> She kept trying to speak to one of the cops in Spanish, but the plainclothes cop kept rolling his eyes and saying things like, "Are you done?" and "I know you can speak English." Eventually, they cuffed her and unceremoniously dragged her and her cart away. 3/? pic.twitter.com/qVIfN7DO7u> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019 According to the Associated Press, the NYPD claims that the woman in the video had received a total of ten summonses for “unlicensed vending” within the past six months. After she was handcuffed, it reports, the cops ultimately let her go with a ticket -- but kept her cart as “arrest evidence.”Unfortunately, this week’s criminalization-of-churros news didn’t end there. The New York Daily News reported on Monday that another woman had been arrested in Brooklyn for selling churros that morning, too.Needless to say, these arrests have been the subject of a lot of controversy. The woman who was arrested Friday, who wanted to be identified only as “Elsa,” told reporters (with the help of a translator) on Monday that the officers eventually “became violent” during the incident, and that she had “felt horrible, nervous and stressed” throughout the ordeal. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, on the other hand, insisted that the police had done nothing wrong, that “she was there multiple times and was told multiple times that this [was] not a place you can be and it’s against the law,” that “she shouldn’t have been there,” that what she did was “not acceptable behavior,” and that the NYPD “officers comported themselves properly from what I can see.” The New York Times ran a story with the headline: “A Woman Selling Churros Was Handcuffed. The Police Face a Backlash.” The Daily News did something similar with its piece, “Police accused of ‘overreach’ in arresting churro seller in Brooklyn subway.”Now, I can’t be sure whether or not the NYPD officers actually “became violent” during the incident with Elsa, as she alleges that they did. I certainly didn’t see that in the video footage, but it’s always a possibility that things happened that weren’t captured. What’s more, I also believe that New York City’s police officers could probably find some more worthwhile things to do than arrest people for selling fried sugar-dough.Still, I can’t help but notice that something seems to be missing from the conversation: Why does no one seem to be pissed off about the law that gives the NYPD the power to arrest these women, and those like them, in the first place?Although I would agree that the police shouldn’t be making these sorts of things a priority, we should also take this opportunity to observe how Big Government can hurt the same people that it claims to want to help. Think about it: Liberal politicians often push for stricter government regulation of businesses and then, in the same breath, claim that they’re the party of the “little guy,” of the disadvantaged and the struggling. Here, we see that that isn’t always the case. Here, what the “little guy” needs most from the government is to do less, so that she can do more for herself.The truth is, stories like this week’s War on Churros serve as evidence against the common misconception that a limited-government philosophy amounts to cold-heartedness, to a cruel disregard (or even outright hatred) for those in this country who are struggling. The truth is, sometimes the best way for the government to help those in need is to stop itself from “helping” them at all.If you have a problem with women being handcuffed for trying to make a living selling pastries, then good; we agree. So, join me in calling for the law to be changed -- so that people can be free to carve out their own living, without fear of arrest, in the country that’s supposed to stand for that exact thing.


13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance Rates

13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance RatesThe U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: Colleges, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.


Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for trips

Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for tripsBurisma gave more than $450,000 to the Atlantic Council, a prominent Washington think tank.


PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rain

PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rainTourists and Venetians alike have donned high boots and taken to temporary raised walkways to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city.


Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian Reaction

Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian ReactionLeah Millis/ReutersUnder Mick Mulvaney’s leadership, the Office of Management and Budget temporarily put a hold on the delivery of anti-tank missiles to Ukraine in 2017 because of concerns their arrival would upset Russia, according to former White House official Catherine Croft. She described OMB’s objection as “highly unusual.”Croft’s testimony indicates that concerns about the U.S. relationship with Russia had a direct—though short-lived—impact on U.S./Ukraine policy in the first year of Trump’s presidency.Croft told congressional impeachment investigators that after the Trump administration greenlit the delivery of Javelin missiles to Ukraine in late 2017—the first delivery of lethal aid to the country since Russian separatists seized territory in its Eastern region in 2014—Mulvaney’s office held it up. “Did you understand why?” asked the congressional staffer questioning her. “I understood the reason to be a policy one,” she replied. “What was the policy one?” “In a briefing with Mick Mulvaney, the question centered around the Russian reaction,” she continued. “What was the concern about the Russian reaction?” asked the staffer. “That Russia would react negatively to the provision of Javelins to Ukraine,” she said. The Daily Beast first reported last month that OMB held up the 2017 shipment of Javelins to Ukraine. Croft said the hold lasted “about a week or two,” and that “all of the policy agencies” wanted the aid to go to Ukraine. She said OMB’s interest in the decision about whether to send Javelins to Ukraine was abnormal. Key Impeachment Witnesses Finger Mulvaney In the Quid Pro Quo“[It] was rather unusual to have OMB expressing concerns that were purely policy-based and not budget-oriented,” she said. “At the beginning of the Ukrainian Javelin process, I had been told that OMB was taking a policy interest,” she continued. “And OMB began sending working level officials to attend meetings... which was very unusual at the time.” She noted that OMB staff also started attending meetings regarding aid to countries besides Ukraine and that the increase in their involvement was “quite taxing on a very small organization.”Mulvaney and several other OMB officials have refused to participate in the congressional impeachment inquiry. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurtPirates attacked an Italy-flagged offshore supply vessel in the southern Gulf of Mexico, injuring two crew members, the Mexican Navy said on Tuesday, in the latest outbreak of robbery and piracy to hit oil platforms and infrastructure in the area. Owned by Italian offshore contractor Micoperi, the boat is a supply vessel for Mexico's oil industry. Micoperi and the Italian embassy in Mexico did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergarten

51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergartenMore than 50 people, mostly children, were injured by a man who broke into a kindergarten in southwest China and sprayed them with corrosive liquid, local authorities said Tuesday. The suspect, a 23-year-old surnamed Kong, entered the kindergarten by climbing a wall before spraying victims with sodium hydroxide, said local authorities in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province. The attack took place on Monday at 3:35 pm (0735 GMT), authorities said on their Twitter-like Weibo account.


Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estate

Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estateA woman who confronted Jeffrey Epstein at a July bail hearing to tell a judge he touched her inappropriately when she was 16 sued his estate Tuesday, alleging he had subjected her to sex trafficking as part of his attacks on young women and girls. Lawyers for Annie Farmer filed the lawsuit in Manhattan federal court, along with a lawsuit on behalf of her sister, Maria Farmer, and Teresa Helm, an Ohio woman. A lawyer for Epstein's estate did not return a message seeking comment.


Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia commentsTulsi Gabbard's lawyers want Hillary Clinton to make her retraction at a press conference and on social media.


How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?

How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?Though Germany eventually lost World War II and France again ended up on the victorious side, the leadership traits demonstrated before and during the battle in 1940 are textbook examples of what makes for great leadership—and what kind of leadership leads to defeat.


Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearing

Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearingA Connecticut man charged in the death of a hotel worker he says attacked his family in Anguilla has declined to return to the British Caribbean territory for the latest pretrial hearing, a spokesman said Monday. Scott Hapgood, of Darien, is worried about his safety in light of death threats, and Anguilla officials have not provided assurances that he would be allowed to return home on bond after the hearing, family spokesman Jamie Diaferia said. Anguilla officials rejected an offer for Hapgood to appear by video link for Monday's hearing, Diaferia said.


Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’

Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice said Monday that reports detailing the involvement of President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in the White House’s Ukraine policy were “deeply troubling.”“What I see right now troubles me. I see a state of conflict between the foreign policy professionals and someone who says he’s acting on behalf of the president but frankly I don’t know if that is the case,” Rice said at a conference in Abu Dhabi. “This is just not a good thing. The world shouldn’t get confusing messages from the United States of America.”Multiple witnesses have alleged in house testimony that Giuliani conducted his own investigative work without regard for the administration’s formal policy.William Taylor, the former top American diplomat in Ukraine, whose testimony was released last week, asserted that Giuliani was actively undermining U.S. foreign policy.“The irregular channel seemed to focus on specific issues, specific cases, rather than the regular channel’s focus on institution building,” Taylor said, according to the transcript. “So the irregular channel, I think under the influence of Mr. Giuliani, wanted to focus on one or two specific cases, irrespective of whether it helped solve the corruption problem, fight the corruption problem.”Earlier Monday, news broke that Lev Parnas, an associate of Giuliani, will tell investigators that Giuliani attempted to leverage an official visit from Vice President Mike Pence to coax Ukraine into announcing an investigation into Joe Biden's son Hunter's business connections to Burisma.Rice also said she thought Trump’s mention of former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma, during the call was “out of bounds.”“The call is murky, it is really murky. I don’t like for the president of the United States to mention an American citizen for investigation to a foreign leader,” Rice said.


Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020

Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020Hillary Clinton on Tuesday declined to rule out launching a future presidential campaign after her two failed bids, saying “many, many, many people” were pressuring her to enter the race.


Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight

Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight(Bloomberg) -- Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has done his best to keep a low profile in the 13 months since one of the most polarizing Senate confirmation fights in U.S. history.From the bench, his questions have been evenhanded and his opinions have been measured. His public appearances have been rare.But Kavanaugh will be back in the spotlight when he gives the featured dinner speech on Thursday at the annual Washington convention of the Federalist Society, the powerful conservative legal group that helped put him on the court.The appearance, in front of an organization Kavanaugh joined in 1988 as a law student, will offer a reminder of his professional roots and help showcase the group’s success in helping load the federal courts with conservative judges -- one of President Donald Trump’s signature achievements.It will also provide a fresh indication of how the Supreme Court’s most controversial justice will navigate the raw feelings that remain after his nomination by Trump and narrow Senate confirmation in the face of sexual assault allegations.About 2,300 people are expected to attend the Antonin Scalia Memorial Dinner, a black-tie-optional event that brings legal luminaries to the cavernous Main Hall of Washington’s Union Station every year. The event will be open to the media, though broadcast coverage will be prohibited.When many Americans last saw Kavanaugh, he was at his Senate confirmation hearing angrily and tearfully denying that he had assaulted Christine Blasey Ford decades ago when both were teenagers.“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election,” Kavanaugh said, with rage that would later be lampooned by actor Matt Damon on “Saturday Night Live.”He was confirmed on a 50-48 vote.‘Gracious’ JusticeThat Brett Kavanaugh bears little resemblance to the one who now sits at one end of the Supreme Court bench, seen only by the few hundred people who typically attend its camera-free argument sessions.Kavanaugh tends to politely challenge both sides during arguments, almost always without tipping his hand on his own views. He often chats amicably with Justice Elena Kagan, who sits to his right and seems to have far more to discuss with him than with Justice Samuel Alito on her other side.“He seems quite comfortable,” said Carter Phillips, a veteran Supreme Court lawyer at Sidley Austin. “He’s very gracious, extremely well-prepared. His questions are good.”Kavanaugh’s written opinions have generally been measured. Though he has almost always voted with his conservative colleagues when the court splits along ideological lines, he has eschewed the sweeping rhetoric of Trump’s other Supreme Court appointee, Neil Gorsuch. On occasion, Kavanaugh has written separate opinions to describe his position as a limited one.“He appears more cautious and pragmatic than Gorsuch, but it’s too early to tell too much,” said Jonathan Adler, a professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.Kavanaugh’s colleagues have publicly welcomed him and said they don’t harbor any ill feelings.“We are all human beings, we all have pasts,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor told a judicial conference in September, according to the Wall Street Journal. “Now whether things occurred or didn’t occur, all of that is irrelevant.”Female ClerksJustice Ruth Bader Ginsburg praised Kavanaugh for hiring four women to serve as his law clerks for his first term, something no justice had done in any term.That decision is as close as Kavanaugh has come to publicly addressing the confirmation controversy since he joined the court.“It was all women, and I think that was not coincidental,” said Melissa Murray, a New York University law professor who testified during the confirmation hearing that she was concerned Kavanaugh would vote to overturn abortion rights. “I think it was intended to be a rebuttal to those who believe those allegations, took those allegations seriously. I think he wanted to sort of counteract the perception that might have been left after the confirmation hearing.”For the public at large, Kavanaugh remains a polarizing figure -- far more so than his longer-serving colleagues. A Marquette Law School poll conducted in September found that 32% of respondents had an unfavorable view of Kavanaugh, with 26% holding a favorable view. No other justice had an unfavorable rating higher than 23%.Though he has met privately with smaller groups, the Federalist Society speech will mark only the second time Kavanaugh has spoken publicly outside the court since the White House ceremony that followed his October 2018 confirmation. Kavanaugh appeared in May with the man he succeeded, Justice Anthony Kennedy, before a conference of judges and lawyers.Standing OvationKavanaugh’s reception at the Federalist Society event is all but certain to be positive, probably overwhelmingly so, though it’s possible he’ll face protests.“I expect he’ll get a very warm reception,” said Adler, a Federalist Society member who plans to attend.Kavanaugh got a lengthy standing ovation when he arrived for last year’s dinner, which took place less than six weeks after the Senate vote. He opted not to give a talk at that event, instead agreeing to speak this year, according to two people familiar with the planning.The Federalist Society’s executive vice president, Leonard Leo, has served as a key adviser to Trump on judicial nominations. Leo declined to be interviewed about Kavanaugh’s work on the court, saying he generally doesn’t comment on individual justices.The dinner is part of a three-day program that features speeches by Gorsuch and Attorney General Bill Barr as well as panel discussions on a plethora of legal topics.“I think it is meaningful that he’s choosing to make a debut of sorts at this particular venue,” Murray said.Chances are Kavanaugh’s speech will steer clear of any discussion of the confirmation controversy. He probably will at least touch on the judicial philosophy that made him a Federalist Society favorite in the first place. He might show the side of himself that promised at his confirmation hearing to be part of a “team of nine” on the court.“I think it will be different than it was in his last public appearance,” said Phillips with a laugh. “He is by nature a gracious and even-tempered person. I expect that that’s the way he will come across.”To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay bar

Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay barA Ugandan court charged 67 people with causing a nuisance on Tuesday after they were arrested in a gay-friendly bar, in a move condemned by activists as the latest "homophobic" attack. The 67 - who were among 127 arrested at Ram Bar, in the capital, Kampala, on Sunday - could face up to one year in jail if found guilty, said Patricia Kimera, a lawyer for the group. "This is just a homophobic attack," LGBT+ activist Raymond Karuhanga told the Thomson Reuters Foundation outside the court.


See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel


With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil War

With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarA traffic police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed 21-year-old pro-democracy protester at point-blank range on Monday. Hours later, a man was set on fire after defending Beijing in an argument. Both individuals were listed in critical condition.Over the weekend, wide-scale disturbances scarred the territory, a semi-autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China. There is essentially a rebellion in Hong Kong. Riot police in green uniforms are doing battle with youthful demonstrators dressed in black. How Hong Kong Protesters Show Which Businesses Are Friend or FoeProtests began in April after Chief Executive Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s top official, proposed legislation authorizing the extradition of fugitives to various jurisdictions, including Mainland China. Starting June 9, when an estimated one million Hong Kongers marched in the streets, demonstrations have been almost continuous. Lam has since permanently withdrawn the extradition bill from consideration, but the protests have not abated. Especially this week. Hong Kong braced for a weekend of disturbances after Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died on Friday after falling from a car park the preceding Sunday while running away from police tear gas. Many have accused the police of delaying medical assistance to the mortally injured Chow.Chow has been called “the first fatality linked to police action during a protest,” but many believe the police have killed others. Demonstrators believe three of their number were beaten to death on August 31 in the Prince Edward Mass Transit Railway station in Mong Kok. Since then, the above-ground entrance to the station has become a shrine, protestors have repeatedly rallied in front of the adjacent Mong Kok police station, and youth have continually trashed MTR trains and stations because they believe management of the rail system has withheld surveillance-camera footage.Even a single death creates a cycle of revenge and retaliation that is almost impossible to control. Chow’s passing sparked a weekend of rage.Moreover, Chief Executive Lam added to the tensions. In her most recent press conference, held Monday after the shooting and burning incidents, she called protesters the “enemy of the people.” Her provocative Cultural Revolution-speak comment came on the heels of her November 4 meeting with Chinese ruler Xi Jinping. China is apparently controlling events, and either out of obliviousness or maliciousness, it is making the situation worse. Beijing has been doing that by forcing Lam to take a hard line. Apart from the withdrawal of the extradition bill—doomed because the normally pro-Beijing business community came out against it early on—she has been intransigent. That intransigence was evident from her Monday remarks. She said she would not yield to violence, but she had previously left Hong Kong people no choice. She had, with her stubbornness, earlier foreclosed the possibility of peaceful change.Hong Kong people may not be able to change her mind, but she cannot change theirs either. The army in black—as well as many other people in the territory—have continued to protest.Analysts say Beijing will eventually lose patience and use force. “This kind of extreme, violent, and destructive activity would not be tolerated or accepted in any country or society in the world nowadays,” said Chinese Vice-Premier Han Zheng as he met with Lam early this month in Beijing.Han’s words were taken as a threat to formally deploy units of the People’s Liberation Army or the People’s Armed Police to the streets of Hong Kong to “crush” the protests and reestablish order. Beijing could move in troops, but the move is unlikely to work. Hong Kong, after all, is ideal territory for defenders, like guerilla fighters supported by an overwhelming portion of the public. Every apartment building there is a fort where hostiles can rain down explosives or petrol bombs on Chinese troops and then disappear into their homes or back alleys. Xi Jinping surely does not want his first war to take tens of thousands of soldiers, last years if not decades, and end in a loss for China.In the meantime, there is credible evidence suggesting Mainland Chinese personnel—troops or police—are now operating on Hong Kong streets in police uniforms. This sly tactic is not working, however. Why not? The Hong Kong police department, once considered the most professional force of its kind in Asia, has lost discipline, something evident from the shooting of the protester Monday and countless other incidents. The breakdown in discipline roughly coincides with early evidence that Chinese forces were mixed in with the Hong Kong police, and the resulting rough tactics have resulted in a loss of support of ordinary residents tired of being tear gassed, clubbed, and manhandled. All this raises the question whether Beijing has given the green light to police officers to act as brutally as they want. Yet whether China did so or not, harsh action by the police is sustaining support for the protesters. Demonstrators this past weekend were chanting “Revenge.” Hong Kong is now at war with itself. There is no end in sight to the fighting.LeBron James Bends the Knee to China, Fails His First Big Test as the NBA’s ConscienceRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack Obama

Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack ObamaPete Buttigieg got in hot water with many loyal Democrats on Sunday when the Los Angeles Times reported that he cited the "failures of the Obama era" as part of why Trump's election happened. This inspired furious outrage from liberal partisans and party apparatchiks -- only soothed (and tweets deleted) when the reporter said he had misquoted Buttigieg, who was then quick to lavish praise on the ex-president.But as it turns out, Buttigieg previously said almost the exact same thing in a recent interview with Showtime's The Circus. "I don't think there's going back to Obama... the American political world we've been in from the day I was born, has been blown up," he explained, "[thanks to] its own failures which culminated in Trump. Look, if the old way worked, something like Trump would never have been possible."So this recent flap sure looks like another flip-flop from Payola Pete, mayor of Indiana's fourth largest city. But at least in his beta release form, I have to admit that Buttigieg was completely correct. Democrats really need to get over this worshipful reverence of Barack Obama.For one thing, it is simply beyond question that the Obama years were a political disaster. From having commanding majorities in both the House and the Senate, Democrats lost first the former, then the latter, and finally the presidency, as the candidate running as Obama's successor bobbled perhaps the easiest lay-up election in American history. Meanwhile, the party all but collapsed in many states, as devastating national defeats translated into the loss of over 1,000 state legislative seats.As I have written before, the primary reason for the Obama-era Democrats' initial crushing loss in 2010, which locked in Republican gains for a decade at least through their ensuing control of the state gerrymandering process, was policy error -- undershooting the size of the economic stimulus in response to the Great Recession on the one hand, and secretly using homeowner assistance money to bail out the banks on the other. The former was not entirely Obama's fault, as he had to get congressional approval for the stimulus, but the latter was entirely under his control. Millions were left out of work, and about 10 million people losing their homes wreaked further economic devastation. As any historian could tell you, being in power during a huge economic disaster is the surest possible way to get blown out of the water in the next election.If you take Obama out of the equation, what Buttigieg was saying before it looks like folks might stop sending those fat campaign checks is all but conventional wisdom even among liberals. Obama himself reportedly has grave doubts about what Trump means for his legacy. Clearly if the party could lose to the most unpopular major party nominee in the history of polling, whatever was happening before 2016 was not exactly working out.And from the other side of the fence, Obama has shown no inclination to fulfill the sort of leadership role loyal Democrats clearly crave. Despite the shattering national crisis that Trump presents, he has not gone on to a different office -- unlike, say, John Quincy Adams, who returned to the House after his presidency and fought slavery literally until his dying breath. Obama is not out there mobilizing day and night against Trump's migrant concentration camps, or his Muslim ban, or his blatant abuses of power.Only occasionally will Obama pop up to endorse candidates, often centrist or center-right white men like Emmanuel Macron or Justin Trudeau. He largely avoided campaigning in 2018 until the last few weeks before the election. He's mainly keeping to himself, hanging out with rich tycoons and celebrities, and making eye-popping sums giving paid speeches before big corporations and banks.He appears in public only occasionally -- and when he does, he has a tendency to indulge in get-off-my-lawn youth scolding that, as Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote back in 2013, was offensive and out of date when he did it as president. "This idea of purity and you're never compromised and you're always politically 'woke' and all that stuff," he said at a recent Obama Foundation summit. "You should get over that quickly. The world is messy, there are ambiguities." Just like the time when "we tortured some folks," but it was still important to "look forward as opposed to backwards" instead of enforcing the law, I suppose.Jokes aside, this almost beggars belief. President Trump is flagrantly stealing money from the American state, attempting to get foreign countries to gin up political persecutions of Obama's own vice president, and Obama is out here raising worries about exaggerated nonsense from America's most dimwitted and gullible columnists, and earning praise from loathsome trolls:> Good for Obama. (Not sarcastic!) https://t.co/cwq5mcDc7V> > -- Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) October 30, 2019Now, let me be clear: All this is, of course, Obama's complete right as a private citizen. It is, at least for the moment, still a free country. But Democrats should not follow the advice of the Washington Post's Jennifer Rubin, who argues that "it is unheard of for a party following a two-term president not to run on his achievements," in part because "Republicans did that with former president Ronald Reagan for 30 years." She would know, from her previous incarnation as a prolific and absolutely shameless propagandist for Mitt Romney. But the grim fate of the GOP is precisely the problem.We see today what you get when a party loses the ability to think critically about its history, and treats its leaders as infallible saints no matter what they do: Donald Trump.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)

America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)Russia and China have their own plans.


Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viral

Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viralA substitute teacher has been fired and charged with aggravated assault following the beating of a 15-year-old female high school student in an incident captured on video. Tiffani Shadell Lankford is free on $10,000 bond after her arrest Friday afternoon. Video of last week's incident in a foreign-language class at Lehman High School in Kyle, Texas, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Austin went viral.


Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet Altan

Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet AltanTurkish police acting on a court order rearrested journalist and novelist Ahmet Altan Tuesday, just a week after his release from prison over alleged links to the failed 2016 coup. Altan and another veteran journalist Nazli Ilicak were released on November 4 despite having been convicted of "helping a terrorist group". The Istanbul court sentenced Altan to more than 10 years in jail, but ruled that he and Ilicak should be released under supervision after time already served -- around three years each.


Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales

Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales* Ex-president’s party refuses to recognise senator’s claim * Morales says army told him of $50,000 price on his headJeanine Añez waves from the balcony of the Quemado Palace in La Paz after claiming Bolivia’s interim presidency. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Bolivian senator Jeanine Añez has declared herself the country’s interim president after the resignation of Evo Morales, even though lawmakers from his party boycotted the legislative session where she assumed office.Añez, 52, took temporary control of the Senate late on Tuesday. “I will take the measures necessary to pacify the country,” she said, swearing on a bible to loud cheers and applause. The move is expected to pave the way for fresh elections.Morales’s Movement Towards Socialism called the session illegal and its legislators refused to take part. Nearby hundreds of Morales supporters marched against Añez assuming the role. “She’s declared herself president without having a quorum in the parliament,” Julio Chipana told the Guardian. “She doesn’t represent us.”Morales, who resigned under pressure from police and the army after a fiercely disputed election, has flown into exile in Mexico, leaving a confused power vacuum behind in Bolivia. Speaking at a hastily organised press conference on the tarmac, the former president thanked Mexico for “saving my life” and repeated his accusation that his rivals had forced him out in a coup.He said that before his resignation on Sunday a member of the army had showed him messages putting a $50,000 price on his head.“I thought we had finished with the discrimination and the humiliation, but new groups have emerged that have no respect for life, let alone for the fatherland,” Morales said. “It’s another lesson to learn.”Morales, 60, was greeted with a handshake, a hug and a pat on the cheek from Mexico’s foreign minister, Marcelo Ebrard, after the flight in a Mexican army plane from the Bolivian city of Cochabamba.He defended his time in government and said that if he were guilty any crime, it was to be indigenous and “anti-imperalist”.Morales was accompanied by his former vice-president, Álvaro García Linera, who has been his closest political collaborator since before he became Bolivia’s first indigenous president in modern times.“García Linera and I have always been committed to the idea that peace can only come with social justice,” Morales said. “This coup is not going to change our ideology.”Though he promised that this was not the end of his political career, the Bolivian leader gave no indication of his immediate plans.Morales left behind a country close to chaos as supporters and opponents clashed on the streets, amid reports of fresh looting, vandalism and arson after the October election, which the Organisation of American States found to have been rigged in his favour.On Tuesday much of Bolivia’s main city, La Paz, was like a ghost town after police warned inhabitants to stay indoors. Roadblocks were thrown up across the city as the political uncertainty continued and residents feared more violent clashes.The country remained in political limbo as senators and deputies loyal to the former leader appeared to refuse to endorse the new interim president, deputy senate leader Jeanine Áñez.“The people who have been in all these protests want us to call presidential elections which are not fraudulent, which are trustworthy,” Áñez, a political opponent of Morales, told journalists in the national assembly building.Shirley Franco, an opposition member of parliament, said: “What Bolivians want in this moment of crisis is certainty and we, the maximum authorities in this country, must work to re-establish democracy.”Manning a makeshift barricade a few blocks away, anti-Morales protester Danella Ormachea, 29, said: “We want this to end. We need a new interim president to call new elections so there is democracy and our vote is respected. That’s all we ask.”Martín Cornejo Choque, a rural leader in La Paz province, denied there had been voter fraud.“Before the election, the right said if Evo Morales wins we won’t recognise it. The opposition just don’t want to recognise the votes of the rural areas,” he said.Cornejo, who led dozens of communities to La Paz’s San Francisco square in support of Morales, said Morales had transformed life for rural Bolivians.“Before when there were rightwing, neoliberal presidents they never cared about the peasant farmer. We lived in extreme poverty,” said Cornejo. “Our roads were not paved, we didn’t even have bridges but today, thanks to this government, all the peasant communities have development.”Morales’s sudden departure was a dramatic fall for the former coca growers’ union leader who swept to power 14 years ago in a historic election.He went on to win two more landslide victories and lifted millions out of poverty, but Morales’s popularity began to wane in 2016, when he ignored a referendum in which voters said he could not run for a fourth term.Mass protests broke out after last month’s election following an unexplained 24-hour halt in the voting which fuelled accusations of electoral fraud.Áñez denied that Morales had been the victim of a coup, saying: “What happened in Bolivia was the verification of monumental fraud. A coup d’etat is when there are soldiers in the streets.”Neighbouring countries’ responses to the ousting of Morales have reflected the ideological divisions of a continent where populism on the right and the left has been on the rise once again.Those backing Morales included Venezuela’s embattled leader Nicolás Maduro, Nicaragua’s seemingly eternal president Daniel Ortega, and Cuba’s Miguel Díaz-Canel.This camp also includes Brazil’s former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who blamed it on Latin America’s “economic elite”, and Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández, who said it returned the region to “the bad days of the 70s”.Brazil’s current far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, has been the loudest voice against Morales. “The left uses the word ‘coup’ a lot when it loses, right?” he told O Globo.Other regional leaders have avoided the subject – most notably Chile’s conservative president, Sebastián Piñera, who is clinging to power in the face of a wave of social unrest. His government issued a statement calling for a peaceful and democratic solution. Similar statements have come out of Peru and Colombia.Beyond the region, Donald Trump said that Morales’s resignation “preserves democracy”, while in the UK the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn condemned the “coup against the Bolivian people”.Oliver Stuenkel, an international relations professor at Fundação Getúlio Vargas University in São Paulo, said that describing what happened in Bolivia as a coup did not necessarily imply that Morales had respected democratic norms.“In fact, non-democratic governments are often overthrown through non-democratic means, precisely because they cannot easily be voted out of office,” he tweeted.Meanwhile, Mexico’s very public offer of asylum – which was made before Morales had even asked for it – has prompted some critics of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to accuse him of seeking a distraction from the country’s own security crisis.On Tuesday, Ebrard insisted it fell squarely within a long tradition in which Mexico has provided safety for persecuted political leaders, from Leon Trotsky to activists who fled Argentina and Chile during the military dictatorships of the 70s and 80s.“This is a tradition we should be proud of and continue,” Ebrard said on Tuesday.


A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China

A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China


Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secrets

Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secretsA Chinese national pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing trade secrets from U.S. petroleum company Phillips 66 , where he worked on the research and development of next generation battery technologies, the U.S. Justice Department said. Hongjin Tan, 36, stole information regarding the manufacture of a "research and development downstream energy market product" that is worth more than $1 billion, the department said in a statement. The department identified the company where he worked as Phillips 66 in court documents filed in Oklahoma.


Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPA

Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPAThe mercury rule has protected Americans from dangerous pollution. Changing it threatens gains that include cleaner air and edible seafood.


Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's why

Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's whyWhy aren't more credibly accused Catholic priests in prison? Blame it on laws that don't allow enough time for abuse survivors to come forward


A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eating

A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eatingBay Area Rapid Transit police said Steve Foster, of Concord, California, violated state law by eating a sandwich on a BART station's platform.


Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in Syria

Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in SyriaA defense industry source told Russian news outlet Izvestia last month that the S-500 recently underwent field testing in Syria, where the Russian Aerospace Forces continue to maintain a significant presence. Moscow denied it--but won't dey what they think this air defense platform could do in battle.


Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptopsA federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry. ACLU attorney Esha Bhandari said the ruling strengthens the Fourth Amendment protections of international travelers who enter the United States every year.


Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech

Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech(Bloomberg) -- Former Brazil President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gave a strong speech on Saturday to a crowd of supporters gathered in front of a metalworkers union headquarters outside the city of Sao Paulo. He criticized the Carwash corruption probe and the market-friendly agenda that is being implemented by President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration and Economy Minister Paulo Guedes’ team. Bolsonaro and his ministers struck back, while military army representatives worry about the risk of violence, according to the local newspapers.Criticism of Guedes“I doubt that the dream-destroying minister, the job-destroyer, the destroyer of Brazilian public companies called Guedes, sleeps with a clear conscience,” Lula said in a speech on Saturday. At the same time, Lula said that Bolsonaro was democratically elected and that the result must be accepted.Lula’s TravelsLula has pledged to travel around Brazil and Latin America, offering support for leftist leaders at a moment when the region is engulfed by growing political turmoil. Lula is expected to start his tour in the Northeast of Brazil, this Sunday, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Bolsonaro’s ReplyBolsonaro broke his silence about Lula’s release and wrote that he will not respond to “criminals who are now free,” via Twitter. Bolsonaro also met top military officials on Saturday morning to assess the outlook after the former president’s release, according to Estado.Military Concern Among the military, there is concern that Lula’s speech may incite violence, according to Estado. According to Folha de S.Paulo, the army fears the risk of radicalization between Bolsonaro and Lula’s supporters, but considers that both were reasonably reserved in their initial comments.CounterattackGuedes’s team is preparing for ways to counter Lula’s speeches. The ministry is betting on the argument that the economy is gaining steam, and that the government has released money, such as the FGTS funds, without cutting benefits, according to Folha. Bolsonaro also endorsed Justice Minister Sergio Moro’s reaction to Lula, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Moro has become a key player in Bolsonaro’s strategy of confronting Lula. The president himself accused Lula of causing the stock market drop on Friday:Agenda Keeps Advancing The government is set to launch a package to encourage the hiring of young and old people. The pension reform may be enacted on Tuesday, while the Senate is expected to complete the first round vote a constitutional amendment to include states and municipalities in the pension reform. The government is expected send a proposal for public administration reform to the lower house. Congress also looks set to speed up debate about jail time for convicts, following last week’s Supreme Court decision.ObstructionBrazil parties pledge to obstruct other agenda items in order to discuss imprisonment. Podemos and Novo parties will obstruct the lower house’s plenary and committees until a constitutional amendment proposal dealing with the rule on imprisonment after first appeal is voted on. Moro also defended the amendment.Bolsonaro about BoliviaLula and Bolsonaro’s reactions to the crisis in Bolivia reflect the growing polarization in Brazil. While Lula called it a “coup,” Bolsonaro said the word “coup” is only used when the left loses, according to O Globo.Other highlightsBolsonaro has sold 91 billion reais in assets of Banco do Brasil, Petrobras and Caixa: Folha de S.PauloGovernment arranges meetings with international oil companies: Valor EconomicoInfrastructure studies fusion between three state-owned transport area: Valor EconomicoNewspaper Top StoriesO Estado de S. Paulo, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo Newspapers highlight Evo Morales’ resignation in BoliviaValor EconomicoReports that only 6% of cities meet basic sanitation goalsTo contact the translation editor responsible for this story: Matthew Malinowski at mmalinowski@bloomberg.netReporter on the original story: Fernando Travaglini in in São Paulo at ftravaglini@bloomberg.netEditors responsible for the original story: Daniela Milanese at dmilanese@bloomberg.net, Josue LeonelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation reveals

Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation revealsEmails to former Breitbart writer show Miller focused on inserting white nationalist talking points to shape 2016 election coverageStephen Miller, senior adviser to Donald Trump, walks across the South Lawn of the White House on 4 November. Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPASenior Trump adviser Stephen Miller shaped the 2016 election coverage of the hard right-wing website Breitbart with material drawn from prominent white nationalists, Islamophobes, and far-right websites, according to a new investigative report by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).Miller also railed against those wishing to remove Confederate monuments and flags from public display in the wake of Dylann Roof’s murderous 2015 attack on a black church in Charleston, South Carolina, and praised America’s early 20th-century race-based, restrictionist immigration policies.Emails from Miller to a former Breitbart writer, sent before and after he joined the Trump campaign, show Miller obsessively focused on injecting white nationalist-style talking points on race and crime, Confederate monuments, and Islam into the far-right website’s campaign coverage, the SPLC report says.Miller, one of the few surviving initial appointees in the administration, has been credited with orchestrating Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies.The SPLC story is based largely on emails provided by a former Breitbart writer, Katie McHugh. McHugh was fired by Breitbart over a series of anti-Muslim tweets and has since renounced the far right, telling the SPLC that the movement is “evil”.However, throughout 2015 and 2016, as the Trump campaign progressed and she became an increasingly influential voice at Breitbart, McHugh told the SPLC that Miller urged her in a steady drumbeat of emails and phone calls to promote arguments from sources popular with far-right and white nationalist movements.Miller’s emails had a “strikingly narrow” focus on race and immigration, according to the SPLC report.At various times, the SPLC reports, Miller recommendations for McHugh included the white nationalist website, VDare; Camp of the Saints, a racist novel focused on a “replacement” of European whites by mass third-world immigration; conspiracy site Infowars; and Refugee Resettlement Watch, a fringe anti-immigrant site whose tagline is “They are changing America by changing the people”.McHugh also says that in a phone call, Miller suggested that she promote an analysis of race and crime featured on the website of a white nationalist organization, American Renaissance. The American Renaissance article he mentioned was the subject of significant interest on the far right in 2015.In the two weeks following the murder of nine people at a church in Charleston by the white supremacist Dylann Roof as Americans demanded the removal of Confederate statues and flags, Miller encouraged McHugh to turn the narrative back on leftists and Latinos.“Should the cross be removed from immigrant communities, in light of the history of Spanish conquest?” he asked in one email on 24 June.“When will the left be made to apologize for the blood on their hands supporting every commie regime since Stalin?” he asked in another the following day.When another mass shooting happened in Oregon in October 2015, Miller wrote that the killer, Chris Harper-Mercer “is described as ‘mixed race’ and born in England. Any chance of piecing that profile together more, or will it all be covered up?”Miller repeatedly brings up President Calvin Coolidge, who is revered among white nationalists for signing the 1924 Immigration Act which included racial quotas for immigration.In one email, Miller remarks on a report about the beginning of Immigrant Heritage Month by writing: “This would seem a good opportunity to remind people about the heritage established by Calvin Coolidge, which covers four decades of the 20th century.” The four decades in question is the period between the passage of the Immigration Act and the abolition of racial quotas.Miller also hints at conspiratorial explanations for the maintenance of current immigration policies. Mainstream coverage of the 50th anniversary of the removal of racial quotas in immigration policy had lacked detail, Miller believed, because “Elites can’t allow the people to see that their condition is not the product of events beyond their control, but the product of policy they foisted onto them.”.Miller used a US government email address during the early part of the correspondence, when he was an aide to senator Jeff Sessions, and then announced his new job on the Trump campaign, and a new email address, to recipients including McHugh.As well as McHugh, recipients of his emails included others then at Breitbart who subsequently worked in the Trump administration, including Steve Bannon and current Trump aide, Julia Hahn.


U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commander

U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commanderAt a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the ISIS militants and prevent the extremists from resurging or breaking out of prisons.


Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of Kosovo

Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of KosovoGhana has revoked its "premature" recognition of Kosovo -- a move backed by Serbia, which opposes statehood for the former Yugoslav province. "The government of Ghana has decided to withdraw Ghana’s recognition of Kosovo as an independent state," deputy foreign minister Charles Owiredu told AFP on Tuesday. The reasons were communicated to Serbia in a letter, he said.


Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most Overrated

Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most OverratedHe might be one of President Trump's favorite generals, but as Hampton Sides writes, Douglas MacArthur was far from a military genius.


Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police say

Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police sayAuthorities say Alexis Crawford and her roommate Jordyn Jones had a physical altercation and Jones' boyfriend intervened and choked Crawford to death.


Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII site

Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII siteTour operators and the Japanese ambassador to the Solomons say it appears to be a case of a lack of understanding of the significance of the Alligator Creek site by the new owner. The issue has stirred up debate in the Solomons concerning its new relationship with China, which was formalized in September following the Pacific island nation's decision to sever its diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of Beijing.


Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?

Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?Taipei is worried about China.


Most distant world ever explored gets new name: Arrokoth

Most distant world ever explored gets new name: ArrokothThe most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year's Day, 3 ½ years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us.


Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. Reentry

Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. ReentryRepresentative Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) called on the State Department Monday to ban the bodyguards of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan who assaulted protesters in a 2017 incident in Washington, D.C. from reentering the U.S.In May 2017, members of the Turkish Presidential Protection Department (TPPD), Turkey's equivalent of the Secret Service, attacked pro-Kurdish protesters outside the residence of the Turkish ambassador. The assault, in which protesters and American law-enforcement officials were injured, was captured on video.In a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Cheney requested that "none of the people who were in the United States with President Erdoğan in 2017 and participated in physical attacks on American citizens—including those protesting lawfully, our secret service, our diplomatic service, and our law enforcement officials—will be allowed into the United States again this week.""At least eleven people were injured throughout the day, including law enforcement personnel who every day defend Americans' constitutional rights and physical safety," Cheney wrote.The letter comes in advance of a planned White House visit by Erdogan this Wednesday.TPPD agents have a history of confrontational incidents on U.S. soil. In 2016, TPPD officers attacked journalists at a Brookings Institution event, and in 2011, they attacked U.N. security personnel at U.N. headquarters in New York.Pompeo on Monday said that President Trump will raise the topic of Turkey's recent invasion of Syria in his meeting with Erdogan."We will talk about what transpired there and how we can do our level best collectively to ensure the protection of all of those in Syria, not just the Kurds, but everyone in Syria," Pompeo told cadets at The Citadel after delivering a Veterans Day speech.


Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’

Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’Hezbollah amassed great power even as its fighters died in Syria. But the bold uprising in Lebanon has brought quiet Shiite grumblings into the open.


Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in Britain

Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in BritainSAMUEL CORUMHillary Clinton has said she wishes she could hug Meghan Markle as she accused the mainstream British media of participating in a cycle of abuse against her motivated by racism and sexism.The former first lady and presidential candidate was appearing on BBC radio in Britain to promote a new book she has written with her daughter, Chelsea, about “gutsy” women.Don’t Expect Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Media War to Simmer Down SoonHillary said the abuse she had suffered was “heartbreaking and wrong” and said she was in no doubt there was a racial element to the abuse she has endured since starting a relationship with Harry in 2016 and marrying him in 2018.Meghan and Harry have been outspoken in their criticism of the press: Meghan is suing the Mail on Sunday after alleging the paper unlawfully published a private letter to her father, while the prince is bringing a separate case alleging phone-hacking.Asked to comment on her legal action, Chelsea Clinton said: “We each have to do what we think is the right thing for ourselves and in her case I would imagine for her son… I think absolutely there’s a racist and a sexist element to what’s going on here.” Hillary added that “race was clearly an element” in some of the social-media backlash Meghan had faced since her relationship with the prince began in 2016, and that traditional media had amplified that.  “To think that some of your, what we would call mainstream media, actually allowed that to be printed in their pages, or amplified, was heartbreaking and wrong. “She is an amazing young woman, she has an incredible life story. She has stood up for herself, she has made her own way in the world. And then she falls in love, and he falls in love with her, and everybody should be celebrating that because it is a true love story.“I feel as a mother I just want to put my arms around her. Oh my God, I want to hug her. I want to tell her to hang in there, don’t let those bad guys get you down.”Clinton suggested that Meghan could employ “some humor, some deflection” to better cope with negative attention.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymous

Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymousA Republican lawmaker on Sunday broke with the President Trump and fellow party members to reject the idea that the whistleblower whose complaint prompted an impeachment inquiry into the president should have to testify publicly.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First Amendment

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First AmendmentOcasio-Cortez recently apologized for blocking a critic on Twitter and settled a lawsuit he filed alleging she violated the First Amendment.


Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrants

Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrantsThe Supreme Court appeared likely to side with the Trump administration in its effort to end the DACA program for 660,000 undocumented immigrants.


These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested

These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested


Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)But a larger question looms.


Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible week

Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible weekRepublicans who lead the Wisconsin Assembly voted Tuesday to call the state Capitol evergreen a Christmas tree and formally recognize National Bible Week, moves they said were necessary to ensure Christianity isn't marginalized as the holidays approach. The 64-30 vote on naming the tree was a direct response to Gov. Tony Evers' declaration last week that it would be called a "holiday tree." Evers' Republican predecessor Scott Walker, the son of a Baptist minister, declared the evergreen was a Christmas tree during his first term in 2011. "It seems like the only religion we're willing to take shots at is Christianity," Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke told reporters during a news conference.


Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandal

Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandalTaiwan is seeking the return of hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten funds linked to a controversial deal to buy French frigates over two decades ago, prosecutors said Tuesday. Taiwanese arms dealer Andrew Wang was indicted for corruption in 2006 for reaping hundreds of millions of dollars from the deal, and his family were also found guilty as his accomplices. Wang and his family were put on Taiwan's most wanted list after they fled the island shortly before the scandal broke in 1993.


Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrest

Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrestIraq's top Shi'ite cleric on Monday expressed concern that the political elite is not serious about enacting reforms in the face of mass unrest and said protesters should not go home until concrete steps had been taken to meet their demands. Security forces shot dead two protesters in the city of Nassiriya, bringing to 300 the number of people have been killed since protests against political corruption, unemployment and poor public services erupted in Baghdad on Oct. 1 and spread to the southern Shi'ite heartlands. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, who only speaks on politics in times of crisis and wields enormous influence over public opinion in Shi'ite-majority Iraq, on Monday met Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, the U.N. mission chief in the country.


Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s Market

Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s MarketCourtesy of The Purple Shirt BrigadeThe arrest of an inflatable purple unicorn on Saturday wasn’t even close to the strangest event to unfold at Bloomington, Indiana’s Community Farmers’ Market this year.The market was once the peaceful home of fresh vegetables and goat cheese. But after the owners of a market stall were outed as supporters of a white supremacist group, it has become the center of a fierce debate on bigotry and free speech. The controversy has led to new rules about where people can hold signs and distribute flyers in the market—and on Saturday, five anti-racist protesters were arrested for allegedly breaking those rules.The unicorn was the first to go. Dressed in an inflatable purple pony suit with a golden horn, protester Forrest Gilmore was removed from the market by two police officers, each gripping one of his purple hooves.Gilmore is part of the Purple Shirt Brigade, an activist coalition that formed this year in response to allegations of white supremacists working at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market. Those allegations began after the arrest of Indiana resident Nolan Brewer for spray-painting Nazi flags on the side of a synagogue and setting off a fire outside. Brewer told authorities he was a dues-paying member of the hate group Identity Evropa, and described getting dinner with another member: Sarah Dye and her husband Douglas Mackey. Brewer also told investigators the screenname Dye used in an Identity Evropa chat room. Local activists then matched that name to Dye and a series of racist messages she posted as “Volkmom.” (Dye denies being a white supremacist, but describes herself as an “identitarian,” a term with little to no meaningful distinction from white supremacy, and which has become popular among white supremacists hoping for more mainstream acceptance.)Farmers’ Markets Have New Unwelcome Guests: FascistsActivists also connected Dye to Schooner Creek Farm, the farm she runs with her husband. The two have a stall in the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market, where some local activists began distributing “Don’t Buy Veggies From Nazis” buttons this summer. The group “No Space for Hate” announced plans to protest at the market, prompting counter-protests from right-wing groups like a local “Three Percenter” militia and new rules about where and how people can express themselves in the market. One anti-Schooner Creek protester was arrested for holding a sign in front of the stall.Bloomington officials ruled this summer that Schooner Creek Farm was not breaking any rules, and that Dye and her husband had a First Amendment right to their beliefs. The protests, however, became the subject of new rules. “New signage will clearly indicate areas designated for flyering and expression and publicize market rules,” the city announced in August.On Saturday, the Purple Shirt Brigade tested those rules.“The idea was to find a way to protest directly in the market,” a spokesperson for the group told The Daily Beast. “Most of us had been protesting with No Space for Hate previously (and still are). The market had created rules earlier in the summer to ban the use of signs in the marketplace.”The group pointed to pictures of a number of recent guests with far-right ties at the Schooner Creek farm stand, including Patrick Casey, the leader of Identity Evropa (which rebranded this year as the American Identity Movement). Casey and other group members attended Unite the Right, the deadly 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.‘Whiter Every Election Cycle’: How Identity Evropa, a Far-Right Hate Group, Joined the GOPOnline, the farm stand has also received support from the right. When Dye shared pictures of protesters this summer (“violent Indiana ANTIFA terrorists at our farmers market booth today”), a commenter asked, “why didn’t anyone just shoot them?”Previously, the Purple Shirt Brigade skirted the anti-signage laws by printing their messages on T-shirts. (“Justice is what love looks like in public,” the shirts read, “Boycott Schooner Creek Farm.”) But they’ve pushed the rules in a bid to see exactly what’s allowed.“We have wanted to challenge the signage rule because we believe it's a violation of our First Amendment rights,” the spokesperson said. “One week we brought purple fans to the market (they looked like signs), and the market staff let us get away with that. However, this week we created signs with statements made by SCF supporters about us (from Facebook comments).”Protesters carrying the signs dressed up as unicorns, vikings, and Wonder Woman. Five were arrested on counts of disorderly conduct and trespassing, and issued 24-hour bans from the market area, the Bloomingtonian reported.In a video captured by the Bloomingtonian, the purple-clad protesters sang “no neo-Nazis in the market” while two unicorns argued with a police officer over exactly how they could protest.“So we can’t sing?” one unicorn asked over the sound of a guitar.“Not in here,” the officer responded. He turned to the other unicorn. “Forrest, I need you to leave as well.”Police were filmed writing the unicorn a citation shortly thereafter.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the Law

No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the LawA  video of New York City police officers arresting a woman for selling churros in a subway station in Brooklyn on Friday night went viral over the weekend -- sparking a lot of outrage on her behalf.The incident made headlines after New York City resident Sofia B. Newman tweeted the video, along with an explanation of what she’d seen:> Tonight as I was leaving Broadway Junction, I saw three or four police officers (one of them was either a plainclothes cop or someone who worked at the station) gathered around a crying woman and her churro cart. Apparently, it's illegal to sell food inside train stations. 1/? pic.twitter.com/sgQVvSHUik> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> They were telling her that she could either give them her churro cart and receive a fine (one that she probably wouldn't have been able to afford), or that they would take her cart and arrest her. 2/?> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> She kept trying to speak to one of the cops in Spanish, but the plainclothes cop kept rolling his eyes and saying things like, "Are you done?" and "I know you can speak English." Eventually, they cuffed her and unceremoniously dragged her and her cart away. 3/? pic.twitter.com/qVIfN7DO7u> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019 According to the Associated Press, the NYPD claims that the woman in the video had received a total of ten summonses for “unlicensed vending” within the past six months. After she was handcuffed, it reports, the cops ultimately let her go with a ticket -- but kept her cart as “arrest evidence.”Unfortunately, this week’s criminalization-of-churros news didn’t end there. The New York Daily News reported on Monday that another woman had been arrested in Brooklyn for selling churros that morning, too.Needless to say, these arrests have been the subject of a lot of controversy. The woman who was arrested Friday, who wanted to be identified only as “Elsa,” told reporters (with the help of a translator) on Monday that the officers eventually “became violent” during the incident, and that she had “felt horrible, nervous and stressed” throughout the ordeal. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, on the other hand, insisted that the police had done nothing wrong, that “she was there multiple times and was told multiple times that this [was] not a place you can be and it’s against the law,” that “she shouldn’t have been there,” that what she did was “not acceptable behavior,” and that the NYPD “officers comported themselves properly from what I can see.” The New York Times ran a story with the headline: “A Woman Selling Churros Was Handcuffed. The Police Face a Backlash.” The Daily News did something similar with its piece, “Police accused of ‘overreach’ in arresting churro seller in Brooklyn subway.”Now, I can’t be sure whether or not the NYPD officers actually “became violent” during the incident with Elsa, as she alleges that they did. I certainly didn’t see that in the video footage, but it’s always a possibility that things happened that weren’t captured. What’s more, I also believe that New York City’s police officers could probably find some more worthwhile things to do than arrest people for selling fried sugar-dough.Still, I can’t help but notice that something seems to be missing from the conversation: Why does no one seem to be pissed off about the law that gives the NYPD the power to arrest these women, and those like them, in the first place?Although I would agree that the police shouldn’t be making these sorts of things a priority, we should also take this opportunity to observe how Big Government can hurt the same people that it claims to want to help. Think about it: Liberal politicians often push for stricter government regulation of businesses and then, in the same breath, claim that they’re the party of the “little guy,” of the disadvantaged and the struggling. Here, we see that that isn’t always the case. Here, what the “little guy” needs most from the government is to do less, so that she can do more for herself.The truth is, stories like this week’s War on Churros serve as evidence against the common misconception that a limited-government philosophy amounts to cold-heartedness, to a cruel disregard (or even outright hatred) for those in this country who are struggling. The truth is, sometimes the best way for the government to help those in need is to stop itself from “helping” them at all.If you have a problem with women being handcuffed for trying to make a living selling pastries, then good; we agree. So, join me in calling for the law to be changed -- so that people can be free to carve out their own living, without fear of arrest, in the country that’s supposed to stand for that exact thing.


13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance Rates

13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance RatesThe U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: Colleges, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.


Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for trips

Ukrainian energy company tied to Hunter Biden supported American think tank, paid for tripsBurisma gave more than $450,000 to the Atlantic Council, a prominent Washington think tank.


PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rain

PHOTOS: Venice flooded from rising tides and rainTourists and Venetians alike have donned high boots and taken to temporary raised walkways to slosh through the high water that has hit much of the lagoon city.


Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian Reaction

Mulvaney’s OMB Held Up Lethal Ukraine Aid in 2017 for Fear of Russian ReactionLeah Millis/ReutersUnder Mick Mulvaney’s leadership, the Office of Management and Budget temporarily put a hold on the delivery of anti-tank missiles to Ukraine in 2017 because of concerns their arrival would upset Russia, according to former White House official Catherine Croft. She described OMB’s objection as “highly unusual.”Croft’s testimony indicates that concerns about the U.S. relationship with Russia had a direct—though short-lived—impact on U.S./Ukraine policy in the first year of Trump’s presidency.Croft told congressional impeachment investigators that after the Trump administration greenlit the delivery of Javelin missiles to Ukraine in late 2017—the first delivery of lethal aid to the country since Russian separatists seized territory in its Eastern region in 2014—Mulvaney’s office held it up. “Did you understand why?” asked the congressional staffer questioning her. “I understood the reason to be a policy one,” she replied. “What was the policy one?” “In a briefing with Mick Mulvaney, the question centered around the Russian reaction,” she continued. “What was the concern about the Russian reaction?” asked the staffer. “That Russia would react negatively to the provision of Javelins to Ukraine,” she said. The Daily Beast first reported last month that OMB held up the 2017 shipment of Javelins to Ukraine. Croft said the hold lasted “about a week or two,” and that “all of the policy agencies” wanted the aid to go to Ukraine. She said OMB’s interest in the decision about whether to send Javelins to Ukraine was abnormal. Key Impeachment Witnesses Finger Mulvaney In the Quid Pro Quo“[It] was rather unusual to have OMB expressing concerns that were purely policy-based and not budget-oriented,” she said. “At the beginning of the Ukrainian Javelin process, I had been told that OMB was taking a policy interest,” she continued. “And OMB began sending working level officials to attend meetings... which was very unusual at the time.” She noted that OMB staff also started attending meetings regarding aid to countries besides Ukraine and that the increase in their involvement was “quite taxing on a very small organization.”Mulvaney and several other OMB officials have refused to participate in the congressional impeachment inquiry. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurtPirates attacked an Italy-flagged offshore supply vessel in the southern Gulf of Mexico, injuring two crew members, the Mexican Navy said on Tuesday, in the latest outbreak of robbery and piracy to hit oil platforms and infrastructure in the area. Owned by Italian offshore contractor Micoperi, the boat is a supply vessel for Mexico's oil industry. Micoperi and the Italian embassy in Mexico did not immediately respond to requests for comment.


51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergarten

51 children injured in chemical attack at China kindergartenMore than 50 people, mostly children, were injured by a man who broke into a kindergarten in southwest China and sprayed them with corrosive liquid, local authorities said Tuesday. The suspect, a 23-year-old surnamed Kong, entered the kindergarten by climbing a wall before spraying victims with sodium hydroxide, said local authorities in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province. The attack took place on Monday at 3:35 pm (0735 GMT), authorities said on their Twitter-like Weibo account.


Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estate

Woman who spoke at Epstein's bail hearing sues his estateA woman who confronted Jeffrey Epstein at a July bail hearing to tell a judge he touched her inappropriately when she was 16 sued his estate Tuesday, alleging he had subjected her to sex trafficking as part of his attacks on young women and girls. Lawyers for Annie Farmer filed the lawsuit in Manhattan federal court, along with a lawsuit on behalf of her sister, Maria Farmer, and Teresa Helm, an Ohio woman. A lawyer for Epstein's estate did not return a message seeking comment.


Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia commentsTulsi Gabbard's lawyers want Hillary Clinton to make her retraction at a press conference and on social media.


How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?

How Did Nazi Germany Crush France During World War II So Easily?Though Germany eventually lost World War II and France again ended up on the victorious side, the leadership traits demonstrated before and during the battle in 1940 are textbook examples of what makes for great leadership—and what kind of leadership leads to defeat.


Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearing

Man charged in Caribbean hotel worker's death skips hearingA Connecticut man charged in the death of a hotel worker he says attacked his family in Anguilla has declined to return to the British Caribbean territory for the latest pretrial hearing, a spokesman said Monday. Scott Hapgood, of Darien, is worried about his safety in light of death threats, and Anguilla officials have not provided assurances that he would be allowed to return home on bond after the hearing, family spokesman Jamie Diaferia said. Anguilla officials rejected an offer for Hapgood to appear by video link for Monday's hearing, Diaferia said.


Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’

Condoleezza Rice Calls Giuliani’s Ukraine Involvement ‘Deeply Troubling’Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice said Monday that reports detailing the involvement of President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in the White House’s Ukraine policy were “deeply troubling.”“What I see right now troubles me. I see a state of conflict between the foreign policy professionals and someone who says he’s acting on behalf of the president but frankly I don’t know if that is the case,” Rice said at a conference in Abu Dhabi. “This is just not a good thing. The world shouldn’t get confusing messages from the United States of America.”Multiple witnesses have alleged in house testimony that Giuliani conducted his own investigative work without regard for the administration’s formal policy.William Taylor, the former top American diplomat in Ukraine, whose testimony was released last week, asserted that Giuliani was actively undermining U.S. foreign policy.“The irregular channel seemed to focus on specific issues, specific cases, rather than the regular channel’s focus on institution building,” Taylor said, according to the transcript. “So the irregular channel, I think under the influence of Mr. Giuliani, wanted to focus on one or two specific cases, irrespective of whether it helped solve the corruption problem, fight the corruption problem.”Earlier Monday, news broke that Lev Parnas, an associate of Giuliani, will tell investigators that Giuliani attempted to leverage an official visit from Vice President Mike Pence to coax Ukraine into announcing an investigation into Joe Biden's son Hunter's business connections to Burisma.Rice also said she thought Trump’s mention of former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma, during the call was “out of bounds.”“The call is murky, it is really murky. I don’t like for the president of the United States to mention an American citizen for investigation to a foreign leader,” Rice said.


Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020

Hillary Clinton says she is being urged by 'many, many, many people' to run in 2020Hillary Clinton on Tuesday declined to rule out launching a future presidential campaign after her two failed bids, saying “many, many, many people” were pressuring her to enter the race.


Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight

Kavanaugh Returns to Spotlight a Year After Nasty Senate Fight(Bloomberg) -- Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has done his best to keep a low profile in the 13 months since one of the most polarizing Senate confirmation fights in U.S. history.From the bench, his questions have been evenhanded and his opinions have been measured. His public appearances have been rare.But Kavanaugh will be back in the spotlight when he gives the featured dinner speech on Thursday at the annual Washington convention of the Federalist Society, the powerful conservative legal group that helped put him on the court.The appearance, in front of an organization Kavanaugh joined in 1988 as a law student, will offer a reminder of his professional roots and help showcase the group’s success in helping load the federal courts with conservative judges -- one of President Donald Trump’s signature achievements.It will also provide a fresh indication of how the Supreme Court’s most controversial justice will navigate the raw feelings that remain after his nomination by Trump and narrow Senate confirmation in the face of sexual assault allegations.About 2,300 people are expected to attend the Antonin Scalia Memorial Dinner, a black-tie-optional event that brings legal luminaries to the cavernous Main Hall of Washington’s Union Station every year. The event will be open to the media, though broadcast coverage will be prohibited.When many Americans last saw Kavanaugh, he was at his Senate confirmation hearing angrily and tearfully denying that he had assaulted Christine Blasey Ford decades ago when both were teenagers.“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election,” Kavanaugh said, with rage that would later be lampooned by actor Matt Damon on “Saturday Night Live.”He was confirmed on a 50-48 vote.‘Gracious’ JusticeThat Brett Kavanaugh bears little resemblance to the one who now sits at one end of the Supreme Court bench, seen only by the few hundred people who typically attend its camera-free argument sessions.Kavanaugh tends to politely challenge both sides during arguments, almost always without tipping his hand on his own views. He often chats amicably with Justice Elena Kagan, who sits to his right and seems to have far more to discuss with him than with Justice Samuel Alito on her other side.“He seems quite comfortable,” said Carter Phillips, a veteran Supreme Court lawyer at Sidley Austin. “He’s very gracious, extremely well-prepared. His questions are good.”Kavanaugh’s written opinions have generally been measured. Though he has almost always voted with his conservative colleagues when the court splits along ideological lines, he has eschewed the sweeping rhetoric of Trump’s other Supreme Court appointee, Neil Gorsuch. On occasion, Kavanaugh has written separate opinions to describe his position as a limited one.“He appears more cautious and pragmatic than Gorsuch, but it’s too early to tell too much,” said Jonathan Adler, a professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.Kavanaugh’s colleagues have publicly welcomed him and said they don’t harbor any ill feelings.“We are all human beings, we all have pasts,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor told a judicial conference in September, according to the Wall Street Journal. “Now whether things occurred or didn’t occur, all of that is irrelevant.”Female ClerksJustice Ruth Bader Ginsburg praised Kavanaugh for hiring four women to serve as his law clerks for his first term, something no justice had done in any term.That decision is as close as Kavanaugh has come to publicly addressing the confirmation controversy since he joined the court.“It was all women, and I think that was not coincidental,” said Melissa Murray, a New York University law professor who testified during the confirmation hearing that she was concerned Kavanaugh would vote to overturn abortion rights. “I think it was intended to be a rebuttal to those who believe those allegations, took those allegations seriously. I think he wanted to sort of counteract the perception that might have been left after the confirmation hearing.”For the public at large, Kavanaugh remains a polarizing figure -- far more so than his longer-serving colleagues. A Marquette Law School poll conducted in September found that 32% of respondents had an unfavorable view of Kavanaugh, with 26% holding a favorable view. No other justice had an unfavorable rating higher than 23%.Though he has met privately with smaller groups, the Federalist Society speech will mark only the second time Kavanaugh has spoken publicly outside the court since the White House ceremony that followed his October 2018 confirmation. Kavanaugh appeared in May with the man he succeeded, Justice Anthony Kennedy, before a conference of judges and lawyers.Standing OvationKavanaugh’s reception at the Federalist Society event is all but certain to be positive, probably overwhelmingly so, though it’s possible he’ll face protests.“I expect he’ll get a very warm reception,” said Adler, a Federalist Society member who plans to attend.Kavanaugh got a lengthy standing ovation when he arrived for last year’s dinner, which took place less than six weeks after the Senate vote. He opted not to give a talk at that event, instead agreeing to speak this year, according to two people familiar with the planning.The Federalist Society’s executive vice president, Leonard Leo, has served as a key adviser to Trump on judicial nominations. Leo declined to be interviewed about Kavanaugh’s work on the court, saying he generally doesn’t comment on individual justices.The dinner is part of a three-day program that features speeches by Gorsuch and Attorney General Bill Barr as well as panel discussions on a plethora of legal topics.“I think it is meaningful that he’s choosing to make a debut of sorts at this particular venue,” Murray said.Chances are Kavanaugh’s speech will steer clear of any discussion of the confirmation controversy. He probably will at least touch on the judicial philosophy that made him a Federalist Society favorite in the first place. He might show the side of himself that promised at his confirmation hearing to be part of a “team of nine” on the court.“I think it will be different than it was in his last public appearance,” said Phillips with a laugh. “He is by nature a gracious and even-tempered person. I expect that that’s the way he will come across.”To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay bar

Uganda charges 67 after raid on gay barA Ugandan court charged 67 people with causing a nuisance on Tuesday after they were arrested in a gay-friendly bar, in a move condemned by activists as the latest "homophobic" attack. The 67 - who were among 127 arrested at Ram Bar, in the capital, Kampala, on Sunday - could face up to one year in jail if found guilty, said Patricia Kimera, a lawyer for the group. "This is just a homophobic attack," LGBT+ activist Raymond Karuhanga told the Thomson Reuters Foundation outside the court.


See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel


With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil War

With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarA traffic police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed 21-year-old pro-democracy protester at point-blank range on Monday. Hours later, a man was set on fire after defending Beijing in an argument. Both individuals were listed in critical condition.Over the weekend, wide-scale disturbances scarred the territory, a semi-autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China. There is essentially a rebellion in Hong Kong. Riot police in green uniforms are doing battle with youthful demonstrators dressed in black. How Hong Kong Protesters Show Which Businesses Are Friend or FoeProtests began in April after Chief Executive Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s top official, proposed legislation authorizing the extradition of fugitives to various jurisdictions, including Mainland China. Starting June 9, when an estimated one million Hong Kongers marched in the streets, demonstrations have been almost continuous. Lam has since permanently withdrawn the extradition bill from consideration, but the protests have not abated. Especially this week. Hong Kong braced for a weekend of disturbances after Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died on Friday after falling from a car park the preceding Sunday while running away from police tear gas. Many have accused the police of delaying medical assistance to the mortally injured Chow.Chow has been called “the first fatality linked to police action during a protest,” but many believe the police have killed others. Demonstrators believe three of their number were beaten to death on August 31 in the Prince Edward Mass Transit Railway station in Mong Kok. Since then, the above-ground entrance to the station has become a shrine, protestors have repeatedly rallied in front of the adjacent Mong Kok police station, and youth have continually trashed MTR trains and stations because they believe management of the rail system has withheld surveillance-camera footage.Even a single death creates a cycle of revenge and retaliation that is almost impossible to control. Chow’s passing sparked a weekend of rage.Moreover, Chief Executive Lam added to the tensions. In her most recent press conference, held Monday after the shooting and burning incidents, she called protesters the “enemy of the people.” Her provocative Cultural Revolution-speak comment came on the heels of her November 4 meeting with Chinese ruler Xi Jinping. China is apparently controlling events, and either out of obliviousness or maliciousness, it is making the situation worse. Beijing has been doing that by forcing Lam to take a hard line. Apart from the withdrawal of the extradition bill—doomed because the normally pro-Beijing business community came out against it early on—she has been intransigent. That intransigence was evident from her Monday remarks. She said she would not yield to violence, but she had previously left Hong Kong people no choice. She had, with her stubbornness, earlier foreclosed the possibility of peaceful change.Hong Kong people may not be able to change her mind, but she cannot change theirs either. The army in black—as well as many other people in the territory—have continued to protest.Analysts say Beijing will eventually lose patience and use force. “This kind of extreme, violent, and destructive activity would not be tolerated or accepted in any country or society in the world nowadays,” said Chinese Vice-Premier Han Zheng as he met with Lam early this month in Beijing.Han’s words were taken as a threat to formally deploy units of the People’s Liberation Army or the People’s Armed Police to the streets of Hong Kong to “crush” the protests and reestablish order. Beijing could move in troops, but the move is unlikely to work. Hong Kong, after all, is ideal territory for defenders, like guerilla fighters supported by an overwhelming portion of the public. Every apartment building there is a fort where hostiles can rain down explosives or petrol bombs on Chinese troops and then disappear into their homes or back alleys. Xi Jinping surely does not want his first war to take tens of thousands of soldiers, last years if not decades, and end in a loss for China.In the meantime, there is credible evidence suggesting Mainland Chinese personnel—troops or police—are now operating on Hong Kong streets in police uniforms. This sly tactic is not working, however. Why not? The Hong Kong police department, once considered the most professional force of its kind in Asia, has lost discipline, something evident from the shooting of the protester Monday and countless other incidents. The breakdown in discipline roughly coincides with early evidence that Chinese forces were mixed in with the Hong Kong police, and the resulting rough tactics have resulted in a loss of support of ordinary residents tired of being tear gassed, clubbed, and manhandled. All this raises the question whether Beijing has given the green light to police officers to act as brutally as they want. Yet whether China did so or not, harsh action by the police is sustaining support for the protesters. Demonstrators this past weekend were chanting “Revenge.” Hong Kong is now at war with itself. There is no end in sight to the fighting.LeBron James Bends the Knee to China, Fails His First Big Test as the NBA’s ConscienceRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack Obama

Democrats need to stop being such babies about Barack ObamaPete Buttigieg got in hot water with many loyal Democrats on Sunday when the Los Angeles Times reported that he cited the "failures of the Obama era" as part of why Trump's election happened. This inspired furious outrage from liberal partisans and party apparatchiks -- only soothed (and tweets deleted) when the reporter said he had misquoted Buttigieg, who was then quick to lavish praise on the ex-president.But as it turns out, Buttigieg previously said almost the exact same thing in a recent interview with Showtime's The Circus. "I don't think there's going back to Obama... the American political world we've been in from the day I was born, has been blown up," he explained, "[thanks to] its own failures which culminated in Trump. Look, if the old way worked, something like Trump would never have been possible."So this recent flap sure looks like another flip-flop from Payola Pete, mayor of Indiana's fourth largest city. But at least in his beta release form, I have to admit that Buttigieg was completely correct. Democrats really need to get over this worshipful reverence of Barack Obama.For one thing, it is simply beyond question that the Obama years were a political disaster. From having commanding majorities in both the House and the Senate, Democrats lost first the former, then the latter, and finally the presidency, as the candidate running as Obama's successor bobbled perhaps the easiest lay-up election in American history. Meanwhile, the party all but collapsed in many states, as devastating national defeats translated into the loss of over 1,000 state legislative seats.As I have written before, the primary reason for the Obama-era Democrats' initial crushing loss in 2010, which locked in Republican gains for a decade at least through their ensuing control of the state gerrymandering process, was policy error -- undershooting the size of the economic stimulus in response to the Great Recession on the one hand, and secretly using homeowner assistance money to bail out the banks on the other. The former was not entirely Obama's fault, as he had to get congressional approval for the stimulus, but the latter was entirely under his control. Millions were left out of work, and about 10 million people losing their homes wreaked further economic devastation. As any historian could tell you, being in power during a huge economic disaster is the surest possible way to get blown out of the water in the next election.If you take Obama out of the equation, what Buttigieg was saying before it looks like folks might stop sending those fat campaign checks is all but conventional wisdom even among liberals. Obama himself reportedly has grave doubts about what Trump means for his legacy. Clearly if the party could lose to the most unpopular major party nominee in the history of polling, whatever was happening before 2016 was not exactly working out.And from the other side of the fence, Obama has shown no inclination to fulfill the sort of leadership role loyal Democrats clearly crave. Despite the shattering national crisis that Trump presents, he has not gone on to a different office -- unlike, say, John Quincy Adams, who returned to the House after his presidency and fought slavery literally until his dying breath. Obama is not out there mobilizing day and night against Trump's migrant concentration camps, or his Muslim ban, or his blatant abuses of power.Only occasionally will Obama pop up to endorse candidates, often centrist or center-right white men like Emmanuel Macron or Justin Trudeau. He largely avoided campaigning in 2018 until the last few weeks before the election. He's mainly keeping to himself, hanging out with rich tycoons and celebrities, and making eye-popping sums giving paid speeches before big corporations and banks.He appears in public only occasionally -- and when he does, he has a tendency to indulge in get-off-my-lawn youth scolding that, as Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote back in 2013, was offensive and out of date when he did it as president. "This idea of purity and you're never compromised and you're always politically 'woke' and all that stuff," he said at a recent Obama Foundation summit. "You should get over that quickly. The world is messy, there are ambiguities." Just like the time when "we tortured some folks," but it was still important to "look forward as opposed to backwards" instead of enforcing the law, I suppose.Jokes aside, this almost beggars belief. President Trump is flagrantly stealing money from the American state, attempting to get foreign countries to gin up political persecutions of Obama's own vice president, and Obama is out here raising worries about exaggerated nonsense from America's most dimwitted and gullible columnists, and earning praise from loathsome trolls:> Good for Obama. (Not sarcastic!) https://t.co/cwq5mcDc7V> > -- Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) October 30, 2019Now, let me be clear: All this is, of course, Obama's complete right as a private citizen. It is, at least for the moment, still a free country. But Democrats should not follow the advice of the Washington Post's Jennifer Rubin, who argues that "it is unheard of for a party following a two-term president not to run on his achievements," in part because "Republicans did that with former president Ronald Reagan for 30 years." She would know, from her previous incarnation as a prolific and absolutely shameless propagandist for Mitt Romney. But the grim fate of the GOP is precisely the problem.We see today what you get when a party loses the ability to think critically about its history, and treats its leaders as infallible saints no matter what they do: Donald Trump.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)

America Wants To Innovate Its Way Out Of A War With Russia Or China (It May Not Work)Russia and China have their own plans.


Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viral

Substitute teacher fired after student beating goes viralA substitute teacher has been fired and charged with aggravated assault following the beating of a 15-year-old female high school student in an incident captured on video. Tiffani Shadell Lankford is free on $10,000 bond after her arrest Friday afternoon. Video of last week's incident in a foreign-language class at Lehman High School in Kyle, Texas, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Austin went viral.


Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet Altan

Turkey police rearrest journalist Ahmet AltanTurkish police acting on a court order rearrested journalist and novelist Ahmet Altan Tuesday, just a week after his release from prison over alleged links to the failed 2016 coup. Altan and another veteran journalist Nazli Ilicak were released on November 4 despite having been convicted of "helping a terrorist group". The Istanbul court sentenced Altan to more than 10 years in jail, but ruled that he and Ilicak should be released under supervision after time already served -- around three years each.


Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales

Bolivia: Jeanine Añez claims presidency after ousting of Evo Morales* Ex-president’s party refuses to recognise senator’s claim * Morales says army told him of $50,000 price on his headJeanine Añez waves from the balcony of the Quemado Palace in La Paz after claiming Bolivia’s interim presidency. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Bolivian senator Jeanine Añez has declared herself the country’s interim president after the resignation of Evo Morales, even though lawmakers from his party boycotted the legislative session where she assumed office.Añez, 52, took temporary control of the Senate late on Tuesday. “I will take the measures necessary to pacify the country,” she said, swearing on a bible to loud cheers and applause. The move is expected to pave the way for fresh elections.Morales’s Movement Towards Socialism called the session illegal and its legislators refused to take part. Nearby hundreds of Morales supporters marched against Añez assuming the role. “She’s declared herself president without having a quorum in the parliament,” Julio Chipana told the Guardian. “She doesn’t represent us.”Morales, who resigned under pressure from police and the army after a fiercely disputed election, has flown into exile in Mexico, leaving a confused power vacuum behind in Bolivia. Speaking at a hastily organised press conference on the tarmac, the former president thanked Mexico for “saving my life” and repeated his accusation that his rivals had forced him out in a coup.He said that before his resignation on Sunday a member of the army had showed him messages putting a $50,000 price on his head.“I thought we had finished with the discrimination and the humiliation, but new groups have emerged that have no respect for life, let alone for the fatherland,” Morales said. “It’s another lesson to learn.”Morales, 60, was greeted with a handshake, a hug and a pat on the cheek from Mexico’s foreign minister, Marcelo Ebrard, after the flight in a Mexican army plane from the Bolivian city of Cochabamba.He defended his time in government and said that if he were guilty any crime, it was to be indigenous and “anti-imperalist”.Morales was accompanied by his former vice-president, Álvaro García Linera, who has been his closest political collaborator since before he became Bolivia’s first indigenous president in modern times.“García Linera and I have always been committed to the idea that peace can only come with social justice,” Morales said. “This coup is not going to change our ideology.”Though he promised that this was not the end of his political career, the Bolivian leader gave no indication of his immediate plans.Morales left behind a country close to chaos as supporters and opponents clashed on the streets, amid reports of fresh looting, vandalism and arson after the October election, which the Organisation of American States found to have been rigged in his favour.On Tuesday much of Bolivia’s main city, La Paz, was like a ghost town after police warned inhabitants to stay indoors. Roadblocks were thrown up across the city as the political uncertainty continued and residents feared more violent clashes.The country remained in political limbo as senators and deputies loyal to the former leader appeared to refuse to endorse the new interim president, deputy senate leader Jeanine Áñez.“The people who have been in all these protests want us to call presidential elections which are not fraudulent, which are trustworthy,” Áñez, a political opponent of Morales, told journalists in the national assembly building.Shirley Franco, an opposition member of parliament, said: “What Bolivians want in this moment of crisis is certainty and we, the maximum authorities in this country, must work to re-establish democracy.”Manning a makeshift barricade a few blocks away, anti-Morales protester Danella Ormachea, 29, said: “We want this to end. We need a new interim president to call new elections so there is democracy and our vote is respected. That’s all we ask.”Martín Cornejo Choque, a rural leader in La Paz province, denied there had been voter fraud.“Before the election, the right said if Evo Morales wins we won’t recognise it. The opposition just don’t want to recognise the votes of the rural areas,” he said.Cornejo, who led dozens of communities to La Paz’s San Francisco square in support of Morales, said Morales had transformed life for rural Bolivians.“Before when there were rightwing, neoliberal presidents they never cared about the peasant farmer. We lived in extreme poverty,” said Cornejo. “Our roads were not paved, we didn’t even have bridges but today, thanks to this government, all the peasant communities have development.”Morales’s sudden departure was a dramatic fall for the former coca growers’ union leader who swept to power 14 years ago in a historic election.He went on to win two more landslide victories and lifted millions out of poverty, but Morales’s popularity began to wane in 2016, when he ignored a referendum in which voters said he could not run for a fourth term.Mass protests broke out after last month’s election following an unexplained 24-hour halt in the voting which fuelled accusations of electoral fraud.Áñez denied that Morales had been the victim of a coup, saying: “What happened in Bolivia was the verification of monumental fraud. A coup d’etat is when there are soldiers in the streets.”Neighbouring countries’ responses to the ousting of Morales have reflected the ideological divisions of a continent where populism on the right and the left has been on the rise once again.Those backing Morales included Venezuela’s embattled leader Nicolás Maduro, Nicaragua’s seemingly eternal president Daniel Ortega, and Cuba’s Miguel Díaz-Canel.This camp also includes Brazil’s former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who blamed it on Latin America’s “economic elite”, and Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández, who said it returned the region to “the bad days of the 70s”.Brazil’s current far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, has been the loudest voice against Morales. “The left uses the word ‘coup’ a lot when it loses, right?” he told O Globo.Other regional leaders have avoided the subject – most notably Chile’s conservative president, Sebastián Piñera, who is clinging to power in the face of a wave of social unrest. His government issued a statement calling for a peaceful and democratic solution. Similar statements have come out of Peru and Colombia.Beyond the region, Donald Trump said that Morales’s resignation “preserves democracy”, while in the UK the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn condemned the “coup against the Bolivian people”.Oliver Stuenkel, an international relations professor at Fundação Getúlio Vargas University in São Paulo, said that describing what happened in Bolivia as a coup did not necessarily imply that Morales had respected democratic norms.“In fact, non-democratic governments are often overthrown through non-democratic means, precisely because they cannot easily be voted out of office,” he tweeted.Meanwhile, Mexico’s very public offer of asylum – which was made before Morales had even asked for it – has prompted some critics of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to accuse him of seeking a distraction from the country’s own security crisis.On Tuesday, Ebrard insisted it fell squarely within a long tradition in which Mexico has provided safety for persecuted political leaders, from Leon Trotsky to activists who fled Argentina and Chile during the military dictatorships of the 70s and 80s.“This is a tradition we should be proud of and continue,” Ebrard said on Tuesday.


A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China

A Closer Look at the Beautified Architectural Revolution Within China


Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secrets

Chinese national pleads guilty in U.S. court to stealing Phillips 66 trade secretsA Chinese national pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing trade secrets from U.S. petroleum company Phillips 66 , where he worked on the research and development of next generation battery technologies, the U.S. Justice Department said. Hongjin Tan, 36, stole information regarding the manufacture of a "research and development downstream energy market product" that is worth more than $1 billion, the department said in a statement. The department identified the company where he worked as Phillips 66 in court documents filed in Oklahoma.


Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPA

Don't stop the fight against mercury pollution: Republican and Democrat to Trump EPAThe mercury rule has protected Americans from dangerous pollution. Changing it threatens gains that include cleaner air and edible seafood.


Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's why

Most priests accused of sexually abusing children were never sent to prison. Here's whyWhy aren't more credibly accused Catholic priests in prison? Blame it on laws that don't allow enough time for abuse survivors to come forward


A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eating

A black man was put in handcuffs after a police officer stopped him on a train platform because he was eatingBay Area Rapid Transit police said Steve Foster, of Concord, California, violated state law by eating a sandwich on a BART station's platform.


Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in Syria

Russia's F-35 Killer: Report Claims S-500 Air Defense System Was 'Tested' in SyriaA defense industry source told Russian news outlet Izvestia last month that the S-500 recently underwent field testing in Syria, where the Russian Aerospace Forces continue to maintain a significant presence. Moscow denied it--but won't dey what they think this air defense platform could do in battle.


Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptopsA federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry. ACLU attorney Esha Bhandari said the ruling strengthens the Fourth Amendment protections of international travelers who enter the United States every year.


Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech

Brazil Politics: Lula Targets Economic Reform Agenda in Speech(Bloomberg) -- Former Brazil President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gave a strong speech on Saturday to a crowd of supporters gathered in front of a metalworkers union headquarters outside the city of Sao Paulo. He criticized the Carwash corruption probe and the market-friendly agenda that is being implemented by President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration and Economy Minister Paulo Guedes’ team. Bolsonaro and his ministers struck back, while military army representatives worry about the risk of violence, according to the local newspapers.Criticism of Guedes“I doubt that the dream-destroying minister, the job-destroyer, the destroyer of Brazilian public companies called Guedes, sleeps with a clear conscience,” Lula said in a speech on Saturday. At the same time, Lula said that Bolsonaro was democratically elected and that the result must be accepted.Lula’s TravelsLula has pledged to travel around Brazil and Latin America, offering support for leftist leaders at a moment when the region is engulfed by growing political turmoil. Lula is expected to start his tour in the Northeast of Brazil, this Sunday, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Bolsonaro’s ReplyBolsonaro broke his silence about Lula’s release and wrote that he will not respond to “criminals who are now free,” via Twitter. Bolsonaro also met top military officials on Saturday morning to assess the outlook after the former president’s release, according to Estado.Military Concern Among the military, there is concern that Lula’s speech may incite violence, according to Estado. According to Folha de S.Paulo, the army fears the risk of radicalization between Bolsonaro and Lula’s supporters, but considers that both were reasonably reserved in their initial comments.CounterattackGuedes’s team is preparing for ways to counter Lula’s speeches. The ministry is betting on the argument that the economy is gaining steam, and that the government has released money, such as the FGTS funds, without cutting benefits, according to Folha. Bolsonaro also endorsed Justice Minister Sergio Moro’s reaction to Lula, according to Folha de S.Paulo. Moro has become a key player in Bolsonaro’s strategy of confronting Lula. The president himself accused Lula of causing the stock market drop on Friday:Agenda Keeps Advancing The government is set to launch a package to encourage the hiring of young and old people. The pension reform may be enacted on Tuesday, while the Senate is expected to complete the first round vote a constitutional amendment to include states and municipalities in the pension reform. The government is expected send a proposal for public administration reform to the lower house. Congress also looks set to speed up debate about jail time for convicts, following last week’s Supreme Court decision.ObstructionBrazil parties pledge to obstruct other agenda items in order to discuss imprisonment. Podemos and Novo parties will obstruct the lower house’s plenary and committees until a constitutional amendment proposal dealing with the rule on imprisonment after first appeal is voted on. Moro also defended the amendment.Bolsonaro about BoliviaLula and Bolsonaro’s reactions to the crisis in Bolivia reflect the growing polarization in Brazil. While Lula called it a “coup,” Bolsonaro said the word “coup” is only used when the left loses, according to O Globo.Other highlightsBolsonaro has sold 91 billion reais in assets of Banco do Brasil, Petrobras and Caixa: Folha de S.PauloGovernment arranges meetings with international oil companies: Valor EconomicoInfrastructure studies fusion between three state-owned transport area: Valor EconomicoNewspaper Top StoriesO Estado de S. Paulo, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo Newspapers highlight Evo Morales’ resignation in BoliviaValor EconomicoReports that only 6% of cities meet basic sanitation goalsTo contact the translation editor responsible for this story: Matthew Malinowski at mmalinowski@bloomberg.netReporter on the original story: Fernando Travaglini in in São Paulo at ftravaglini@bloomberg.netEditors responsible for the original story: Daniela Milanese at dmilanese@bloomberg.net, Josue LeonelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation reveals

Trump adviser Stephen Miller injected white nationalist agenda into Breitbart, investigation revealsEmails to former Breitbart writer show Miller focused on inserting white nationalist talking points to shape 2016 election coverageStephen Miller, senior adviser to Donald Trump, walks across the South Lawn of the White House on 4 November. Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPASenior Trump adviser Stephen Miller shaped the 2016 election coverage of the hard right-wing website Breitbart with material drawn from prominent white nationalists, Islamophobes, and far-right websites, according to a new investigative report by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).Miller also railed against those wishing to remove Confederate monuments and flags from public display in the wake of Dylann Roof’s murderous 2015 attack on a black church in Charleston, South Carolina, and praised America’s early 20th-century race-based, restrictionist immigration policies.Emails from Miller to a former Breitbart writer, sent before and after he joined the Trump campaign, show Miller obsessively focused on injecting white nationalist-style talking points on race and crime, Confederate monuments, and Islam into the far-right website’s campaign coverage, the SPLC report says.Miller, one of the few surviving initial appointees in the administration, has been credited with orchestrating Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies.The SPLC story is based largely on emails provided by a former Breitbart writer, Katie McHugh. McHugh was fired by Breitbart over a series of anti-Muslim tweets and has since renounced the far right, telling the SPLC that the movement is “evil”.However, throughout 2015 and 2016, as the Trump campaign progressed and she became an increasingly influential voice at Breitbart, McHugh told the SPLC that Miller urged her in a steady drumbeat of emails and phone calls to promote arguments from sources popular with far-right and white nationalist movements.Miller’s emails had a “strikingly narrow” focus on race and immigration, according to the SPLC report.At various times, the SPLC reports, Miller recommendations for McHugh included the white nationalist website, VDare; Camp of the Saints, a racist novel focused on a “replacement” of European whites by mass third-world immigration; conspiracy site Infowars; and Refugee Resettlement Watch, a fringe anti-immigrant site whose tagline is “They are changing America by changing the people”.McHugh also says that in a phone call, Miller suggested that she promote an analysis of race and crime featured on the website of a white nationalist organization, American Renaissance. The American Renaissance article he mentioned was the subject of significant interest on the far right in 2015.In the two weeks following the murder of nine people at a church in Charleston by the white supremacist Dylann Roof as Americans demanded the removal of Confederate statues and flags, Miller encouraged McHugh to turn the narrative back on leftists and Latinos.“Should the cross be removed from immigrant communities, in light of the history of Spanish conquest?” he asked in one email on 24 June.“When will the left be made to apologize for the blood on their hands supporting every commie regime since Stalin?” he asked in another the following day.When another mass shooting happened in Oregon in October 2015, Miller wrote that the killer, Chris Harper-Mercer “is described as ‘mixed race’ and born in England. Any chance of piecing that profile together more, or will it all be covered up?”Miller repeatedly brings up President Calvin Coolidge, who is revered among white nationalists for signing the 1924 Immigration Act which included racial quotas for immigration.In one email, Miller remarks on a report about the beginning of Immigrant Heritage Month by writing: “This would seem a good opportunity to remind people about the heritage established by Calvin Coolidge, which covers four decades of the 20th century.” The four decades in question is the period between the passage of the Immigration Act and the abolition of racial quotas.Miller also hints at conspiratorial explanations for the maintenance of current immigration policies. Mainstream coverage of the 50th anniversary of the removal of racial quotas in immigration policy had lacked detail, Miller believed, because “Elites can’t allow the people to see that their condition is not the product of events beyond their control, but the product of policy they foisted onto them.”.Miller used a US government email address during the early part of the correspondence, when he was an aide to senator Jeff Sessions, and then announced his new job on the Trump campaign, and a new email address, to recipients including McHugh.As well as McHugh, recipients of his emails included others then at Breitbart who subsequently worked in the Trump administration, including Steve Bannon and current Trump aide, Julia Hahn.


U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commander

U.S. troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases: Senior commanderAt a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the ISIS militants and prevent the extremists from resurging or breaking out of prisons.


Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of Kosovo

Ghana reverses 'premature' recognition of KosovoGhana has revoked its "premature" recognition of Kosovo -- a move backed by Serbia, which opposes statehood for the former Yugoslav province. "The government of Ghana has decided to withdraw Ghana’s recognition of Kosovo as an independent state," deputy foreign minister Charles Owiredu told AFP on Tuesday. The reasons were communicated to Serbia in a letter, he said.


Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most Overrated

Douglas MacArthur Is One of America's Most Famous Generals. He's Also the Most OverratedHe might be one of President Trump's favorite generals, but as Hampton Sides writes, Douglas MacArthur was far from a military genius.


Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police say

Atlanta college student Alexis Crawford was choked to death, dumped in park, police sayAuthorities say Alexis Crawford and her roommate Jordyn Jones had a physical altercation and Jones' boyfriend intervened and choked Crawford to death.


Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII site

Chinese land deal in Solomon's Guadalcanal disrupts access to WWII siteTour operators and the Japanese ambassador to the Solomons say it appears to be a case of a lack of understanding of the significance of the Alligator Creek site by the new owner. The issue has stirred up debate in the Solomons concerning its new relationship with China, which was formalized in September following the Pacific island nation's decision to sever its diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of Beijing.


Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?

Taiwan Wants American F-16V Fighters but Will Washington Sell Them?Taipei is worried about China.


Most distant world ever explored gets new name: Arrokoth

Most distant world ever explored gets new name: ArrokothThe most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year's Day, 3 ½ years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us.


Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. Reentry

Liz Cheney Backs Barring Erdogan Bodyguards Who Assaulted Protesters from U.S. ReentryRepresentative Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) called on the State Department Monday to ban the bodyguards of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan who assaulted protesters in a 2017 incident in Washington, D.C. from reentering the U.S.In May 2017, members of the Turkish Presidential Protection Department (TPPD), Turkey's equivalent of the Secret Service, attacked pro-Kurdish protesters outside the residence of the Turkish ambassador. The assault, in which protesters and American law-enforcement officials were injured, was captured on video.In a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Cheney requested that "none of the people who were in the United States with President Erdoğan in 2017 and participated in physical attacks on American citizens—including those protesting lawfully, our secret service, our diplomatic service, and our law enforcement officials—will be allowed into the United States again this week.""At least eleven people were injured throughout the day, including law enforcement personnel who every day defend Americans' constitutional rights and physical safety," Cheney wrote.The letter comes in advance of a planned White House visit by Erdogan this Wednesday.TPPD agents have a history of confrontational incidents on U.S. soil. In 2016, TPPD officers attacked journalists at a Brookings Institution event, and in 2011, they attacked U.N. security personnel at U.N. headquarters in New York.Pompeo on Monday said that President Trump will raise the topic of Turkey's recent invasion of Syria in his meeting with Erdogan."We will talk about what transpired there and how we can do our level best collectively to ensure the protection of all of those in Syria, not just the Kurds, but everyone in Syria," Pompeo told cadets at The Citadel after delivering a Veterans Day speech.


Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’

Inside Hezbollah: How Lebanon protests are breaking ‘fear barrier’Hezbollah amassed great power even as its fighters died in Syria. But the bold uprising in Lebanon has brought quiet Shiite grumblings into the open.


Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in Britain

Hillary Clinton: I Want to Hug Meghan Markle After ‘Racist’ Abuse in BritainSAMUEL CORUMHillary Clinton has said she wishes she could hug Meghan Markle as she accused the mainstream British media of participating in a cycle of abuse against her motivated by racism and sexism.The former first lady and presidential candidate was appearing on BBC radio in Britain to promote a new book she has written with her daughter, Chelsea, about “gutsy” women.Don’t Expect Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Media War to Simmer Down SoonHillary said the abuse she had suffered was “heartbreaking and wrong” and said she was in no doubt there was a racial element to the abuse she has endured since starting a relationship with Harry in 2016 and marrying him in 2018.Meghan and Harry have been outspoken in their criticism of the press: Meghan is suing the Mail on Sunday after alleging the paper unlawfully published a private letter to her father, while the prince is bringing a separate case alleging phone-hacking.Asked to comment on her legal action, Chelsea Clinton said: “We each have to do what we think is the right thing for ourselves and in her case I would imagine for her son… I think absolutely there’s a racist and a sexist element to what’s going on here.” Hillary added that “race was clearly an element” in some of the social-media backlash Meghan had faced since her relationship with the prince began in 2016, and that traditional media had amplified that.  “To think that some of your, what we would call mainstream media, actually allowed that to be printed in their pages, or amplified, was heartbreaking and wrong. “She is an amazing young woman, she has an incredible life story. She has stood up for herself, she has made her own way in the world. And then she falls in love, and he falls in love with her, and everybody should be celebrating that because it is a true love story.“I feel as a mother I just want to put my arms around her. Oh my God, I want to hug her. I want to tell her to hang in there, don’t let those bad guys get you down.”Clinton suggested that Meghan could employ “some humor, some deflection” to better cope with negative attention.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymous

Republican Rep. Will Hurd breaks with Trump, insists whistleblower remain anonymousA Republican lawmaker on Sunday broke with the President Trump and fellow party members to reject the idea that the whistleblower whose complaint prompted an impeachment inquiry into the president should have to testify publicly.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First Amendment

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hasn't stopped blocking critics on Twitter despite settling a lawsuit charging she violated the First AmendmentOcasio-Cortez recently apologized for blocking a critic on Twitter and settled a lawsuit he filed alleging she violated the First Amendment.


Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrants

Supreme Court leans toward Trump plan to end DACA program for nearly 700K undocumented immigrantsThe Supreme Court appeared likely to side with the Trump administration in its effort to end the DACA program for 660,000 undocumented immigrants.


These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested

These Are the Shortest-Stopping Cars We've Ever Tested


Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)But a larger question looms.


Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible week

Wisconsin Assembly votes to recognize tree, Bible weekRepublicans who lead the Wisconsin Assembly voted Tuesday to call the state Capitol evergreen a Christmas tree and formally recognize National Bible Week, moves they said were necessary to ensure Christianity isn't marginalized as the holidays approach. The 64-30 vote on naming the tree was a direct response to Gov. Tony Evers' declaration last week that it would be called a "holiday tree." Evers' Republican predecessor Scott Walker, the son of a Baptist minister, declared the evergreen was a Christmas tree during his first term in 2011. "It seems like the only religion we're willing to take shots at is Christianity," Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke told reporters during a news conference.


Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandal

Taiwan seeks return of 'criminal income' from frigate scandalTaiwan is seeking the return of hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten funds linked to a controversial deal to buy French frigates over two decades ago, prosecutors said Tuesday. Taiwanese arms dealer Andrew Wang was indicted for corruption in 2006 for reaping hundreds of millions of dollars from the deal, and his family were also found guilty as his accomplices. Wang and his family were put on Taiwan's most wanted list after they fled the island shortly before the scandal broke in 1993.


Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrest

Top Iraqi cleric casts doubt on reforms offered to defuse unrestIraq's top Shi'ite cleric on Monday expressed concern that the political elite is not serious about enacting reforms in the face of mass unrest and said protesters should not go home until concrete steps had been taken to meet their demands. Security forces shot dead two protesters in the city of Nassiriya, bringing to 300 the number of people have been killed since protests against political corruption, unemployment and poor public services erupted in Baghdad on Oct. 1 and spread to the southern Shi'ite heartlands. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, who only speaks on politics in times of crisis and wields enormous influence over public opinion in Shi'ite-majority Iraq, on Monday met Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, the U.N. mission chief in the country.


Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s Market

Cops Bust Unicorn Protesting White Supremacy at Indiana Farmer’s MarketCourtesy of The Purple Shirt BrigadeThe arrest of an inflatable purple unicorn on Saturday wasn’t even close to the strangest event to unfold at Bloomington, Indiana’s Community Farmers’ Market this year.The market was once the peaceful home of fresh vegetables and goat cheese. But after the owners of a market stall were outed as supporters of a white supremacist group, it has become the center of a fierce debate on bigotry and free speech. The controversy has led to new rules about where people can hold signs and distribute flyers in the market—and on Saturday, five anti-racist protesters were arrested for allegedly breaking those rules.The unicorn was the first to go. Dressed in an inflatable purple pony suit with a golden horn, protester Forrest Gilmore was removed from the market by two police officers, each gripping one of his purple hooves.Gilmore is part of the Purple Shirt Brigade, an activist coalition that formed this year in response to allegations of white supremacists working at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market. Those allegations began after the arrest of Indiana resident Nolan Brewer for spray-painting Nazi flags on the side of a synagogue and setting off a fire outside. Brewer told authorities he was a dues-paying member of the hate group Identity Evropa, and described getting dinner with another member: Sarah Dye and her husband Douglas Mackey. Brewer also told investigators the screenname Dye used in an Identity Evropa chat room. Local activists then matched that name to Dye and a series of racist messages she posted as “Volkmom.” (Dye denies being a white supremacist, but describes herself as an “identitarian,” a term with little to no meaningful distinction from white supremacy, and which has become popular among white supremacists hoping for more mainstream acceptance.)Farmers’ Markets Have New Unwelcome Guests: FascistsActivists also connected Dye to Schooner Creek Farm, the farm she runs with her husband. The two have a stall in the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market, where some local activists began distributing “Don’t Buy Veggies From Nazis” buttons this summer. The group “No Space for Hate” announced plans to protest at the market, prompting counter-protests from right-wing groups like a local “Three Percenter” militia and new rules about where and how people can express themselves in the market. One anti-Schooner Creek protester was arrested for holding a sign in front of the stall.Bloomington officials ruled this summer that Schooner Creek Farm was not breaking any rules, and that Dye and her husband had a First Amendment right to their beliefs. The protests, however, became the subject of new rules. “New signage will clearly indicate areas designated for flyering and expression and publicize market rules,” the city announced in August.On Saturday, the Purple Shirt Brigade tested those rules.“The idea was to find a way to protest directly in the market,” a spokesperson for the group told The Daily Beast. “Most of us had been protesting with No Space for Hate previously (and still are). The market had created rules earlier in the summer to ban the use of signs in the marketplace.”The group pointed to pictures of a number of recent guests with far-right ties at the Schooner Creek farm stand, including Patrick Casey, the leader of Identity Evropa (which rebranded this year as the American Identity Movement). Casey and other group members attended Unite the Right, the deadly 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.‘Whiter Every Election Cycle’: How Identity Evropa, a Far-Right Hate Group, Joined the GOPOnline, the farm stand has also received support from the right. When Dye shared pictures of protesters this summer (“violent Indiana ANTIFA terrorists at our farmers market booth today”), a commenter asked, “why didn’t anyone just shoot them?”Previously, the Purple Shirt Brigade skirted the anti-signage laws by printing their messages on T-shirts. (“Justice is what love looks like in public,” the shirts read, “Boycott Schooner Creek Farm.”) But they’ve pushed the rules in a bid to see exactly what’s allowed.“We have wanted to challenge the signage rule because we believe it's a violation of our First Amendment rights,” the spokesperson said. “One week we brought purple fans to the market (they looked like signs), and the market staff let us get away with that. However, this week we created signs with statements made by SCF supporters about us (from Facebook comments).”Protesters carrying the signs dressed up as unicorns, vikings, and Wonder Woman. Five were arrested on counts of disorderly conduct and trespassing, and issued 24-hour bans from the market area, the Bloomingtonian reported.In a video captured by the Bloomingtonian, the purple-clad protesters sang “no neo-Nazis in the market” while two unicorns argued with a police officer over exactly how they could protest.“So we can’t sing?” one unicorn asked over the sound of a guitar.“Not in here,” the officer responded. He turned to the other unicorn. “Forrest, I need you to leave as well.”Police were filmed writing the unicorn a citation shortly thereafter.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the Law

No One Should Be Handcuffed over Churros — So Let’s Change the LawA  video of New York City police officers arresting a woman for selling churros in a subway station in Brooklyn on Friday night went viral over the weekend -- sparking a lot of outrage on her behalf.The incident made headlines after New York City resident Sofia B. Newman tweeted the video, along with an explanation of what she’d seen:> Tonight as I was leaving Broadway Junction, I saw three or four police officers (one of them was either a plainclothes cop or someone who worked at the station) gathered around a crying woman and her churro cart. Apparently, it's illegal to sell food inside train stations. 1/? pic.twitter.com/sgQVvSHUik> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> They were telling her that she could either give them her churro cart and receive a fine (one that she probably wouldn't have been able to afford), or that they would take her cart and arrest her. 2/?> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019> She kept trying to speak to one of the cops in Spanish, but the plainclothes cop kept rolling his eyes and saying things like, "Are you done?" and "I know you can speak English." Eventually, they cuffed her and unceremoniously dragged her and her cart away. 3/? pic.twitter.com/qVIfN7DO7u> > -- Sofia B. Newman (@SofiaBNewman) November 9, 2019 According to the Associated Press, the NYPD claims that the woman in the video had received a total of ten summonses for “unlicensed vending” within the past six months. After she was handcuffed, it reports, the cops ultimately let her go with a ticket -- but kept her cart as “arrest evidence.”Unfortunately, this week’s criminalization-of-churros news didn’t end there. The New York Daily News reported on Monday that another woman had been arrested in Brooklyn for selling churros that morning, too.Needless to say, these arrests have been the subject of a lot of controversy. The woman who was arrested Friday, who wanted to be identified only as “Elsa,” told reporters (with the help of a translator) on Monday that the officers eventually “became violent” during the incident, and that she had “felt horrible, nervous and stressed” throughout the ordeal. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, on the other hand, insisted that the police had done nothing wrong, that “she was there multiple times and was told multiple times that this [was] not a place you can be and it’s against the law,” that “she shouldn’t have been there,” that what she did was “not acceptable behavior,” and that the NYPD “officers comported themselves properly from what I can see.” The New York Times ran a story with the headline: “A Woman Selling Churros Was Handcuffed. The Police Face a Backlash.” The Daily News did something similar with its piece, “Police accused of ‘overreach’ in arresting churro seller in Brooklyn subway.”Now, I can’t be sure whether or not the NYPD officers actually “became violent” during the incident with Elsa, as she alleges that they did. I certainly didn’t see that in the video footage, but it’s always a possibility that things happened that weren’t captured. What’s more, I also believe that New York City’s police officers could probably find some more worthwhile things to do than arrest people for selling fried sugar-dough.Still, I can’t help but notice that something seems to be missing from the conversation: Why does no one seem to be pissed off about the law that gives the NYPD the power to arrest these women, and those like them, in the first place?Although I would agree that the police shouldn’t be making these sorts of things a priority, we should also take this opportunity to observe how Big Government can hurt the same people that it claims to want to help. Think about it: Liberal politicians often push for stricter government regulation of businesses and then, in the same breath, claim that they’re the party of the “little guy,” of the disadvantaged and the struggling. Here, we see that that isn’t always the case. Here, what the “little guy” needs most from the government is to do less, so that she can do more for herself.The truth is, stories like this week’s War on Churros serve as evidence against the common misconception that a limited-government philosophy amounts to cold-heartedness, to a cruel disregard (or even outright hatred) for those in this country who are struggling. The truth is, sometimes the best way for the government to help those in need is to stop itself from “helping” them at all.If you have a problem with women being handcuffed for trying to make a living selling pastries, then good; we agree. So, join me in calling for the law to be changed -- so that people can be free to carve out their own living, without fear of arrest, in the country that’s supposed to stand for that exact thing.


13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance Rates

13 Colleges With the Lowest Acceptance RatesThe U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: Colleges, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.